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I 1 1 1 I II I II 1 1 

D 500? 1001428 1 

California Slate LtVary 



v*»r 














Vol. 35. 



SAN FBANOISCO. SATURDAY. JULY 12. 1884. 6S3^< 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Bonerotait irnlornrlm 4 1 

A LoMbtaom* Guffiwia B 

A r«rt for ft r t o rtu :t 

Am W« Doomed 1 3 

A Etanalui 10 

b*i»v (poetry) B 

IS 

lti 

hi Bin Uettioda is 

Club Ltf« in San Fraitctoco— No. ''. BU 

Gotntmnl ■ n.iirs 20 

Cnulle, Altar and T.mib Ijs 

Ktuthiun'si Voice 2 

Finding It Out 10 

1 ODjAdentton of the Millionaires 9 

Oentlemen -1 

Granolithic Stone 2 

Li io 

Bow to Spend It «- 10 

Let the l. IS 

M&tc nt Monterey 14 



SoUblU* 17 

Our PQgtlinj LG 

Puatog Remarks lfi 

w and ti 

Price* oi Leading Stocks, etc l 

Real Estate Transactions 17 

Scientific end (JsofuJ 19 

s.i.n :i 

Somi thing Nice 

Sporting 7 

l 

Sunbeams 5 

Tin- Heathen at Homo .... 5 

The v>>n-.tr. ms Fraud ID Humboldt 

County Redwood Land ir> 

There Is No Death (poetry) 9 

The T.iriff [Bsue 10 

The Two-Thirds Rule 10 

" The World," the Flesh, and the Devil 8 

Town Crier 11 

v, b . r Might Have Been (poetry). ... 4 



STOCKS. 
The holiday season has developed a better feeling in the stock mar- 
ket, and higher prices have prevailed along the line. There is one good 
feature about the rise, the "leading stuck authority" is nn the bear 
lack and evidently badly scared that he will be injured. His published 
interviews with some of our leading mining men areas ridiculous as they 
are amusing. His piteous appeals for their merciful co-operation in crush- 
ing oat of the market the germs of a new life may perhaps seem a 
little inconsistent to some folks who took the trouble to wade through 
the lengthy sermons on the "wrecking" question, which emanated 
from the same source a few months since, we called attention before 
to the "authority's" action in publishing a bear telegram from the 
Superintendent of Bodie — which bore on its face the imprint of manipu- 
lation—with the evident intent of injuring the stock. There was a 
doubt u to the motive then ; there is none now. His subsequent 
course proves clearly that the subject of notice is always viewed from 
a disinterested standpoint, and always for the public good, provided it 
suits some one's pocket. Corporation collars are difficult to hide. They 
will crop out now and then, especially when the hireling wearer, feeling 
the weight without the desired emolument, begins to squeal. Nothing 
but an insufferable amount of unadulterated gall, the product of brain- 
less egotism, could permit such a being to even insinuate that one could 
be found low enough to ape either his words or actions. Some people, 
like springs, should dry up about this time of the year. 

The Middle stocks will naturally be lively, owing to the improved pros- 
pect in Xorcross and Chollar. The public will, therefore, do well to be- 
ware of the felines which are apt to protrude their heads through sym- 
pathy. 

The present prospect on the 2800 foot level of Hale & Norcross is more 
favorable than any thing they have encountered in this mine for years. 
The assays average about $100. The extent is unknown. In Mexican 
they are sinking as rapidly as possible to the 3300-foot level. A large 
body of white quartz is being passed through at present, which, although 
carrying no metal, is of a formation and quality indicative of the presence 
of good ore. Nothing new to report in Best & Belcher and Gould & 
Curry. No material change has taken place in either since our last 
issue. 

The Alta east drift is within about fifteen feet of the ledge. There is a 
little water coming in, but not enough to interfere with the work. This 
statement, of course, differs materially from the latest official news, 
which, however, does not seem strange, when we recall the paat history 
of the mine under its present management. Reports from the Alta 
o'ffice, or from any of its officers, never did amount to anything, and the 
safer plan is to take no stock in anything they may circulate. We get 
our information from a reliable source, which renders us thoroughly in- 
dependent of any officials. The game in this quarter is apparently to de- 
ceive outside stockholders as to time and amount of work performed, 
so that the inside may have full opportunity to keep the stock well in 
hand for manipulation when the ledge is reached during the coming 
week. This stock will require careful handling in the near future. It in 
bound to sell for higher prices, merit or no merit. Investors will be sen- 
sible if they take a fair profit when they see it ; hanging on too long is 
dangerous when the wins are in the hands of such artful schemers as the 
Alta clique. 

The one dollar dividend has had a disastrous effect on Bodie shares. 
Since it was declared the market value of the mine has declined fully fifty 
per cent. It looks as though the job we hinted at some weeks ago as 
probable, was put up to rake in the 23,000 shares in office. These shares 
belong to the shareholders, and should be divided pro rata. Some 
parties interested should take bold of this matter, and force the com- 
pany to disgorge. If they do not, the inside ring will scoop them in the 
usual manner — sell them for a trifle to some confederate on the outside, 
and divide the profits. 

Navajo has scored an advance, and is selling for more than any of onr 
celebrated Comstock mines. Everything working smoothly in and around 

the mine. Shipments of bullion coming along regularly. 

London, July 10 —Consuls. 99 15-16d.@100 l-18d. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE CO., FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 



IsromcK ol tii, 
Men h ml itresl Oflta 



AKKnl'LANK COMPANY El 
hours from 1 I" - r. N. 



tlDg Hie Air, 609 



G 



OLD BARS— Hi'ii fine par. Kkkinki- Sii.vkk 1 1 <m.~. i- cunt, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars, L0£@10] per cent. 61k. 

"Exchange on New York, 20c fa 16c.; on London Bankei 
Paris, sight, 5-12',(a510 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New York, 
30c, 



" Price of Money here, 7@9 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1^ per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
6 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand good. 

■ Latest price of Sterling in New York, 4S4 \(q -isi','.. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Francisco, Jitltf J I, isst. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stoc/te and Bonds. 


BUI. 


A -I'd 


BONDS, 








40 


42 


Cal. State Bonds, 6's, '57 


— 


— 


BANKB. 






S. F. City Jfe Co. B'ds. Ba/SB 


— 


— 


Bunk of Cnlif'iniia 


1(10 


163 




= 


= 




180 

112 


135 






118 




KAILKOA0S. 




Sacramento City Bonds 


— 


— 


C. P. R. R. Stotk 


31 


37 




— 


— 


C. P. R. R. Bonds 


110 


111 




— 


— 




-n 


88 


Marysville City Bonds 


— 


— 


Omnibus K K 


01 


05 




— 


— 


N. B. an 1 Mission ft. R, 


9j 


96', 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 


— 


— 


Sutter Street R. R 


OS 


99 


Los Angeles City Bonds 


— 






97 




Virg'a £ Truckee R. li. Bds. 


— 


— 


Central 't. H. Co 


•.'li 




Nevada Co. N. O. R. R. Bds 


— 


— 




\"ii] 


Num. 




— 


— 


Clav Street Hill R. 11 


Nom. 


Nona. 


Or.R.&X.Co.Bonds,6s(ex e) 


106 


10s 


S. F. Gaslight Co 


50 


50J 




as 


991 




29 






11&I 

100 


119] 

192 


Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex div) 
Califor'a Powder Co 




59 


N. Pacific R.R. Bonds 


110 


145 




142 


123 

147 




z 






Gold and Stock Tolejf'h Co 










123 


125} 


S.V.W.W.Oo'sSlookfexdv) 


8TJ 
L16J 


87} 




85 


92 


S.v.w.w.tVs Bonds 
Pacific Coast S.S. Go's Stock 


Lie] 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




— 


125 




185 


14S 




40 


44 




01 












54 


35 
12 
G< 
SO 


INSURANTS C0MPANIK8. 


LIS 

117 






120 






133 


California Iron and Steel Co. 




ll» 



Three industrial enterprises pass their dividend thin month: The Cali- 
fornia Iron and Steel Co., the Giant Powder Co. and the Atlantic Pow- 
der Co. The effect on the price of these securities is very serious, 50 shares 
Iron and Steel Co. having been sold yesterday at $15, and the two Pow- 
der stocks offered at 70 anil 50 respectively, without finding buyers. As- 
suredly these figures are unreasonable. Against this the following divi- 
dends are announced: Spring Valley Water Stock, 50c. per share; Safe 
Deposit Co., 25c. per share ; Bank of California, 82 50 per share ; First 
National Bank, -?2 per share ; Pacific Bank, 84 per share ; Home Mutual 
Ins. Co., SI per share ; State Investment Ins. Co., $1 per share ; Com- 
mercial Ins. Co., SI per share ; Union Ins. Co., S3 per share, The busi- 
ness of the week is baldly worthy of notice, transactions being in small 
lots. Spring Valley Water stock is, however, an exception, about &00 
shares changing hands, from 871 to 88. Money is easier, and on collateral 
loans is offered at 8 per cent, per share. A. Baird, 411 Montgomery St. 



CLEVELAND. 
The Democratic National Convention nominated Governor Cleve- 
land for President of the United States yesterday on the third ballot. 
The Governor owes bis nomination to the belief that he can surely carry 
New York and so win the Presidency. He was elected Governor of the 
Empire State by the vast majority of 1!>2,000, and is undoubtedly popu- 
lar there. His administration has been such as to win the approval and 
support of the "Independents." The numerous Republican papers that 
have bolted Blaine promised in advance that they would support Cleveland 
if theDemocrats would nominate him. It looks as if his chances of elec- 
tion are good. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 11, 
1884.— U. 3. Bonds— 3s, 100; 4s, 119|; 4Js, 112. Sterling Exchange, 
484 , ,(5>48Gi. Western Union, 55g. Wool— Spring, fine, 20f®24 ; Burry, 
10@16 ; fulled, 28@38 ; Fall Clips, 16(&20 ; Burry, 10@14. London, 
July 11. — Liverpool Wheat Market, 7s. Firm. 

Hawaii.— The steamship Alameda, 7 days from Honolulu, brought for 
cargo 35,168 bags Sugar, 134 kegs ditto, 3,679 bags Rice, 2.117 bdls. 
Bananas, etc. 

Registered at the Postotfice at San Francisco. California, as Secuiid-Cmss Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AND 



July 12, 1884. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



•' I say, why don't you write the girls' ties up, mother ?" said Bertie 
at dinner yesterday. *' What do you know about girls' ties ?" said Alice, 
with a decided accent on the you. 

" Well, I guess I know about as much as any one. I was walking 
with a girl — " " O, 0, O, which girl? Molly or Kitty or Jane, since 
you say you have one for every day in the week ?" chorused the family 
generally. " Never mind which," went on Bertie, " but her tie was 
rocky, it was a man's tie ; that is it looked as if she'd been going in for 
crazy patchwork and selected the cleanest of the ties she'd begged, while 
the band which showed up under her collar was different in pattern. 
She looked as if she was getting up a blush when I fixed my eyes on that 
soiled band, and immediately pushed it down." 

"I don't believe a word of it. I never see such ties worn," and then 
on the spot I was informed by the family that girls were growing more 
" mannish " every day, and the male tie was a thing to be seen on every 
woman in the town. For my own part I have not as yet seen this par- 
ticular fashion, but I have no doubt it is true, for the female part of the 
community are growing so "mannish" in every particular that to ape 
a tie is the least of their aspirations. I wonder they don't go in for 
School Directors' places ; though, as a rule, I prefer the male sex to my 
own, I will say this that women are at least honest, and as they are 
fighting for suffrage why not go in for the schools. I don't believe one 
of them would take either a desk or a stove, but all this by the way. 
Among other things that women do nowadays is to go without skirts. 
Of course this requires a very good form, but then, as I often tell you, 
form i3 so easily purchased that there is no longer a difficulty about that. 
So then the prevailing fashion is to wear only one underskirt, and thus 
your dress falls prone to your feet. A well-formed woman in a slinky 
garment is quite a pretty sight, and then as a set-off the round full 
skirt with a bustle is equally the mode, and the scraggy female can habit , 
herself thus without being in the wrong. It is fortunate indeed that 
there are two styles, for she who rejoices in much bone and little flesh 
does not ' pan out ' well as a model in a straight up-and-down skirt. 

Should you choose the tight skirt, ladies, do not use the old-fashioned 
strings to draw in the dress tight over the hips, but rather prefer elastic 
bands, which should be wide, and which you can fasten from side to side 
with safety pins. Again there is another method of running three rows 
of wire in the back of the skirt that makes it stand out just enough to 
save you from lookiDg like a plank. I think the be3t inversion, in the 
shape of an underskirt, I have seen, is the "Lewis skirt," invented by 
Mrs. Lewis. It is made of moreen, and answers every purpose. In it 
you look like a fashion plate, and, unlike other skirts, this garment gives 
with the position of the wearer. Most skirts made with stiff backs 
jump about in a disagreeable manner. If you sit down sideways they 
kick up at the other side; if you sit down flat they kick up in front. 

Well, of course, if you have pretty feet and a silk stocking, you can 
afford the kick; but if your pedal arrangements lack beauty, a skirt that 
kicks is an abominable nuisance, especially if your young man is sitting 
in the room at an angle where he can view all the discrepancies in your 
understandings. Take my friendly advice and patronize the skirt I have 
mentioned — a proceeding you will never regret. 

There is no particular style of fabric more general than another, which 
is a circumstance to be thankful for. Tou may buy your silk thick or 
thin, and either will be a la mode. (I don't mean a la mode beef of 
course). As I prophesied long ago, checks are the rage. At least every 
girl in the city has a black and check called shepherd's plaid. Xou can 
buy this in either silk or alpaca. I wonder if there are two c's or one in 
alpaca? Did you ever feel as if you couldn't spell? I do. But then 
the printers are supposed to know, and if one sees a wrong word of one's 
own spelling, of course we say it is a typographical error — but I wonder. 
As I was saying these little checks are " too sweet for any use " when 
made with plain, full skirts, having three rows of black velvet put round 
the skirt, with collar and cuffs of piece velvet. 

The jacket bodice opening over either a tight-fitting vest or a full 
blouse is the favorite. The jacket is fastened at the top by one button 
and slanting down open to the waist is again confined by a strap or bow ; 
below this a full white mull blouse, which falls below the waist under the 
strap, is awfully pretty for a pretty girl, whose shape is slim and ele- 
gant. (I wonder how many l's there are in elegant ; I feel awfully like a 
double-distilled dunce to-night). The skirt worn with the above spoken- 
of bodice is made plain, with a short kind of panier drapery taken 
round the top, as though in fact you took a wide scarf and draped it up 
in easy fashion, then below this, just tucked under in fact at one side, 
place a knot of looped satin ribbon — do you know I have quite a pen- 
chant for bunches of loops tucked under the over-drapery. At the side 
remember it is a finish that though simple makes quite an item in one of 
these simple dresses, and a knot of the same on the shoulder is a fashion 
that for evening wear is the prettiest of any. 

I have a great fancy for drapery, pinned on— ^fchat is if you have any 
one to pin it for you. 

I know a girl who will take a web of material in her band, and kneeling 
down will presently pin you up with such appropriateness that you look 
like a Greek statue, on the spot. The beautiful Adelaide Neilson always 
pinned on her own draperies. Certainly, it would be a little awkward in 
a ball-room if in flying round in the waltz your dress should be torn off 
your back, but for a still entertainment there is nothing like pinned on 
draperies. 

Apropos of the blouse bodice, it is perfectly charming in lace. Say you 
have on a silk dress with plain corsage, you take a handful of Brussels 
net, edged with lace, and gathering it carelessly up fasten it at the throat 
with a rose ; then take the loose portion, draw it to one side, and make 
fast to the right side of the waist by another bow, leaving a portion to 
droop over. This is called a sham blouse, and is used for demi-toilette. 

A bridal dress I saw the other day was so pretty that any one might be 
pardoned for wishing herself the bride for the sake of wearing it. First 
there was a skirt made with a heavy double rucbing of frayed out white 
silk. Over that fell a white satin skirt having one plated ruffle on the 
base. This was pleated in wide, loose pleats all round, and fell to the 
top of the silk ruche. The train, also of satin, was round and very 
full, finished by a similar rucbing of frayed silk. Over the whole was a 



Point A'len con lace dress. There was a long point falling over the right 
side of the skirt and a very short bunched up drapery at the other side, 
while the back drapery fell almost to the edge of the train. The corsage 
was pointed and very long, finished by lace, which was set in wide at 
the neck and tapered down to the base of the point. What struck me 
was the absence of all flowers. The elegant simplicity, and yet costliness 
of the robe, was a revelation of refinement. The tulle vail was worn 
over a coronal formed of the bride's hair ; that is, her hair was woven into 
a coronal ; but, of course, any bride being short of hair, could have it 
made at the wig store. 

The bridesmaids' dresses were pink crape, tucked up over pink silk, 
but of so pale a shade that even Mrs. Langtry would have approved. 

To tuck up a light material is a pretty conceit, do you understand? I 
mean taken up and fastened invisibly without any trimming, and this 
over a skirt having many tucks in it, always remembering the bunch of 
loops peeping out at one side. Silver Pen. 

GRANOLITHIC STONE. 

Desiring to find out some further particulars as to this popular artifi- 
cial stone, a member of the News Letter staff visited the temporary 
works of the company, near Market and Eighth streets, and there found 
a number of men busily engaged molding blocks and steps, of various 
sizes, for the new Odd Fellows' Hall. Granolithic was introduced into 
this city Bome three months ago by Mr. W. S. Somervell, and is a patent 
held by Messrs. Stuart & Co., of Edinburgh, Scotland. Mr. Somervell 
obtained the sole rights for the Pacific Coast, and with others under the 
title of the Granolithic Pavmg Company, soon got lots of business. The 
first contracts taken were for the California Cracker Company, corner 
of Battery and Broadway, and Parrott& Co., corner California and Bat- 
tery streets. Besides numerous smaller contracts the steps., landings and 
supporting stones are supplied by the Granolithic Paving Company for 
the new Odd Fellows' building. At the East, Granolithic has, for some 
time, been in great request. In the cities of New York, Philadelphia 
and Washington alone, 2,124,200 feet of pavement is already laid. Gran- 
olithic is composed of imported Scotch ground granite, and a specially 
prepared cement from the company's works in England. It bids fair, in 
a short time, to run all other artificial stones out of the market, as the 
best architects of Europe and America bear testimony to its merits for 
durability, beauty and economy in its various uses, such as steps, floor- 
ing, engine beds, foundations, tanks, stable floors, garden walks, and in 
fact, every purpose for which stone can be used. The Company's office is 
at 422 Montgomery street, and Mr. W. S. Somervell is the manager. 

To the Ladles. — Mrs. Lewis is now prepared to do the buying for per- 
sons in the interior, and any order received, either for Toilet, Millinery, 
Upholstery, Furniture, Jewelry, Ready-made Clothing, etc., will be 
promptly, correctly and conscientiously attended to. Str?ngers in the 
city will find that by calling at Mrs. Lewis' rooms they will gain muoh 
valuable information. A commission of fifty cents will be charged for 
attending to small orders amounting to §>10 or less, but on orders amount- 
ing to more than §10 no commission is charged. Address Mrs. P. G. 
Lewis, Rooms 28 and 29, Thurlow Block, 126 Kearny street. San Francisco. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience haB proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately af- 
ter returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be pre- 
vented. James G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 



Perfect-Fitting Domestic Paper Fashions, stylish, practical, relia- 
ble; once bought, always used. Send for catalogue to J. W. Evans, 29 
Post St., S. F. Oakland Branch— 1152 Broadway, cor. 13th st. 



See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine Krug 
Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other coun- 
terfeits. 

BETHESDR 

COOLS THE BLOOD. 



Devoid of Strong Salts— Soft and Delicious. 

j8S* Persons who indulge in vinous and alcoholic stimulants will find it the 
MOST REFRESHING, ENLIVENING and INVIGORATING draught ever provided 
in the Laboratory of Nature. 

L. CAHEN & SON, 

418 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Miss Traver and Mrs- L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 
Number of pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. May 3. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STREET. CORNER POLK. 

Prof. O. A. Ln ii t respectful ly announces that his new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bush street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office 
Hours, for Terms, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 M. t and 1 to 5 p. M. Feb. 9. 

" ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

Freucta, German and English Day and Boarding>Scbool for 
Young Ladieo and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Next term will commence July 17, 1884. Addresa MMB. E. ZEITSKA, 

[June 14.] Principal. 



juij ta, 



iWI.IKORNIA Al>\ I'.IM'ISKK. 



SOCIETY. 



July 10, us* \i! thlnai Dome bo those who know how t.. wait Out 
but torn i" with us, nt last, tad for the put Few days Ihs 

DD ill- itTMl fa U b I 1 1, " II 't. im t il ' 

■d »t out oomi btfti, the war -t dav that 

»•■ ban rai been oble to show them being, In their eutimatl 
ood end braoioff. But II wo in tin- -itv i.-l warn, what i- the . i 
■i those who nrv ruattoatinj in tot c iuntry, eipecUlly in Napa valley and 
ut the nudfic Congress Spnogal At both points tha mercury has beeu 
Daaklni iwara tha top of the thermometer, ami i« almoot 

i*t tha and of the Journey. 
T<> tin : people the Summer ■*- *>tij!* over once the Fourth of 

past, hut tin- ma to be only J oat oommanulng, For i 

variety of reasons, bnl priodnaUy owina to tne .-liinatie novelties be- 
on u ihi- aataon, people remained in town later than usual, and 
asral return to the city, which usually t.ik-s place 
diraotiy iifur the national holiday, tha trava] i« in the other direction, 
and tb< : town still continues. Thonrbre itenu in the social 

world of Trisoo then ere absolutely n>>uc. Kestivitie* are in full swing 
nt the rariona Bummer reeorta, wbloh, in Bpita of the many prophet iea 

irlv in the Spring, hare never yeeu better patronised or more 

d they ell have this year, and those of our roaidenta who, 
Prom Force >'t efrcuautanaeo, are (.-impelled to remain in town, prefer to 
let their friends remain in blissful ignorance of the fact, and do nothing 
bo advertise their presence in the city. But on the plea. I suppose, that 
misery Lives coin] tuny, several pleasant little dinners have been Given by 
; » onmbor .if those who have been detained in town, to those of their 
Frionda who have found themselves in the same predicament, and of these 
probably the pleasantest was the one given by Mrs. Haggin, who shines 
[.re eminent as a hostess, and never appears happier or to more advantage 
than when seated at the head of her own table. 
I can scarcely call to mind a year since my arrival here, that the Fourth 
' passed off ao quietly, or was so poorly observed in the city, as this last 
one. I 1 Borationa were few and far between, and what there were of 
them made but a poor and beggarly appearance. The procession scarcely 
equaled the turn-out on Memorial Day; the management of the tire- 
works was simply a disgrace to the city, and the country visitor was 
conspicuous by his absence. The rush out uf town, on tbe contrary, has 
never been known to be so great. Monterey was full to overflowing, and 
B like state of affairs was the case at Santa Cruz. Tbe presence of the 
yacht fleet added greatly to the attractions at that place, and the ball 
given on the eve of the Fourth was one of the most successful ever at- 
tempted in the village. At the Geysers a merry time was spent, the 
gaieties there extending through the entire week. At San Rafael a charni- 
1 ing dance was given on the evening following the Fourth, the Tamalpias 
scarcely finding room for all the would-be guests on the occasion. At 
SkagRS? Springs, Glenwood, Napa Soda Springs, Paso Robles, Paraiso, 
Camp Feltun, Saucelito, etc., the attractions for the holiday week were 
I n i. <i and numerous, and at each place the difficulty was to find accom- 
modations for the crowds of visitors attracted. 
Apropos of Saucelito, the members of the Pacific Yacht Club, deter- 
; mined that the San Francisco Club shall not have it all their own way, 
have placed their club-house at the disposal of the ladies who have the 
welfare of the little Episcopal Church there at heart, and on next Wed- 
nesday evening a fescival will be held in it for the purpose of raising 
funds to build a rectory. An attractive programme will be presented, 
but the pity of it is that the greatest attraction of all of these Summer 
nights, "Moonlight on the water," will be wanting. 

Battery K has returned safe and sound from its laborious march into 
and through the Yosemite Valley, the return being as equally triumphal 
a progress as tbe going forth, although it did not include Monterey, aa 
was fondly hoped. It is rumored that the delightful hops at the Presidio 
will be resumed again at an early day, and in the meantime the weekly 
band playing there attracts a large attendance at the reservation on each 
recurring Friday. At the Navy Yard festivities progress in a mild way, 
but a dance d'adieu to the Monongahela is, I believe, on the tapis. 

It seems only the other day that I noticed in these columns the de- 
parture of the Sillems for Europe, whither they went in the almost for- 
lorn hope of restoring Mr. Sillem's health, and how fallacious that hope 
was has been proved by the lately received intelligence of his death, 
which took place in London last week. By his death 'Frisco loses 
another of its oldest citizens, his residence here dating, I am told, from 
away back early in the fifties. I understand that bis late partner, Mr. 
Alfred Goddefroy, intends closing out their business here, and that ac- 
complished will make his future home in some of the older cities of 
the Old World, and thus we shall lose another of the old land-marks, or 
rather old-timers of San Francisco, which has actually grown up during 
his residence in it. What interesting reading a volume of such so- 
ciety reminiscences of early days as he could give would be to those he 
leaves behind him. 

Joe Tildeu, fat, fair and forty ! has returned to our longing gaze from 
his pilgrimage to Kanakadorn, pleased with his trip, but still more 
pleased to get back here again. He has been most warmly welcomed by 
his friends, especially those who delight to style themselves Bohemians, 
a special "Jinks" being in contemplation to celebrate the event. Ned 
McFarlane, Madame Zeitska and her daughter also came by the same 
steamer. The only other distinguished arrival to note this week has 
been that of ex-Senator Sharon, who returned from the East this morn- 
ing, and coming direct from the seat of war no doubt he will be exten- 
sively interviewed on the prospects of the various Presidential candi- 
dates, who seem to be multiplying daily. News from the East reports 
the progress of Mr. James Flood towards recovery from his recent se- 
vere illness, and that his return may be looked for in about two weeks. 
It is probable that Mr. W. P. Dewey will also ere long turn his foot- 
steps in this direction. Felix. 

If you want anything in the way of Japanese Goods, go to Marsh & 
Co.'s, No. 025 Market street. Twelve years' residence in Japan has given 
them unusual facilities. 

Avoid seeking favors of any one, aud you wilt succeed much better 
than one who is always beseeching some one's patronage. 



The Taber Dry Plate should be in the studio of every photographer 
who makes any eff< rt to keep up with the scientific development of 
the times or to produce work which can make any pretense of ranking as 
first-class in the world of art. Its great sensitiveness enables an operator 
to secure rich, clear negatives of moving or stationary objects, by the 
electric, or any strong light, and without the aid of the sun. In addition 
to its celerity it has also tbe advantage of enabling the operator to catch 
the most pleasing expression in taking children, nervous persons, or ani- 
mals. It is for sale by Taber, No. 8 Montgomery street. 

Col. A. Andrews, the Commissioner appointed to represent California 
at the New Orleans World's Fair, has just issued an address to the people 
of this State, calling upon them to contribute funds to insure a proper 
representation of our resources and industries. He has also appoint* d 
one banker in each county in the State a Bub-commissioner to receive 
contributions, and it is to be hoped that the response will be liberal. 



A PUFF FOR PRIESTS. 

To a oynic fan . , steful than a tine, EataJ apionmlo. 

For a oynio U ha who, oonacfoua uf the dog to bla own nature, l 
tea Ma Fallon man expoaa tha hog in theirs, whan ba aafaaa thorn by the 

nd worries them. Now nothing elaa bringi "-it tbe hog tal 
humanity Id bo frank an nnduwoJse i . raging apldamlo 

Aal jtlo onolors - ly or black imall pox. Bnman nati plnmaa 

own baolc ovsr its possession of an amiable quality 
'" which it bi ■ :. una " humanity " a-* a naat Implication thai ft 

aujoya a monopoly thereof, although don and dlelcej birdi di play tha 

This virtue manifaata Itsefi partly In inbsoriptioDS to h 
and prevention- of- cruelty looioties, bnl more In oounaeling othai 
b I ascribe, and chiefly In piona vain glory. Your cynic known boa i 
" ™" 8V * rtM hi of the sort called by the Orientals "bosh" rendered 
" rot" in our ruder mother tongue. Your cynic know-* that tin- imooth- 
eat cuticle of eivili/.-d man, being scratched, ex pones a howling *n\ 
that thia wild beast is overlain in fact by n coat (not " orost "1 of From h 
polish, the exact thinness of coach-varnish. Your cynic d«l1VM an un 
natural joy in seeiug this coating crack and scale off, which it will 'In 
(he avers) in times of epidemic to that extent, its Hakes conceal the 
ground. The cynic is then wont to perch him on a fence, writhing his 
legs in ecstacy, and relieving his feelings with pertinent crios. To auch 
exercises oontempoiary events at Marseilles and Toulon now invite the 
cynic, and it is quite possible that ere two years be out he may be in a 
position to indulge his peculiar humor without going so far from home. 
But the uttermost bitter of such visitations is commended to the lips of 
your Protestant clergymen, who then " feel a call " to get up and leave 
— "duty to their families " prohibits their imperiling too precious liveo, 
while your Romish priest sticks to his post like a good fellow and In 
vidiouB Comparison. 

ARE WE DOOMED? 

That there is a Special Providence, is distinctly proved by the career 
of these United States of America, which have been on the horrid 
verge of destruction once every four years, during a century, and have 
been miraculously saved every time. Once more they hang upou the 
ragged edge, and once more are we convinced that the Lord will put forth 
his strong right arm and snatch us from ruin. As the Democratic Con- 
vention has not, at this writing, nominated, we are only aware aa yet that 
one of the Lord's arms is this time named " Blaine ; " next November 
we shall learn whether this " Blaine " is the strong right arm referred 
to, or the weaker one that is left. Until November, we are doomed to 
lie stretched upon the rack of despair ; for being ourselves of feeble mind, 
we are wont to look up to Omniscience, incarnate in the public press, for 
guidance. For four mortal months we shall be invited by the Demo 
cratic Omniscience to contemplate the overthrow of our political virtue 
in the election of Blaine, while the Republican Omniscience will make 
our flesh creep at the devastation impending over our institutions in the 
election of— call him, for the moment, Jones. It is a painful thing, in 
these trying times, to possess only a feeble intellect like ours. Why have 
we not a bloody, bold and resolute genius like that that flames in the 
Chronicle/ Why, why, are we not a burning and a blazing soul, like 
that that flames in the Examiner? Nay, 'twere something to be even the 
tallow dip that flares and gutters and smells bad in the Bulletin than thus 
to gnash our teeth in the dark, as we have to do. See how great a thing 
it is to have brains !— massive convolutions of "grey substance," like 
Daniel Webster, or the Evening Post, or Wm. M. Seward, or the Morninff 
Call / Being weak in our wits, we shall not know till November whether 
these United States are destined to be wiped miserably off the face of 
the earth on the 4th of March following, or not. But we rather fear 
they are fated to be wiped out. 

A new and select private boarding house, known as the ,; Berk- 
shire," has just been opened on Jones street, near Post, by Mrs. Hard- 
ing, a lady of great experience. The house is magnificently equipped and 
furnished, and offers to its guests all the refinement of a private residence, 
in conjunction with the social pleasures arising from a larger family cir- 
cle. The house contains one hundred and forty rooms, all of them being 
well-lighted and thoroughly ventilated. All tbe latest improvements in 
building have been availed of, and the result is the greatest measure of 
comfort and convenience. The table of the Berkshire will be its strong 
point. Mrs. Harding is an experienced and accomplished caterer, and 
she intends that her table shall be kept laden with every delicacy of the 
season, prepared in such a manner as to tempt the poorest appetite. The 
success of the new establishment may be considered assured. 

Pacific Congress Springs.— This delightful Summer resort has been 
thoroughly renovated throughout, and is now open to the public. There 
is no more pleasant place to spend a few weeks than this, and Mr. W. 
H. Stedman does his utmost to make his guests comfortable and at home. 
There is excellent trout fishing to be had in the immediate vicinity, and 
pleasant picnic parties are constantly being gotten up. The water from 
the springs has so many healthful qualities, and is so well-known here, 
that comment from us is needless. Rooms can be secured by addressing 
W. H. Stedman, Saratoga, California. Stages connect at Los Gatos 
with 8:30 a. M. and 2:30 p. M. trains, S. P. C. R. R. Through fare, $2 50. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER ^.ND 



July 12, 1881 



WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN. 

Whnm first we love, you know, we seldom wed. 

Time rules us all. And life, indeed, is not 
The thing we planned it out ere hope was dead. 

And then, we women cannot choose our lot. 
Much must he borne which it is hard to bear; 

Much given away which it were sweet to keep. 
God help us all ! who need, indeed. His care. 

And yet, I know, the Shepherd loves His sheep. 
My little boy begins to babble now 

Upon my knee his earliest iofant prayer. 
He has his father's eager eyes, I know. 

And, they say, too, his mother's sunny hair. 
But when he sleeps and smiles upon my knee. 

And I can feel his light breath come and go, 
I think of one (Heaven help and pity me! ) 

Who loved me, whom I loved, long ago. 
Who might have been * * * ah, what I dare not think ! 

We all are changed, God judges for us best. 
God help us do our duty, and not shrink, 

And trust in Heaven humbly for the rest. 
But blame us women not, if some appear 

Too cold at times, and some too gay and light. 
Some griefs grow deep. Some woes are hard to bear. 

Who knows the Past ? and who can j udge us right ? 
Ah, were we judged by what we might have been, 

And not by what we are, too apt to fall ! 
My little child — he sleeps and smiles between 

These thoughts and me. In Heaven we shall know all! 

— Owen Meredith. 

GENTLEMEN. 

There is, perhaps, no term more completely misunderstood and more 
grievously misapplied than the term gentleman ; most particularly is this 
the case in California. Basing our opinions upon ideas formed and ex- 
periences gained during a long residence on the Pacific Coast, were we 
asked to say who in California was a gentleman or what constituted one, 
we should be forced to seek an answer in asking in turn who was not, and 
what did not constitute one. In no other way could we reply without 
giving a list and a definition, the one as long as the male census, and the 
other as comprehensive in its inclusiveness as it would be bewildering in 
the ramifications of its descriptions. Now, to begin with, we have not 
the slightest objection to any man's considering himself a gentleman, or 
that his friends and companions should so designate him. If it makes 
him happy, let it. This is a free country, and people can call themselves 
pretty much what they like. But it is the utter senselessness of the thing 
that riles us. The word gentleman has a distinct meaning of its own. It 
is not synonymous with " man," any more than officer is Bynonymous 
with " soldier." Each, in its own way, is more than the other. Every 
crentleman is a man, but every man is not a gentleman ; just as every 
officer is a soldier, but every soldier is not an officer. In short, to be log- 
ical, in neither instances are the terms convertible. Yet, we'll be blessed 
if one wouldn't think they were in California. In considering really 
what is a gentleman, we will leave out of the question two misleading 
and erroneous ideas. Let us discard, first, all such rubbish as " born " 
gentlemen — a condition, in nine cases out of ten, an inherent contradic- 
tion ; and second, all such rot as that man is a greater title than gentle- 
man, for we don't believe it. A " man " may be a scoundrel, but a " gen- 
tleman " never could be one while he remained a gentleman. And there 
is the whole point. 

By a gentleman, according to our acceptance of the term, we don't 
mean the too commonly accepted one in other regions, viz: A fashiona- 
bly dressed dandy with dancing-school manners, and an affectation of 
servility in his regard for " the ladies." Nor do we apply the term to an 
arrogant snob, with a big house and many servants, a fast team and a 
mistress ; a man whose vulgar ostentation and love of display is only 
equaled by his self-applauding conversation and overbearing demeanor to 
those with less money than himself. Nor yet to the pompous scholar or 
scientist, whose iueffable conceit is only second to his superciliousness 
with those he supposes to be unlearned ; nor to the brow-beating, loud- 
mouthed lawyer, no matter what his practice, how fine his office or how 
large his fees ; nor the famous physician or celebrated surgeon, whose 
self-importance shows itself in a surliness of manner and roughness of 
language to patieuts from whom he accepts pay ; nor the swaggering 
Army officer, or Jack Tar Naval man, whose ideas of greatness never 
overstep the barrier of the parade-ground or " board ship." To none of 
these do we apply the term. Much rather would we to the barbers, the 
car-conductors, the bar-keepers and the corner grocerymen, whom every 
day we hear called gentlemen by those who are ignorant of the word's 
intent. On the contrary the man whom we call "gentleman" needs no 
credential but heart, no attribute but an ever present respect and regard 
for the feelings of others. We want no dictionary definitions to guide us 
in the matter, no outward semblance of wealth or social position. 



A BENEVOLENT ENTERPRISE. 
Jones—" Why, Smith, have you changed your business again?" 
Smith— ' J Yes, and I have struck it this time sure." 
" What is it now ? " "I am a purveyor of mosquitoes." 

"Merry on us! What's that?" 

"I suppose you know that everybody is out of town now or supposed 
to be." " Yes." 

" You also know that first-class people in town have to show a coat of 
tan or something tj indicate that they have been off summering, and have 
only run into the city to shop or attend to some other necessary business." 

"Of course." ''Well, a good quality ot tan can't be produced artiti- 
cally, but the tan is not necessary if the skin only has enough mosquito 
bites." "Well?" 

" My business is to furnish can't-get-aways with Al. first-quality, gilt- 
edged, live mosquitoes, three for a quarter, every one warranted to bite at 
least ten times during the night. The next morning my customers look 
as if they had been staying all summer at a 20-a-day hotel." 



BANKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,730,- 
000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Reserve Fund. $250,000. Southeast 
comer California and Sansome streets. Head Office— 2S Cornhill, London. 
Branches — Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and'Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen Company; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and New Zealand 
— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bank. 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WIS. ALTORD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier | B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Cashier 

, AOBNTS : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank, 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent iu London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifi Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt .Lake, Cincinnati, 
Port'and, O. , Los Angeles, London, Duhlin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno. Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and :ill cities in Italy and Switzerland, 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, Daniel Cat- 
lagrhaii. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directors. — D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, Isaac Wormaer, James 
Phelan, James Meffitt, N. Van Bergen, James II. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— London : Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuinan 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available iu Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital. $2,100,000. 

San Fraucisco Office. 424 California street; Loudon Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers — Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pise Streets. 

Loudon Office, 3 Ang-el Court ; New York Agrents, J. W. Sel- 
igman &. Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, §0,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P. N. Ltlientdal, C ashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agrency at New York. 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 
Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
e lers' Credits. Nov. 8. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July. 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DI RECTORS— David Farquharson (Pi evident) , Robert F. Bunker ( V ice- President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Eaatpn [Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. u. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph K. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux [J uly I2.| Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

Oharles Orocker, R. 0. Woolworth, Wm. H, Orocker. 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS 

322 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

C lurry on a General Banking Business. Correspondents 
j in the principal cities Of the Eastern States itn d in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President. Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. J ones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Leihbank,No.526 Calilorniastreet,San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors. — L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Chaa. Kohler, Edw. liruse, George H. Eggers, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Peter Spreckels, A. E. Heclit. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorneys, 
JARBOfc. & HARRISON. May IB. 



.i.il.v IS, 1884 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SUNBEAMS. 



Ex-Pounder. 

iy » «ir. K- ..f the few 



Who domioata tin- orowd, 
Concluded tint they'd t.ik.' the nun 
thought h poof tad proud, 
An.l tost liini 1-y ■ trick M two, 

■ l»i' kind "f (ttulf 

i 1. 11. .w « bo w long 

I Ud ,iveii them the bluff. 



H« was a uriitl.-. quiet man, 
Who bun'l muoh I 

l atnuog tin- f-'lk-« in town, 
Hi- hair ni itr—kod with gray. 

Nobody know bin vcrv wril, 
rved « .»•. bi ; 
And -till in -ill bli walks a nil way* 
No fault ooold »ny •*©. 

Ttu-y triad liiiu in all lorfe «>f vrays, 
l'li-y work.-- 1 iii vaxiooi pranks. 
"I da not n&oke or drink Df chew," 

IK' said, and imlled bin thanks. 
"Than what in thunder da yon do?" 

Spoke "lit nii« man .iloml. 

"I nook the itnffln' oat of fools!" 

And then he scooped the crowd. 

N> u York News. 
A Studio Secret.— Great Painter "They ate not imaginary. All my 
acrobatic studies are fnmi Nature. " t'litir '"Hut that picture of a cir- 
cus man Handing on bia hoad? u '* It is from a model." "A model! 
How under the oinopy could any model pose in that position long enough 
i '.' " "Simplest ttiiiu; in the world." "1 confess uiy brains 
inadequate to solve that problem." "I painted him standing on Ins feet, 
and then turned the canvas upside down." I'hil. Call. 

Slips of the Tongue.— EdHh— " You remember I was unable to re- 
■nond to your request to Bins the other niifut, Mr. Shyfellow, on account 
of a cold." Shyfellow -" Yen ; I hope the cold is better." Edith — "It 
is almost well. I cured it simply by avoiding all draughts for a few days, 
and if yon wish I will sing for you now." Shyfellow (noticing that the 
piano standi in a direct draught)—" Shall I close the windows?" 

—Phil. Call. 



These sandwiches and kegs of beer, 
These pickled beets and pies severe, 
Which soon will quickly disappear? 
What mean these signs ? Bend low 
your ear- 



Why do the busy little ants 
Kick up thi-ir tiny heels and dance 
With undisguised hilarity ? 

Why do the youth with pretty pants, 
Now r >und Vm cast a furtive glance, 
Lest custard pies by some mischance The picnic season now is here, 

Attempt familiarity ? [cheer— With all its jocularity. 

What mean these signs of goodly — New York Journal. 

A tramp stopped at a house in main street, the other day, and asked 
f.r something to eat. " Which do you like best ? " asked the hired girl ; 
'■ steak or chop? " The tramp hesitated a minute and then replied "chop." 
" Step right this way," said the hired girl. " Here's the ax, and there's 
the wood-pile." — Burlington Free Press. 

The recent developments in banking circles in New York lead to the 
belief that the youm,' man whoae early exploits were so touchingly de- 
scribed by the poet in the following Hues, prospered in his later years, 
and became president of a bank in the Empire city: 
He took her faocy when he came; 

He took her hand ; he took a kiss ; 
He took no notice of the shame 

That warmed her happy cheek at this. 
He took to coming afternoons ; 

He took an oath he'd near deceive ; 
He took her father's silver spoons. 
And after that he took his leave. 

— Finance and Mining News. 
A physician says that everybody and everything needs relaxation. 
Any organ will become impaired by constant use. The M. D. certainly 
has forgotten that there are such things as hand organs in the universe. 

— Yonkers 1 Statesman. 
There will be a Methodist skating rink and a Baptist skating rink at 
Chatauqua this season, but no beer saloon of either denomination. Were 
there a few of these there it is quite probable some of the skaters would 



rink quite ofteu. Please pass the ice. 



-Oil City Blizzard. 



If Logan's grammar isn't good, 

We see no' point in that; 
It merely indicates that he 
Was once a Democrat. 
A correspondent asks the best way to pack eggs. The best way is 
to boil thirty-live seconds, remove shell, flavor contents with salt and pep- 
per, and eat while hot. # — Bismarck Tribune. 

An Otsego man has just received an order from New Orleans for a 
large supply of rolling-pins. This corroborates the report that New Or- 
leans husbands are getting into the habit of staying out late. 

"Waiter, I saw your thumb in this soup as you were bringing it to 
me." " Oh, sir, you're kind, I'm sure, sir, but it's of no consequence. It 
wasn't hot enough to hurt much, sir." — Old Joke. 

Matthew Arnold says he was particularly impressed with "the talk- 
ingness and engagingness" of the American women." Mr. Arnold's flat- 
teringness is quite embarrassingness and altogether pleasingness. 

— N. Y. News. 

In putting up your screen doors and windows be very particular to 
have a little hole in one corner, so that the flies can go out doors when 
they get tired of being inside. — Boston Post. 

The Chicago News devotes space to "The Legs of Great Men." An 
article on the legs of Chicago women would be interesting -that is, if 
their legs are as large as their feet. 

"Is Mr. Harris' family among the bon ton? "asked a Btranger in a 
town up North. " Well, I should say so. Why, they've made the Har- 
ris-tocracy of the place." — Merchant. 

" Hard workers are never troubled with insomnia," says a physician. 
Very true ; look at the hard-worked policeman. 



THE HEATHEN AT HOME. 
Sunday In San Francisco saTTM III ample diet of D«Dtal pabulum. 
This oo belUfen in 

mown religious erted, it in unduly targe proj 

o! irabeHeeen men, women and ohtldren who baTa do bead for 

ml to whom their U oknown quantity, Let ni Dot be 

mtsunderet 1. Wa do col beUere In ill the prai tiolng ■ end pi i 

of tin' moat rigorous religionist*, who shudder wltfa real or prel 
loathing at the blemishes which they sea so glaringly in their more world 
Iv brother or sister. Their peevish and splenetic melancholy renders them 
morose end gloomy. They ire spotless and stainless, untarnished by the 

Wicked ways of the world, and in them is our only salvation. Their 
habits are stern and precise; there in a let us pray sort of appearance anon 

their innooent moae. To smile would In- a sin. These are the men who, 
under the cloak of peace and piety, do far more real barm than good in 
the cause of religion. They attend their ohttrohes and bold theii pi 

I'liey invoke blessings, upon the miserable heathen savages for 
whom they collect money; but they show no balance sheets of receipts 
and expenditures, or acknowledgments from cannibal kings that the dol- 
lars, piu-cuahions, pen-wipers and prayer-books have found their way 
into his dominions. Is there not work nearer home ! ( >nr churches on a 
Sunday are almost empty, though a man may perhaps be spiritually 
saved without such an outward, accurate atteution to bis re- 
ligious feelings. He should not either be debarred from his 
freedom and fresh air in the country, away from the scenes 
of his week's work. A good day's rest and recreation is more likely to 
make a man think solicitously and seriously than if he listens to dry and 
prosy sermons, badly written and worse read. But there are things hap 
peniug every day of the week, even on Sundays, here, right in our 
midst, before our eyes and at our gates, which call for all the 
energy and enthusiasm so openly displayed by the pious and the holy. 
Cock-tights, dog-rights, robberies, blaspheming on the streets, are 
all a part of Sunday's doings. Bagnios and brothels open their 
doors and ply their trade within a few blocks of the sacred build- 
ings. In our slums and sideways are the hotbeds of crime, where vice 
is propagated and takes root to grow and spread with alarming rapidity. 
How little is done for our heathen at home ! There are many people 
working good from evil quietly and unostentatiously. Nobody hears of 
them, for they do not boast, brag and bluster of their intimacy with 
the Lord like these blathant speculators who trade in religion and make 
a business of it because it pays and pays well. It would be surprising, 
if their cloak were thrown aside, that those who give might see to whom 
they give and what becomes of their gifts. Then, perhaps, they might 
insist that our first and more immediate care and concern is with our 
heathen at home. 

MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 



The undersigned, having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of aoove company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck, all Numbers ; 
Hydraulic, all Numbers ; 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, aud a complete assortment of All Qualitie, 
281-Inch DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 16 ozs. inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

QUICKSILVER 

FBO« NEW ALKf ADEN MINES, Santa Clara Comity, Cal. 

tf3T Prompt Shipment. Lowest Price for Purest Uniform Quality. 



P. O. BOX 2,548. 



B. RANDOL, 

320 Sansome at-, San Francisco. 



JAMES 0. STEELE & CO., 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS, 

Agents for BICOKD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS, 

635 Market Street San Frauclsco, Cal. 

PALACE HOTEL. June 24. 



HUM30LDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

NO. 18 GEAHY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

Incorporated November 2-fttb, 1969. — Allolph C. Weber, 
President; Ernst Brand, Secretary. Loans at Low Rates. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. -For the half-year 
ending June 30th, 1884, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY has declared a Dividend on term deposits at the rate of four 
and thirty-two one-hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent, per annum, and pay- 
able on and after the 1st day of July, 1884, By order. 
[June 21.] GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 619 Clay street, (Incorporated 
July 23, 1857.)— For the six months ending June 30, 1884, the Board of Directors 
declared a dividend on all deposits at the rate of four and thirty-three and one- 
third (4 33 .\- 100) percent per annum, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1884. 
[June 28.] CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second at. Jan. 12. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

Analytical ami t'oiisnltlils Chemist, 360 Fourth street, 
San Francisco. July 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1884. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

The smoothness of the performance is the charm of The Rajah ae 

played by the Madison Square Theater Company. The individual act- 
ing i» so clever and the ensemble so satisfactory, that no desire is felt to 
analyze the play. If Mr. Young's dramatic effort was in the hands of 
incompetent people, its illustration would merely serve to emphasize its 
flaccidity. The play is really without a backbone. In its locale it is full 
of ludicrous blunders, indication a total ignorance of English life. In its 
curious, and I must say rather ingenious blending of humor and melo- 
drama, it almost touches extremes of exaggeration. But by the really 
admirable acting of the actors and actresses, the play's faults are dimmed 
and its good qualities brightened, to an extent producing both amuse- 
ment and a disinclination to criticism. 

• * * * * 

On Monday, July 14th, The Bijou Opera Company will appear at the 
Baldwin in Orpheus and Euri/dice. This is an adaptation, by Max Free- 
man, of Offenbach's Orphee avx Enfers. It is conceded on all sides that 
this first opera bouffe of the immortal Offenbach is, musically, his best 
work. It is not as ambitious as some of his later works, but it more 
thoroughly breathes the spirit of true burlesque, and it is naturally devoid 
of all reminiscence— something which in an increasing ratio characterized 
all Offenbach's subsequent productions. Orphee aux Enfers is thirty years 
old. It gave birth to French opera bouffe. It has never been presented 
either as a translation, or as an adaptation, in English, in this country, 
until arranged by Max Freeman. The libretto presented so many diffi- 
culties that no one cared to assume the task of arranging it. There is 
nothing the English language is capable of which will replace the finesse 
and wit of French humor. To preserve the original humor it must be to 
some extent burlesqued. This is what Max Freeman has done, and, 
judging by Eastern report, the work has been well done. This produc- 
tion at The Bijou had a run of one hundred nights. The scenery, cos- 
tumes and mise-en-scene are said to be superb. The costumes for San 
Francisco are all new. A friend of mine vouches for this. He was pres- 
ent when the material for the fifty costumes was purchased— seven yards! 
The chorus girls are said to be pretty and well qualified to wear the few 
buttons and pins allowed them by the costumer. The principals are well 
known, and comprise Digby Bell, Laura Joyce, Augusta Roche, Marie 
Vanoni, Ida Mulle and many others. 

***** 

Monte Cristo is in its last nights. At present writing no announcement 

is made for the coming week for the California Theatre. It is reported 

that the Monte Cristo Company would have produced some other play 

had the principals been able to agree upon a selection, but this proved 

impossible. 

***** 

The acrobatic act of the three Herberts in the Dei'Ws Auction is superior 
to anything of the kind ever seen h«re on stage or in circus ring. Diffi- 
cult feats of tumbling are not merely attempted; they are actually per- 
formed. The burlesque trapezs act induces a belief in the indestructibil- 
ity of human bones. Martinetti is a wonderful contortionist. The Black 
Raven is announced to follow the Devil's Auction. 

* * * * » 

Warde's Virginius throbs with masculinity. It is a grand and digni- 
fied impersonation. A nobler one does not exist on our stage. The 
dignity, despair, pathos, paternal pride and manliness of the character are 
magnificently delineated. The reading of the lines is marvelously intelli- 
gent — the emphases are admirably applied, bringing out in bold relief 
beauties that other actors have left undiscovered. Warde's voice, when 
not obscured by hoarseness, is clear and distinct. It attunes itself to 
emotion, retaining iis sincerity of tone. His facial play, without being of 
extreme sensitiveness, is vivid and expressive. The scenes in which 
Warde excels are, the first scene in act II, where Virginius gives bis 
daughter, Virgicia, to Icilius, with the words : " Icilius, I do betroth 
her to thee ;" the last scene of act III, which brings the bad news from 
Koine -the line : " I will be so patient," spoken with an effort to control 
himself, telling strongly on the audience ; the whole forum scene, a mas- 
terly mingling of dignity and paternal pathos, and the last scene of the 
play, where Virgiuins throttles Appius Claudius, and sees the imaginary 
figure of his daughter before him : " Brave girl ! Keep thine eye fixed ; 
let it not wink ; look on !" Kate Forsythe is a lovable and interesting 
Virginia. The sweetness of the character is pictured in an irresistible 
manner. It is a shame that two such artists as Warde and Kate Forsythe 
should be compelled to waste their time in stage work of a Lynwood 
character. It is to be regretted that they have appeared under such con- 
ditions that smvess has been well nigh impossible. Warde deserves a 
prominence on the American stage shared by but Booth and Sheridan. 
That he does not possess it, is purely a question niinanagemsnt. Qi Kate 
Forsythe, it may be said that there are but few more charming anil con- 
scientious actresses. 

***** 

At the Tivoli, Audran's Gillette is being sung. This is the initial pro- 
duction in this country of Audran's latest operetta. It is producer in 
the usual good style characteristic of the Tivoli. The orchestra and 
chorus were very effective and the principal-; very acceptable. The plot 
of Gilldte is amusing aud the music very tuneful. 

* * * s- * 
Henry Heyman sends pleasant news i.f his trip to the Hawaiian 

Islands. On the *21st of June he gave a concert, which was highly suc- 
cessful, both artistically ami pecuniarily. He subsequently played at an 
entertaiumeut given by Queen Ka'pialani for the benefit of the lepers. 
Maestro Heyman has become quite chummy with all of the Royal family, 
and a return to the simplicity of Republican institutions aud the fra- 
ternity of mere commoners, will draw from him many a sigh. He leaves 
Honolulu by the steamer of the 15th of July. 

***** 

In a dramatic combination that recently appeared in the city there was 
an actor whose whole stock in trade was u very natural and hearty tone 
of laughter. This is all the more a matter of comment, as the average 



actor who can portray pretty much all phases of sentiment is a bad fail- 
ure when his part calls for audible laughter. Aside from the various un- 
canny noises produced by laughing actors, their facial expressions, while 
undergoing the process of cacchination, are painful to witness. They 
look uneasy, self-conscious and strained, as though the effort hurt them. 
To be obliged to laugh on the stage is to most actors an ordeal of quite 
startling proportions. A player may, with the slightest exercise of his 
nifts, reduce an audience to tears, and yet be the most hopelessly absurd 
aud unreal laugher alive. It is a fair conclusion that jollity is more diffi- 
cult to simulate than sorrow. Beauclerc. 

MRS LANGTRY SURPRISED. 
It may seem strange to many that the Jersey Lily was not pho- 
tographed while in San Francisco. The reason was that Mrs. Lang- 
try being under an agreement to an Eastern photographer could not 
have her picture taken in San Francisco without forfeiting a large sum 
of money. She did not, however, leave this Coast without leaving be- 
hind her an excellent portrait. Taber, our leading photographer, with 
his usual enterprise sent an artist to the Yosemite Valley to take an in- 
stantaneous photograph of the Jersey Lily, and two excellent negatives 
were secured, one as she was getting into the stage coach and another 
as she sat on the hotel verandah. She was afterward informed of the 
fact, and considered it an excellent joke. 

The Telegraph HIU Observatory, together with its cable railroad, 
is now open to the public. As a place of amusement it has no equal in 
the neighborhood of this city. The view of San Francisco and its sur- 
roundings which can be gained from this commanding hight is simply 
magnificent, and, with this elegant resort crowning the top of the hill, 
it can now be enjoyed leisurely and under the most favorable conditions. 
An excellent concert, under the management of Walter & Co., assists to 
render the scene more enjoyable, aLd refreshments, at city prices, are 
kept at hand. 

Ladies and gentlemen who possess histrionic abilities which they 
wish to develop, will do well to remember that Mrs. Julia Melville-Sny- 
der, corner of Hyde and McAllister streets, is a distinguished and suc- 
cessful teacher of all that pertains to the lyric and dramatic stage. Those 
who secure ber assistance can rely upon it that they have taken the first 
step up the ladder of fame. 

An English lady, Miss Prettyman, staying at the Grand Hotel, 
Paris, had a miraculous escape. Suffering from an acute attack of ty 
phoid fever, she threw herself out of a window while delirious, and must 
inevitably have been killed but for the fact of her falling upon a horse 
which was being groomed in the courtyard below. 

Our French fellow-citizens will celebrate the fall of the Bastile on 
Monday, July 14th, with appropriate literary exercises at the Grand Opera 
House in the afternoon, and a fete, at Woodward's Gardens, the same 

evening. 

The widow of the late Captain Webb, who lost his life in the Niagara 
Rapids, is now acting as cashier at the Whirlpool Rapids Park, close by 
the scene of ber husband's fatal plunge. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Lessee and Manager. Mr. M. B. LEAVrTT | Acting Manager Mr. JAY RIAL 

^" TO-NIGHT. Matinee Saturday, at 2 v. H. Theatre Crowded Nightly bv 
an Enthusiastic Audience! GALLA -HER, GILM^RE & GARDNER'S 
DEVIL'S AUCTION! 

MR CFIAS. H. TALE Manager 

Gorgeous Spectacular Effects! Beautiful Ballets! Novel Specialties! 
Monday Next— New Specialties. The Famous Staircase Bund The Funniest 
Musical Idea Extiut. A New and Brilliant Ballet Dhertiseinent. Bright Costumes. 
Bewitching Dancing. July 13. 

BALDWIN'S LAST NIGHT! 

AL. HAY MAN Lessee ami Manager 

LAST NIGHT OF THE 

MADISOtf-SQTJABE THEATRE COMPANY! 

In the Successful Comedy, 

THE RAJAH! 

With the Sumptuous Scenery, Elegant Cast, eic. Last Matinee Saturday, July 12th. 

Monday, July nth -BIJOU BURLESQUE CO., in ORPHEUS AND ERUDTCE. 
Scats on sale this morning. July 12. 



TELEGRAPH HILL 

OBSERVATORY AND CONCERT HALL! 
WALTER & CO., Proprietors. 

Engagement Fxtraordinary of tile HAMPTON COLI/iSE STUDENTS' VOCAL 
CONCEIU' COMPANY! Commencing THURSDAY, July 10th, ami Every Evening 
during the week. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday Afternoon— Monster win: rt, 
by the Famous HUNGARIAN GIPSY UAND ami uther artists 

gg^* Everything First-' lass. July 12. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near .Hnrhet.—K relink Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Managers.— This Evening, and until further notice, Audran's Latest 
Comic Opera, in three ActB, 

Gillette ! 

Will be produced with Elegant Scenery, Costumes and Appointments, for the First 
Time in America. Crand churns ami Orchestra, and an Excellent Cast. 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved seats, 5U cents. July 12. 

MILLS SEMINARY. 

THE NEXT TERM OF THIS WELL-KNOWN INSTITUTION 
Opens Wednesday, July 30, 1SS4. 



For further information address 
[July 5.] 



MRS. C. T. MILLS, 
Mills Seminary P. O., Alanuda Co., Cal. 



July 13, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



SPORTING. 



Yachting. Th# 3onU Croi trip and the regatta in Moi 
tin Ptorifle Yacht Club, which extended from tin* morning of the 2nd to 
the ■ronton, "f Uie Sifa Inat . prortooa yachting event* in Calf. 

iiTiiia iratara. In the limited space ut oar diepoeaj it i-. impoaaible to do 
the double event joetion. Never before did anon a Heel pus through the 
Raada. The oompariaon refer* to (In- number and eixe of the or&ft, and 
had the fleet aailaa, inataad oi being towed out <>f the harbor, the effect 
would have added Increaaad brilliance to the event. For the Brat time a 
raoa hw» been held in the noble Baj of ttooterey. Ten yean hanoe 
wa hope to recount the doing* "f sixteen, instead ol >i\ boata, and that 
the imalleal in the Seal may measure seventy feet, < tne drawback to the 
ornlse was the splitting "i" the Beet into two parts, making almost useless 
genera] oompariaon and oriticism. Whoever i<« to blame for the mistake 
doubtless regrets t!.e mot ;<* Ucenh- us we da The Aggie, Lt'rline and 
Halcyon lead the van, and the Aggie won. Her sailing time was 7:24:18. 
The I.nrlinc crosaed the line ut her side in r»8:10. Between this pair the 
the cruise was made. In light winds the Aggie drew away from 
her keel competitor. When the breeze freshened the Lurline overhauled 
ber companion, being reported more than once on even terms. The 
Halcyon was not in racing trim, both the Aggie and Lurline passing her 
without difficulty. Her actual sailing time hemi* '-'■J minutes slower than 
the Aggie's. Mr. Macdnnough sailed hie own boat ami bandied her per- 
fectly. The rear of the Beet was lead across the line by the Lady Mine, 
300 close up, the Nellie and Fleur de Lis following upon the heels 
of the big pair. The dilfereixe in time between the four being only ten 
tniantes. Close and remarkable sailing in a run of 65 miles. The Nellie 
md honors, and at one time in the race had the Lady Mine and 
i era! miles astern ; but going out to sea about ten miles she met 
light winds when near Santa Cruz, and saw both the big boats inshore 
danc away From her in a spanking breeze. The Flenr de Lis and Annie 
fuUnwad in the N'ellie's wake from start to finish. The Ariel made a very 
poor show, being nearly an hour behind the Annie. The following table 
gives the time aud corrected time of each competing boat : 

Start. Arrived. Suiliinc time. Corrected time. Position. 

Aggie 9.1.22 4.25.40 7.24.18 7.01.17 1 

Nellie <t.:is.L>0 5 M 30 7 56.10 7.11.4:, 2 

Lurline 8.48.35 4.2S.45 7.38.10 7.1937 3 

Flenr de Lis. .9.39.50 5.40 55 8.01.25 7.22.09 4 

Halcyon 8.48 00 4.34.00 7.4ti.00 7.27.27 5 

Casco 9.38.50 5.34.00 7.55.1U 7.55.10 6 

Annie 9.40.40 6.38.30 8.37.50 7.55.17 7 

Ariel 9.41.20 7.00.00 9.1S.40 8 53.45 8 

Lady Mine.. .9.36. 40 5.27.20 7.50.40 

The race was finished in a calm, all the boats drifting across the line. 
No incidents of importance occurred during the run except that the 
Lurline and Nellie were both struck by squalls when off windy gulch, 
ami as each boat was at the time carrying all light canvas the puff gave 
the crews a chance to show their skill in shortening sail. 

The welcome offered to the gentlemen on the Meet by the people of 
Santa Cruz was most hearty and sincere. On the other hand, the Cap- 
tains of the various yachts entertained visitors from the shore in the 
most open handed fashion. The display of fireworks on the Fourth and 
the illuminations on each yacht was worth travelling a hundred miles 
to Bee. The regatta day was changed from the Fourth to the fifth, at the 
urgent request of the Santa Cruz people. The change was a wise one, 
for after the fatigues of the race across Monterey Bay the yachtsmen 
would not have much vim in them for firing rockets and burning blue 
lights, Roman candles, etc. The regatta was a memorable one, and will 
for many a day loom up as a prominent epoch amongst amateur sailors. 
The start was made in a light toutherly breeze, the Annie, Nellie, Lady 
Mine and Lurline getting over the line in close company, less than five 
minutes separating them. The Flenr de Lis and Aggie crossed within two 
minutes of each other and eleven minutes after the first boat. The 
quartette met baffling winds and a heavy swell when two miles off 
shore. Perhaps, for ten minutes, they did not make a hundred yards 
headway. A leading wind reached all four simultaneously, and with 
sheets eased off they raced across the long, rolling seas right merrily. 
Vnr a short time the Annie had the best of it, but her companion, the 
Lady Mine, drew ahead. The pair were to windward; off to leeward 
the Nellie and Lurline were speeding along beautifully, first one and 
then the other showing her nose in front, both soon having their wind- 
ward companions far astern. The Lurline carried more canvas than the 
Nellie, but it was a long time before daylight was visible between them. 
They raced more than ten miles on even terms. In such a sea-way the 
run was made by the Nellie in noble style. But the Agtde and Flenr 
de Lis were almost shut out of the contest ; the inconstant breeze 
would not keep them. The Aggie reeled about helplessly for fifteen 
minutes, the Fleur de Lis nearly twice as long. The stakeboat at 
Monterey was rounded by the Lurline at one minute past one 
o'clock, the Nellie two minutes later, the Lady Mine four minutes 
behind the Nellie, and the Aggie came next at nice minutes 
past one o'clock, but three minutes ahead of the Annie. 
Only working Bails were needed on the beat homeward. The Aggie 
hugged the Monterey shore, getting far up to windward. When she 
started on her course her jibstay parted, and she gave up the race. The 
Lurline, Lady Mine and Nellie pointed direct to Santa Cruz; the Annie 
followed them. Here the Halcyon joined the fleet, aud kept the Lurline 
company. The Casco also came in sight, heading for Monterey, and the 
Fleur de Lis met her competitors on the homeward reach before she had 
the stake-boat in sight. Baffling winda and an ugly cross-sea delayed the 
fleet for a long time, making them pitch and roll unmercifully. When 
the breeze came it was more than the majority wanted. The Annie was 
the first sufferer; her jib was carried away, and under lowered peak she 
made the Santi Cruz shore, about twelve miles to leeward. The Lady 
Mine had her deck washed, aud her jib went, as did also the Halcyon. 
The Fleur de Lis had to cut away her flying jib, and her bobstays parted. 
The Nellie's mishap was slight — the flying-jibstays broke. The Lurline 
went through without a single mishap. The damage was not severe in j 
any instance. The race was a splendid one. The whole fleet had lee; 
rails buiied, and they heeled over in grand style. Nothing half so ex- 



citing wiia ever sewn tm the float oloss hauled with big wav.-s daahlm ov»-r 
the bow* and weather quarter of non. "" , foaming billow* ruabfn 
saoh to leeward. Through fifteen mil' -.■a, with the wind 

whistling through the rigging, was enough t.. males ths bl 1 tingle, and 

tingle Itwoold, -inly tint every man on deck was drenched from oi 

foot. Phe Lurline Wonl And we gladly nay, Hurrah for lb- leading 

boat! Rha waa handled in fine style. The Flenr de Lis came neit Bhe 

i , cam as better, and the Annie claimed 

fourth prise. Ths table will enable yaohtmen to oompare the time, but 
snnol show how each boat was, at one stage or another, buffeted 

by opposing wind.-: 

start. Some Time. Corrected time. Po 

Lurline 10.25 18 5.08 20 6.37-82 6.37.32 1 

Fleur de Lis. .10.26 13 6.03.33 7.36.60 ; l' 

Nellie 10.22 04 6.06.34 TA.i'M) 7.26.00 :J 

Annie 10.17.43 7.02.(1.'. 8.44.22 8.14.34 4 

Lady Mine. ...10.23 00 5 33.35 7.10.36 

Aggie 10.28.42 

The Lad; Mine Bailed with the fleet, but not a*> a competitor for either 
prise or place. The events are now over, and every one looks buck with 
almost unmixed pleasure. The prizes were distributed on Saturday night 
\\ e cannot say anything in praise uf them, but, as the winners sailed fur 
honor, the quality of the trophies dues not matter much. One feature of 
the presentation looked contradictory, the donors of the gift had not the 
uonrage to hand the pieces of plate to the successful competitor*. Why, 
we leave them to answer. We have given so much space to the ocean 
cruise ami deep water regatta of the Pacific Club, that only a line uf space 
is left for us to say that the San Francisco Club made their usual Napa 
cruise during the holidays of the Fourth. Seventeen yachte were in the 
fleet, and the trip was equally enjoyable and satisfactory. 

Cricket.— To-day the Merion and Occident Clubs will play the third 
match fur the Harrison Trophy, at the Olympic Club's grounds, Oakland, 
The Occident Club has won two of the series and appearances indicate 
that they will score another victory this afternoon. The team will be 
about the same as in the preceding match and play will begin punctually 
at two o'clock. On the 18th of June the Australians, in England, scored a 
victory over Cambridge University. The first win from that team made 
by the Colonials, the University beating them in 1S78 and 1882. The 
Australians, in a single innings, scored 378, of which number Murdock 
made 138. Cambridge only put together 204 aud 93. Spofforth and 
Palmer were very destructive in the bowling department. Of twenty 
wickets Palmer claimed 11 and Spofforth 8. On the 15th of June the 
Colonials played and von a close game with Nottingham, scoring 131 aud 
179 for eight wickets, against 170 and 138 made by the crack Midland 
county. The Philadelphia Eleven, now in England, are holding their 
own against the amateur teams which they play from time to time. On 
the 30th of June they were defeated by the Gentlemen of Hampshire at 
Southampton, the scores being Philadelphia 188 and 94, Gentlemen of 
Hampshire 202 and 81, for five wickets. On the 1st of July the Philadel- 
phia defeated the Gentlemen of Gloucester, the scores being Philadel- 
phia 102 and 207, Gentlemen of Gloucester 94 and 107. The Oxford and 
Cambridge match was finished on the 1st of July. Oxford won by seven 
wickets. 

Athletics.— The Merion Club journeyed to Stockton on the Fourth 
to teach the people of the City of Sloughs something about athletics. 
But they would not be taught. The trip was enjoyable, the sport 
good, but the whole thing failed in the main issue. The people who 
should have been there were non est. The 100-yard race {for novices) was 
won by H. Tenny in 12 seconds. F. R. Cook won the half-mile bicycle 
race in 1.41 2 o. For the 109 yards handicap ten started. A. B. Tennant 
won with 4\ yards in 11 seconds, Flynn, the scratch man, being second ; 
a very good race. The running high jump resulted in a tie between R. 
B. Jones and B. A. Benjamin. F. K. Cook took the one-mile handicap 
bicycle race, beating H. 'J'enny with 35 yards in 3.24. J. Flynn made a 
good race of the 440 yards handicap, and won from scratch in 54.3 5, A. 
B. Tennant with 7h yards following. For the mile handicap six started, and 
T. Jennings won from scratch, beating R. Gibson with 80 yards in 4.45, 
the best on record for the Pacific Coast. The weather was dreadfully 
hot. W. G. George has again lowered the record for a mile. On June 
21st, at Birmingham, he beat W. Snook, covering the distance in 
4.18.2 5. 

Angling.— During the Fourth holiday season a great many anglers 
have visited Donner, Independence, and Lake Tahoe, and found good 
fishing in every instance by trolling from a boat. On the Yuba river, 
near Cisco, good fishing has been the rule. In 1873 the Fish Commis- 
sioners stocked the streams with Eastern and McLeod river trout, and 
many are now taken 3A pounds each. From the North Fork American 
river, near Alta, we learn that there is good fishing, and it will be much 
better when a recent landslide is washed away. On the upper Sacra- 
mento good catches are reported, the weight ranging from one-half pound 
to three pounds. This stream can be easily reached by the extension of 
the California and Oregon Pailroad. In Calaveras county {Big Trees) the 
large streams, are very much swollen, but in the small streams good 
catches have been made, the fish running from three to six pounds. The 
Calaveras river will be in fine order later in the present month and during 
August. From Bowlder Creek, in Santa Cruz county, the reports con 
tinue satisfactory. In Lake county, last week, Messrs. A. L. Tubbs & 
Br*, made fine catches of (54 aud 00 trout, filling a No. 4 basket, the 
weight being 20 pounds. In the bay, fishing last week was not good, 
owing to the large amount of fresh water running and the strong, un- 
favorable winds. The steamer Edith made another trip to the Farallones 
last Sunday, but the rough water made nearly every oor seasick. The 
ten who were able to hold a line caught good strings. The Walton Fish- 
ing Club, on Wednesday night, presented to their President, Mr. Clem 
Dixon, a very handsome and appropriate badge, representing a fly rod 
and line, with a trout lying on a plate. Dr. Hughes made the presenta- 
tion, in very suitable terms, and Mr. Dixon replied, with much feeling. 
The Club will lose the services of its genial President for a while, Mr. 
Dixon being about to take a trip to the " ould sod." 

Pigeon Shooting.— The regular meeting of the California Club was 
held at San Bruno last Sunday. The attendance was small, and the first 
match was 12 birds, 21 yards rise. The shooting was good. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AND 



July 12, 1884. 




'The World 

[By 



the Flesh, and the Devh. 

Truthful Penman. 1 



The career of Dr. Strousberg, who has just died a pauper at Berlin, 
was more curious than edifying. He came over to England as a stow- 
away, aud obtained employment as a compositor on a provincial journal. 
He was next heard of as the keeper of a snrt of night-houBe in London. 
Returning to Berlin he was employed as a translator at the British Em- 
bassy. An English contractor had obtained a concession for a Prussian 
railway, and h^d expended considerable sums in preliminary surveys, etc. 
He came to Berlin, and was recommended at the Embassy to employ 
Strousberg in investigating the real value of the concession. Strousberg 
reported that it was valueless, and then obtained it for himself. T'lis was 
the origin of his fortune. He afterwards obtained contracts to make rail- 
roads in Roumania. Certain bonds were to be issued with a Roumanian 
guarantee as soon as the railroads were completed. The bonds were 
printed and placed in a strong box. Strousberg and two trustees each 
had a key of the box, which could only be opened with the three keys. 
The intelligent financialist caused two false keys to be fabricated, opened 
the box, abstracted the bonds and sold them. A number of Prussian 
grandees were compromised iu tnis swindle, and to avoid exposure Prince 
Bismarck forced the Roumanian Government to arrange the matter. 
Strousberg had a huge house in Berlin, and entertained largely. A few 
years ago he came over from London and took a house in Grosvenor- 
place, with a view of shining in Loudon society. In this, however, he 
failed. He then engaged in some Russian speculations, which ruined 
him. — Truth.'^—A Belgian town has just paid a somewhat doubtful 
compliment to Sara Bernhardt. A street in the commune of St. Gilles 
has long been known as the Rue St. Bernard, but a laicising Municipal 
Council has determined to suppress the St. and to name it Rue Sara Bern- 
hardt. The reason alleged by the Council for this choice is that the street 
is long and very narrow, and is accordingly in keeping with the personal- 
ity of the great actress. We hope Madame Bernhardt will feel flattered. 
— Jiid.^— Mr. Hammond, the owner of the horse St. Gatien, who ran 
a dead heat for the Derby Race, began life as a Newmarket stable-boy. 
In process of time he became too heavy to ride, and he then took to tout- 
ing, and as he was blessed with sharp eyes and keen wits, he quickly won 
a considerable sum of money, developed into a professional backer, and 
from that chrysalis state blossomed forth as the owner of a stud of race- 
horses. Mr. Hammond, during the last few years, has won upwards of 
£80,000. He has been very lucky, and as a proof that he is favored by 
fortune he netted a large sum over Dutch Oven's Leger. Mr. Hammond 
was able to back his horse to win a heavy stake without much outlay, as 
St. Gatien was at 33—1 after the Two Thousand. He wins £30,000 by 
St. Gatien, and in addition he had £500 on Harvester. Sir John Wil- 
loughby has not cleared more than £3,000 on the week. He would have 
won a good stake by Queen Adelaide. The Danebury commission for 
Busybody was £2,500.— Truth.— The Queen is sorely trying the affec- 
tion and devoted loyalty of her subjects, as well the lower classes as that 
of those who are more closely connected with her person. Truth says : 
'* The Queen has finally decided that no drawing-rooms are to be held this 
year, and it is doubtful if even a levee will be permitted." Such a de- 
cision works serious injury to those of a certain class of trade in London, 
who are naturally indignant at it. Again, according to Truth, always the 
best authority on such matters, says : " Special orders have been sent by 
the Queen that nobody is to be permitted to enter the Royal Stand, at 
Ascot, this week, and all the blinds are to be kept down ; nor is any one 
to be allowed to view the races from the top of the building." This seri- 
ously affects another class, and tends to throw a gloom over the Ascot 
meeting. Far more honor has been shown to the Scotch gillie, John 
Brown, than to his namesake, the hero and martyr this side the Atlantic. 
——The artistic world of Paris is highly excited over the Messonier 
exhibition. It embraces a large part of the great painter's productions 
during bis fifty years of artistic life. His first small attempt, the 
"Bourgeois Flamands," painted in 1834, brought him 100 francs, while, 
forty years later, A. T. Stewart paid him 800,000 for his "1807," and 
even a higher price has been paid him since that time. His greatest 
work is generally conceded to be his " 1814," conspicuous for the figure 
of the great Emperor after bis crushing defeat at Waterloo. There is 
something in the baffled chief's face indescribable, amounting almost to 
the sublime, and which, in no other of his works, has he so nearly ap- 
proached perfection. One of the mostjinteresting features of the exhibi- 
bition is the sixty-seven sketches and studies made for his "1807." It 
is not likely that any exhibition of artistic work will be seen for many a 
day, where are gathered so many gem3 of the grandest geniuses of the age. 
— The Great "G's." — Three years ago it was said in France that the 
world was governed by the " G's." There was Guillaume, of Germany, 
Gladstone, of England, Gambetta, of France, Gortschakoff, of Russia, 
and Garfield, of the United States. Death has thinned the ranks of the 
" G's," but still, with Guillaume, GreVy, Gladstone and Giers, it has the 
first place in an alphabet of statesmen— as, indeed, it deserves, for does 
not the letter "G" stand for Government? — Pall Mall Budget.^— 
At the recent Vassar exercises it was shown that the Senior class 
waB thoroughly grounded in the " Ethics of Nihilism," " Imagination in 
Mathematics," "Correlation of Synthetic Ideas," and "Biological 
Metempsychosis." The Sub-Freshgirl class on "Architecture of the 
Modern Muffin," " Evolution of the Buckwheat Cake," and " Chemical 
Constituents of Soup," was found deficient.— Life. 

Poison Oak.- A positive preventive and cure is found only in 
Dickey's Famous Creme de Lis. It also removes Tan, Sunburn and 
Freckles. 



BABY. 

Without: A roll of sputless white, 

And lace and work, and various Btrings— 
Some tied too loose, and some too tight : 

A hood, a cape, and other things. 

A cambric veil, a quilt of silk, 

One end that shows two worsted balls, 
An atmosphere of " squills " and milk, 

A sound of lullabys and squalls. 
Within: A tiny human form, 

As soft and rounded as a peach ; 
Whose breath can raise a vocal storm, 

Though yet without the pow'r of speech. 
But yesterday — smooth, flat, and still 

The roll within its basket lay, 
But now endowed with breath and will 

It is a rounded form to-day. 
San Francisco, July 12, 1884. 

A LOATHESOME GANGRENE. 
The polite, pompous and portly policeman, a few years since, 
was seized with a laudable desire to impart good manners and good breed- 
ing to the California hoodlum. This excessive zeal, however, was, like 
most glorious deeds, short-lived. It was distressing, embarrassing, and 
even troublesome ; in fact, that's where the trouble was. All traces of 
this quondam energy have been obliterated and effaced, and the hoodlum 
reigns taiumphant, while ladies, who are compelled to traverse the streets, 
bewail and bemoan that such things should be. It is not of the hoodlum 
proper, the animal whose home and habitat are in the gutter, that they 
complain ; but it is of the more genteel, dudisb, cnlchawed creatchaw, 
who " does " Kearny and Market streets from early morn till chilly eve. 
This listless and languid biped lingers and loiters round the portals of 
saloons and cigar stores. He sponges for drinks, and smokes a two-cent 
cigar, puffing the filthy fumes into female faces, leering and ogling at one 
and all. Should sntne one form or figure prove particularly attractive 
to his aesthetic taste, this gamin and galloot, with brazen- 
faced and arrogant presumption, emerges from his lair and 
forthwith proceeds to hunt down his quarry. He ambles behind, 
beside and before her; he devotes his feeble intellect and energy to 
displaying the cunning and crafty wiles and artifices in which he is an 
adept. Should the jowler's killing glances prove unattractive as he passes 
and repasses his game, he proceeds to emit gutteral sounds; if this fail 
him he will gently jostle, and then, with shameless effrontery, he will 
even dare to speak to the long-since affrighted fawn. He knows her 
name, for it is a part of his nefarious business to know everybody; he 
knows also whether his sport is likely to be interrupted or interfered with. 
If so, the cowardly cur scents his danger from afar and sneaks off, like a 
whipped hound, with his moral tail temporarily bedraggled in metaphori- 
cal muck. Returned to his hunting grounds, the braggadocio is loud- 
mouthed, blustering and boisterous, as he proclaims from his dung-heap 
a tissue of unmitigated lies and fabrications for the edification of the 
open-mouthed and speechless admirers whe ape the antics of this specific 
model of the genus hoodlum, who, though well dressed, and perhaps with 
the appearance of a gentleman, swarms on our streets and debases and 
disgraces our city. This is the monstrum, horrendum, informe that our 
blue-coated boycotters should order to move on; this is the dastardly de- 
baucher that should be persecuted and prosecuted frequently and fear- 
lessly until we have crushed out of all shape and existence a loathesome 
gangrene. 

Thore were 2,805 births and 1,450 deaths registered in London in one 
week of June. Allowing for increase of population, the births exceeded 
by 229 and the deaths by 25 the average numbers in the corresponding 
weeks of the last ten years. The annual death-rate from all (.auses, 
which had been 18.5, 19.2 and 18.9 per 1.000 in the three preceding 
weeks, was 18.8. The deaths included 27 from small-pox, 73 from 
measles, 33 from scarlet-fever, 24 from diphtheria, (il from whooping- 
cough, 17 from enteric fever and 21 from dysentery. 



Many of the theatres have changed their bills, several of them have 
shut up, and out of the forty theatres now open in London, perhaps not 
more than twelve are taking their expenses, and certainly half that num- 
ber are not making a profit. Lawrence. Barrett's receipts at the Lyceum 
ran down as low as £30 a night, which hardly paid the rent of the estab- 
lishment. 

INSURANCE. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIREnNSURANCEncOMPANY, - 

OP HAMBURG. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 I Assets Jan. 1.1884.91,088,015.63 

Surplus 237,383.00 | Invested in the U. S. 491,334.28 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

333 California street, San Francisco Cal., 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liahle jointly and severally for all losses that may he sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HARRY VV. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California St . , S. F. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital J7.500.000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., General Agents, 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



July IS, 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTISKK 



IS NO DEATH 
Thrrv i» ii" (fofttfa | The 'tin* k'<> doWfl 

To rita npon torn* fairer ihore, 
An. I bright in lu-.ivti)\ jeweled mown 

T1k*v Bbioe for Bvti mor*. 
There i- ii" death ! The duel m tread 

Bhall change beneath tli»* Bummer showers 
To golden grain, or mellow fruit, 

i >r rainbow tinted tl-'wers. 
The granite rooka disorganise 

To feed the hungry mom they hoar; 
The fairest learn drink daUy life 

From nut the riewlera ;»ir. 
There is do death ! The leares may fall, 

Tiic flowen may fade .mil puu away ; 
They only wait through wintry hours 

The coming of the May. 

There is im death ! An angel form 

Walks oer the earth with silent tread ; 

He bears our best loved things away. 
And then we call them "dead." 

He leaves our hearts all desolate ; 

He plucks our fairest, sweetest flowers; 

Transplanted into bMes, they now 

Adorn immortal bowers. 
The bird like voice, whose joyous tones 

Made glad the scene of sin and strife, 
3inga now in everlasting song 

Amid the trees of life. 
And when he sees a smile too bright, 

Or heart too pure for taint and vice, 
He bears it to that world -if light, 

To dwell in paradise. 
Born into that undying life. 

They leave us but to came a^ain ; 
With joy we welcome them, the same 

Except in sin and pain. 
And ever near us, though unseen, 

The dear immortal spirits tread, 
Fur all the boundless universe 

Is life: there are no dead. —Anonymous. 



FOB THE CONSIDERATION OF THE MILLIONAIRES. 

A generous gift is that of Lemuel J, Curtis, the Yankee millionaire, 
and nne of the founders of the Meridan Brittania Company, and Presi- 
dent of the Miller Bros. Cutlery Company. He haB built and donated 
to the town of Meridan, Conn., a building to be called the Curtis Home, 
to be used for the care of orphans and aged women, and endowed it with 
the income of §2ri0,000 for its maintenance. Would that some of our 
bonanza kings had the disposition to emulate the work of Mr. Curtis, 
and cause to be established here a home for broken down and aged men. 
There is, probably, no city in the world where the proportion of these 
is so great according to the population as here, and its marked feature 
is that it consists principally of those who were once among the most suc- 
cessful and prosperous men in the community. They mostly came here 
in early days, strong, vigorous, hopeful and ambitious, and contributed 
largely to build up the city and state ; but various causes have led to 
their defeat in the battle of life, and many now find themselves helpless 
to struggle with the new generation which has taken their place, and in 
many cases old age has come upon them and rendered them unable to 
work, even if they could obtain it. To such, and there are many of them, 
-without kith or kiL iu the land, for which they left home and friends, 
there is nothing left but the degrading necessity of appealing to friends, 
of whom even the most generous soon grow weary, or else the Alms- 
house, over the door of which might justly be inscribed Dante's well- 
known inscription over the gates of hell : '* Sarciate ogri speranza, voi 
ck'entrate. 

Who, among our millionaires, will be the first to make his name en- 
duriug by founding an institution for the class we refer to? There are 
many amongst them who either have some trifling source of income, but 
insufficient to provide them with the necessities of life, while others have 
friends who would contribute something towards their support. Both of 
these classes, in such an institution, would find a home and place of 
refuse, where, contributing their little means, they would not feel or be 
regarded as paupers. Such an institution, in charge of and under the 
regulation of some of the good Sisters devoted to such work, would be a 
great boon to the community at large and of inestimable good to the 
class that we have referred to. Think it over, ye gods of wealth, and if 
it please ye, act upon our suggestion. 



SOMETHING NICE. 



Consumers of whisky, who desire to get a pure and reliable article, 
should bear two thinge in mind. The first is to buy nothing but brands 
that have a well established reputation, and the second is to buy from 
traders who can be relied upon to furnish goods which are exactly what 
they are represented to be. In this connection we desire to direct atten- 
tion to the three brands of fine old Bourbon Whisky, of which Messrs.. E. 
Martin & Co., No. 408 Front street, are the proprietors. They are known 
as the " Argonaut," the " J. F. Cutter," and " Miller's Extra," and in 
the way of whisky nothing more delicious could be produced. They are 
made from the very best materials, in the most careful manner, and are 
not put upon the market until their sparkling, vigorous spirit has been 
properly refined and mellowed with age and a delicious flavor attained. 
Messrs. Martin & Co. have been in business on this coast for about 
twenty-six years, and during that long term they have always maintained 
the reputation of being honorable, straightforward traders, and, conse- 
quently, they and their goods can be thoroughly relied upon. 



John Mi dole ton - Coal— 14 Post st., and NE. cor. Geary and Maaon. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
Wo*. 332 nuii 32 4 Ualirorula street, Mm Prarunlnw, rui. 

Fire Insurance. 



.ol New Y»rk 
ol Pittsburgh 
ol Mti 

.. ol Si 

0l N, 
ol Batllraon 

. ..: PHI 



IRVING ( N«-« Fork 

MECHANICS' ol v 

METROPOLITAN PLATEGLASSol NY. 
NEW ORLEANS ins, ISSO) I 

i'i:\ss\ i.\ \m \ 

PEOPLE'S ..f Pittsburgh 

BT. I'AI I oj 

TBUTOMA ol Now Orleans 



AUKKTl/n'UAL 

i VNMA 

BOATMAN'S 

CITIZENS' 

PARRAGUT 

FIREMAN'S 

GERMAN 

G1RARU .,( PhUftdelpr! 

LONDON AND NORTHWESTERN ol Manchester. 
Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London 

LA F0NC1EEB MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of Paris 

Capital Represented $27,000 000 

All Louse* Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON. 

320 im<i 322 California street. Nan FrauclMcn. «'ai 

HUTCHINSON & MANN Managers) W. L. CHALMERS.. Special and adjust I 



(Organized 1SG3.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 

Assets 81.400,000 | Losses pni.l over.. $5,000. 000 

g^TThe Largest Asset* and Largest [uoome of all the Companies hailing from 

west of New York State. Does a larger business on the Pacific Coast tha | 

other L'nnipaiiy, Loral. Kastoni or Foreign. 

n. J 3TAPLB8 President! WM. J. DUTTOH Boci 

ALl'IIKUS BULL.. Vice-President I E. W. CAHPENTEB ASM. Secretary 



BOME OFFICE, 
COR. CALIFORNIA. AND SANSOME STS. 

SAN EKANC1SC0. 
Agents in all prominent localities: Sept. 22. 



SOUTHWEST 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864, 
Principal Office 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital Paid Up in U. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 75 



I Premiums, aincBorgauizat'n. $4,611,827,67 
| Crosses, since organization.. 81,972,098 10 



Assets January 1, 1834 $769,475 IS I 

Surplus fur policy holders 8752,096,78 

Net Surplus (over everything/ $259,086 98 j 

OFFICERS : 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I oil AS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | EL H. MAG1LL Genera] Agent 

Dirkctohb ok Tin-: Homk Muthal In.suiiancb Co. — L h. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. N. Shepardj John Currcy, J. P. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse, Chauucey 
Taylor, H. Huff, J. S. Carter. II. P. Coon. April 12. " 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8750,000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I GUSTAVB TOUCHAED President 

C. P. FAKNF1ELD General Agent | N. O. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 

SOUTH BRITISH ANO NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, 820 ,000,000- 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, $10,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE~lNSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, $5,000,000- 
W. J. CALLINOHAM * CO., General Ageuts, 

Aug. 12 • 213-215 Sansoine Street 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London — Established 1836. 
Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building*. 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

London, England, Estab'd 1782. —Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto. Canada, Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851 —Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BUTLER A HALDAN. 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital as, 000,000. —A;cen ts: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 
y 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. IS. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1884. 



THE TARIFF ISSUE. 

The Democrats have bedeviled and humbugged the tariff issue in a 
way that may well cause the country to doubt the present capacity of 
that party to well and wisely manage the affairs of the nation. That is 
about the last impression they ought to have created at this time, but 
then their genius for blundering is proverbial. They were met with the 
fact that the present tariff was yielding more revenue than sufficed to 
carry on an economically administered government. Of course it was 
entirely proper to accommodate things to the altered condition of the 
national finances. Nobody wants to see more money collected from the 
people than the government requires. Something had to be done by the 
Democrats, because they were in control of the House of Representa- 
tives, which is more particularly charged with money-raising and money- 
spending. How they attempted but failed to do that "something" is a 
sorry story to tell. They, or rather a majority of them, preached a 
doctrine distasteful to the country as a whole, and then proceeded in an 
exceedingly inconsistent manner to do no more to an avowedly protective 
tariff than to reduce 5 it horizontally. They were some twenty per cent, 
less protectionists than their predecessors, but they were protectionists 
all the same. The speeches of Morrison, Carlisle, Hurd and others de- 
clared that " protection was robbery," but the protection was continued 
nevertheless. There was to be a little less of it, that was all. Even 
upon that innocuous proposition the Democratic party was divided and 
finally defeated itself. From Congress it retreated to Chicago and 
there played tricks before high heaven that may well make men and 
angels weep. After au all-night session they reached a conclusion with 
which they appealed to the country for support that is absolute non- 
sense. If any man can read the tariff plank formulated by the Demo- 
cratic Convention and tell what it means we will at once back him 
against all-comers as the best revealer of riddles and the best answerer 
of conundrums alive. The Republicans have declared for a tariff for all 
it is worth, with all the protection that it can be made to afford. One- 
half the Democrats want precisely the same thing, but the other half 
want a tariff that shall be all things to all men ; that shall be big with 
nothingness and pregnant with emptiness. And all this at a time when 
industries created under the existing tariff control the politics of several 
States and want nothing so much as to be let alone. Bah ! We are sick 
of such politics. No wonder that the young men of the country, al- 
though born of Democratic parentage, hesitate to attach themselves to a 
party that cannot avoid blundering even by accident. 

HAFPV ACCIDENTS. 
It Is said that some countries, and this one in particular, are gov- 
erned by " happy accidents." George Washington was, in a certain 
sense, one of these, and Abraham Lincoln was, in a more emphatic 
meaniug, another. The East knew little of him. He was a creation 
and a child of the West. In accepting him the nation took, as it were, 
a leap in the dark. But it proved, most happily and unexpectedly, a 
wise, thoughtful and conservative leap. For the times that were then 
upon us, Abe Lincoln was " God's own man." He was made for the oc- 
casion. He was "a happy accident," whose worth the nation did not at 
first realize, and never fully comprehended. But he came to be more or 
less appreciated, and ever since both parties have been in search of just 
such another " accident," but they have reckoned without their host. 
He has simply not appeared. Circumstances make men, and they made 
him. But the circumstances are now different, and a very different man 
is required. We have no exciting slavery question looming up, and no 
war impending. We are in search of milder ways and better adminis- 
trative results. The era is one of progress and industry. The Republic 
is at peace. We want to be let alone, and be permitted to work out our 
own destiny in quietness. We desire nothing so much as amity with 
our neighbors and peace with all the world. For this reason the great 
commercial cities of our Republic do not take kindly to such a fillibuster 
as Blaine, who is the greatest exploder of political pyrotechnics our na- 
tion can boast of. He would embroil us in trouble with all the world. 
He would involve us in war iu order to make money out of the nitre and 
guano beds of Chili and Peru. He has been tried and found wanting. 
We want none of him. Yet, on the other hand, the Democrats are in 
search of "a happy accident," and are just a little timid whether they 
will get him or not. They want Cleveland, without being just too sure 
<>f him. They know absolutely nothing about him. They are in search 
of " a happy accident," but at this present time of writing they seem ex- 
ceedingly unlikely to find him. We believe in foresight and reason, and 
not in " accidents." Before we go to press we shall have something fur- 
ther to say on this subject. 

THE TWO-THIRDS RULE. 
The two-thirds rule has hitherto worked well enough in the Demo- 
cratic party, but we confess to grave doubts as to whether its operation 
hereafter will prove advantageous. In the closer political struggles that 
are manifestly before us, it would seem impossible to long attain to that 
comparative unanimity that is involved in a two-thirds majority. Even 
now it is very possible to conceive of a dead-luck being brought about by 
it. If, for instance, the free traders were to insist upon nominating a 
candidate of their way of thinking, and the protectionists were equally 
bent on having their own way, what would happen? Neither has a two- 
thirds majority, and no nomination at all would be possible in the case 
we are supposing. That there will be a clear-cut, sharp and very decisive 
division in the Democratic party on that question is even now almost an 
accomplished fact. We read that the Committee on Platform is exactly 
and equally divided on the tariff plank. In that condition of thing* it is 
manifest that if delegates are true to the principles they profess to cher- 
ish, no Presidential candidate can obtain the requisite two-thirds of the 
whole. The rule, if much longer insisted upon, must result in either un- 
wise and meaningless compromises or the disruption of the party. The 
majority ought to prevail in conventions, no less than in the country at 
large. It is very certain if the two-thirds rule had prevailed in the Re- 
publican party it would, ere this, have proved disastrous. Under it Lin- 
coln never could bave been nominated, neither could Hayes or Garfield, 
and hardly anybody else who has risen to eminence in that party. We 
are persuaded that the two-thirds rule will not much longer prove to be 
practicable, and that it cannot be too soon abrogated, lest it le id to com- 
plications and trouble. 



BLAINE. 

In nothing is it more apparent that the Pacific coast is a far-off prov- 
ince of this great Republic, and that it really and in fact does not beat 
responsive to the impulse and throb of the nation, than in the fact that 
whilst there is a perfect hurrah here for Blaine, his nomination has been 
received with coolness and disdain by the better elements of his party in 
the East, and especially in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut and 
New Jersey. Whilst here he is received as a sort of demigod, there he is 
talked of as the " tattooed candidate," which, being interpreted, means 
that he is spotted all over with duplicity and acts of corruption. There 
is not, it would appear, a sound spot in all his political body. How is it 
possible to go into an aggressive and successful campaign with such a can- 
didate ? We believe it can be done on the Pacific slope, because here, all 
we may say to the contrary notwithstanding, we are a narrow and prov- 
incial people, bound to no principles that have a lasting basis, and to no 
principles that are not founded in wide experience. Dislike the judgment 
as we may, it is, notwithstanding, true that we are a small, beggarly and 
contemptible lot compared with the great aspirations and inspirations of 
the nation. We are in the whirlpool, but hardly of it. We are Califor- 
nians, but only in a limited sense are we Americans. There are bigger 
and better things east, west and south of us. There are stalwarts, where 
we are but pigmies. There are great citizens, where we are but babes 
and sucklings. We content ourselves with the politics of four years ago, 
and learn few lessons from one national convention. But the world else- 
where moves on. And it is because it does that the record of Blaine is 
being overhauled, that the '* Independents " are arrayed against him, and 
that, with a cleanly candidate opposed to him, he cannot win the votes of 
the better element of his own party. The best men and the best news- 
papers of his party are a solid phalanx against him, and he could easily be 
beaten, as we believe he|ougbt to be, but then the Democrats will so blun- 
der as to cause him to win. Despite his tattooed body, he is likely to be 
our next President. 

FINDING IT OUT. 

The dailies are just finding out the facts, long since made apparent 
through the columns of the News Letter, that the majority of the pres- 
ent Board of Education constituted, in their earlier adojinistration, a cor- 
rupt and abominable set. They are the one black spot in an otherwise 
cleanly and economical city administration. We long ago called con- 
spicuous attention to their wrong doing, forced a grand jury to take cog- 
nizance of their corrupt ways, and very generally proved a series of grave 
allegations. At that time we had no assistance from the daily press. 
But at that time little or no party capital was to be made out of an ex- 
posure. But now that an election is near at hand the Chronicle forces 
the fighting and compels certain of its contemporaries to follow in its 
wake. Its exposures are not new and they refer to a bygone date. The 
" solid eight " has, principally through the efforts of this paper, been 
broken up, and at this moment there is little to complain of in the man- 
agement of the educational department of the city government. We 
abominate that kind of journalism that winks at known evils and even 
encourages them, in order that they may be resurrected and made party 
capital of upon the eve of an election. The Chronicle has long had in its 
possession the facts that it is now publishing, but it carefully pigeon- 
holed them for use at the right time. It tbinks that right time has now 
arrived. It cares less for reform, when reform is needed, than it does 
for party thunder at the " right time." 

A SURPLUS. 
It is said that there is nothing new under the sun, but it has just been 
demonstrated in San Francisco that there is. It not only happens that 
that new thing is not only new, but that it is exceedingly agreeable. It 
is no less than a surplus of S130,000 in the City Treasury at the end of 
the fiscal year. All current expenses have been paid or provided for, and 
yet the treasury is not empty. No such thing has occurred before within 
the memory of the oldest inhabitant. The much vaunted " people's 
party " never gave us any such happy experience. The present City Gov- 
ernment, though not without faults, has done itself credit, and has fairly 
won a renewal of confidence from the people. It came into power amidst 
many forebodings of evil. It inherited many unfortunate legacies from 
its Republican predecessor. There was a shortage in the Treasury and 
unusual debts had been incurred. It was said that the one-dollar pledge 
Dever would or could be carried out. But it has been, both in letter and 
in spirit, and the City Government has not suffered in efficiency in any 
department. Moreover there is a large surplus. We say that, all things 
considered, this is the most creditable result that has ever been reached 
by an administration in this city, and it ought to be held in grateful re- 
membrance by the tax-payers without distinction of party. The way to 
continue and perpetuate economical administration is to indorse and ap- 
prove it when found. That is the only way to reward and encourage 
faithful servants in well-doing. 



HOW TO SPEND IT. 

Santa Claus has been visiting our City Treasury, and has deposited 
there presents for old and young, in the shape of numerous twenty-dollar 
pieces. His visit is rather unseasonable, but none the less agreeable. 
It is exceedingly befitting that the young should most largely participate 
in his good things. Of the surplus in the City Treasury, one-half of it is 
to go in providing new school buildings and in paying the salaries of 
teachers for the month of June. Two new schools are to be built just 
where they were most needed. The stigma and disgrace is to be removed 
of paying the teachers only oue-half their hardly earned salaries for the 
last month of the fiscal year, and now they are wisely and properly to be 
paid in full. A further sum is to be spent in improving the Park, and 
that is good, for the Park is rapidly becoming popular, ami the cable roads 
have made it the resort and trysting place of the young folks. It cannot 
have too much attention bestowed upon it, in order that its attractiveness 
may be increased and its healthful and pleasurable tendencies extended. 
We shall be glad to know that our city fathers see their way cle-ir to pro- 
vide a permanent water supply to the Park. Nothing is need <1 but water 
to maintain the Park in all its elegance throughout the entire Summer 
months. 

Neither the nibbler nor the glutton knoweth the value of the feast. 



July 18, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



TOWN CRIER. 



■ lUar th» Ortort" " Wh*1 (b« d«ril art tboo T 
' Ouf that will play th« iln*il. a»r with voa.' 
' lif'd a stinc in bin tail as long aa a ilail. 
Which made him crow holder and bolder." 



with tbe present Issuo th. News Lima commences its thirty fifth 
volume, Wbml took bmrk over the titlliations and troubles Incident to 

birty and four volumes I scratch myhairii 
refleetii . " What next?* 1 Daring my long and intimate asso 

dailon tritfa tli i-i paper I have covered mnalf with soars. In a Beroe, 
though briel battle with an Invading pool I lost the dapper of my right 
it Tint was in 1888, In the early spring of 1859 I lost a las to a fcer- 
rifio combat with two bad men who came to to clean "tit the office. The 
engagement vie brief end to the point I tost (as I said above] a leg ; 
the two bad men lost their Lives. On a balmy summer day in I860 I hail 
the misfortune to have my left eye punched out by a sensitive mother-in- 
law, to whom I had playfully alluded in a six line joke. As she was a 
woman, and armed with an umbrella, 1 could do little to protect myself, 
and a i the left optic had tu go. There is not a Bquare inch of flesh on 
my face that la not pox-marked with nan. My body is mapped all over 
with ballet wounds snd horse-whippings. I am a scarred and seedy vet- 
eran; bot don't you forget, gentle reader, that I have my share of the 
trophies r.f war. In my personal museum hang the ears of two hundred 
and seventy five poets; in a glacs case repose, in nasal splendor, the aosea 
of one honored and twenty politicians who came in to net satisfaction. 
Yonder against the wall dangles the war-club and the right leg of the 
man who " wanted to see the editor who wrote that item." Here, in thiB 
bottle of alcohol, are the few brains of a dude recently killed. I have 
hair enough 00 hand to start a mattress factory. I have a rare collection 
of old hats, coat-tails, eye-glasses, canes, pistols, etc. 0, yes, dear read- 
er, though I may be somewhat broken up in a physical wa\, I still have 
enough accumulated rubbish to enable me at any time to start in the junk 
business. The past is prolific with suggestive memories of a busy life. 
The future opens out before me like a scroll. With the permission of ray 
kind employers I shall in the future eudeavor to maintain that unswerv- 
nereuoe to the right which has so distinguished and scarred me in 
the past. I will joke when it seemeth necessary to my risibility so to do ; 
I will puncture the hides of villains on every occasion ; I will fight at 
the drop of any man's chapeau. I scarcely expect to see the completion 
of thirty-four more volumes of the News LETTER, but while I survive I 
will endeavor to make it warra for those who hate me, and pleasant for 
the friends who have been my readers all these long years. Foreman, 
bring forth that figure 5— the News Letter turn3 over a new leaf to-day. 

The various political parties of the nation have given their plat- 
forms to the couutry for approval or condemnation. I feel that it is en- 
cumbent upon me, as a prominent factor in politics, to formulate a 
platform and fling it boldly into the arms of the public, and I herewith 
do so : 

WHEREAS, The Government of the United States is tbe noblest upon 
the face of the earth, or upon the breast, or upon the back, or upon any 
other part of the earth ; and, 

WHEREAS, I was born under the shadow of the American flag, and be- 
ing once born, was too mulish to die, and am hence alive to-day ; and, 

WHEREAS, The eyes of all my creditors, landladies, tailors, tobacco- 
nists, etc., etr., are upon me, as well as the eyes of the Sheriff, therefore, 

Resolved, That I, The Town Crier, in Convention assembled, without 
fear or favor, and with malice aforethought, do hereby make, concoct, 
indite and publish my platform of political principles, as follows, to-wit. 
namely : 

Resolved, That I recognize in the Hon. T. Crier, of San Francisco, a 
man of ability, gall and impudence, and therefore a bang-up politician ; a 
man of unsavory record, of loose political principles, of clap-trap states- 
manship, and therefore a first-class Presidential candidate. 

Resolved, That I favor the nomination of Hon. T. Crier for President 
of the United States, subject to the ratification of himself and the Mutual 
Pie biters* Association. 

Resolved, That I am in favor of such an administration of public 
affairs as shall, in the speediest and most effectual manner, 611 my pockets 
with coin and my head with self esteem. 

Resolved, That I favor a tariff for revenue only, four-fifths of said 
revenue to be mine by right of discovery ; the balance to be turned into 
a campaign fund to be used toward my re-election four years hence. 

Resolved, That 1 am in favor of a vigorous foreign policy ; a policy 
that shall be fed raw meat three times a day ; a policy that shall be kept 
in an iron cage to prevent it's chewing people up ; a policy that shall 
make the nations of the earth green with envy ; a policy that P. T. 
Barnum will offer me §100,000 for ; a vigorous policy, old enough to vote 
and drink liquor like an old person. 

Resolved, That I favor the payment of the national debt, and hereby 
donate thirty cents for that purpose. 

Resolved, That I view with horror afld dismay the growth of the 
dude element throughout our nation, and hereby pledge myself to favor 
every measure that shall have for its aim the giving of the dude 
his due. 

Resolved, That I recognize in President Arthur a tolerably good man, 
but I want no more of bim, at least not just chet. 

Resolved, That the Republican party is rotten to the core ; the Demo- 
cratic party filled with corruption ; and all other parties, except the 
Town Crier Darty, dishonest and untrustworthy. Finally, 

Resolved, That I am immense ; that I think I am immense ; and that 
I don't care who knows I am immense. 

I pray for mercy upon Merced. On last Sunday morning a " Holi- 
ness Band," under the leadership of Rev. Gill and Brother Leach, was 
attacked by a gang of unholy Philistines and badly beaten with ancient 
aud defunct hen-fruit. I am informed, by the Associated Press, that 
Parson Gill " was a most hideous and disgusting Bight to behold." While 
holding my nose, I beg to offer Bro. Gill my sympathies ; and also to 
suggest to him that, from a cursory view, I incline to the opinion that 
the " Holiness Band " better sound a retreat from Merced. Under ordi- 
nary circumstances, it is good doctrine to "hold the fort," but not when 
the enemy are armed with ovarious rottenness. 



Tho policy of the afor i 0la/fto preserve a strict neutrality upon 

all inbjeots is, at tin pparent ai to provoke hilarity. 

tnpla oi Mr. Pickering's opintonleas editorials I submit tbe fol 

lowing from the issue of July tftb : "No serious thought is entertained 

that the cholera will visit Sun Kraiirwo, vvhi.-h will Orobal lj DS the first 

point ii would touch in tbe even! ol Its arrival oo this coast. While we 
feel pretty well assured .if our safety, there is no osrtalo 

immunity, and for this reason it I none 1 arly to make such pn 

dona as will fight off the epidemic, or, if it should com.-, give it a cold 
reception." I will confess that heretofore I have quaked in my boots for 
fear San Braneiaoo might be eflUoted with tbe scourge of cholera, hot 
stnoe reading the above my mind is at ease. I now firmly believe that 
the cholera will not visit us. i am oonvinoed when it does come we will 

be prepared for it. I am certain it will not arrive. I feel that when the 

epidemic breaks out in oar midst It will receive the odd shoulder. For 

my peaceful state of mind in this regard Mr. Pickering has my thank*. 

It Is with a body covered with court plaster from the crown of my 
head to the sole of my foot, thai I nawl \>:uk into my sanctum on this 
the 7th day of July, 18KJ. With due solemnity I last week an- 
oounced my intention of celebrating tho glorious Fourth in a manner 
becoming the patriotism of the occasion. I this week announce with 
equal solemnity that, so far as I am concerned, tho occasion has been 
celebrated with every attention to detail which patriotism or dim 
phnlism could suggest. It is my purpose, gentle reader, to rauke this 
report short ; furl am compelled to write it while standing, as I fear 
that the chair upon which I usually sit has become too old and decrepid 
to bear me. I am now convalescent, and my physicians inform me that 
they have hopes of my recovery. For this information, as well as for 
tbe blessed intelligence that the Fourth of July comes but once a year, 1 
am thankful. If the business manager will now kindly hand me my 
crutch I will endeavor to take a walk. 

I owe the Prohibition Party an apology. In common with a large 
number of short-sighted people, I have heretofore looked upon the Pro 
hibitionists as fanatics and fools. I have changed my mind. In a recent 
number of the Home Protector, Prohibition organ of Philadelphia, I find 
printed six reasons for choosing Dr. R. H. McDonald for Presidential 
candidate, the longest of which is the fourth. I quote a portion of it : 
" He is the only reformer able and willing to shoulder the financial '<"/•- 
dens an active campaign imposes." Behold, what evidence of wisdom is 
here! Solomon, with all his larnin', never soliloquized so soberly. In 
deep humility I offer the Prohibition party my head for a football. I 
perceive they are no fools; on the contrary, they are men of sense, yea, 
even of dollars and cents. 

Not one of the glorious Fourth processionists looked happy. They all 
bore a dismal, dreary wish-l-could-get-out-of-it appearance, especially the. 
women and children who represented the various states, and were jolted 
on springless wagons over our cursed cobble stones. The milingtary 
would disgrace a school cadet corps by the irregularity of their marching 
and maneuvering. The portly police took the cake in this respect, but 
subsequently enjoyed their otium cum dig by disregarding the orders of 
their chief, and allowing fire-crackers to be discharged on all the streets ; 
but they arrested two Chinamen. One of my neighbors, not to be out- 
done by the small boys, blazed away from his open window with a double 
barreled shotgun. It was a glorious fourth in town, and gloriously cele- 
brated. 

The Lick House window is a curious oootanical studio. As the 
loungers sit, with their legs up, admiring the fair and frail female passers, 
one can see every variety of boot and shoe, from thf elegant, neatly-fitting 
needle pointer to tbe broad and flat fifteen-acre tan yard. The latter are 
the more numerous, and someiimes are beautified by the addition of a 
landscape of a section of hairy shin-bone if the legs are sufficiently ele- 
vated. Keep them up, gentlemen, they are pretty as a picture. 

The citizen-making machines are now in full blast, and a man of 
any nationality can, in a few minutes, be transformed into a good Ameri- 
can citizen, and be enabled to cast a vote for the President. Men who 
have only been a day or so in the country can be manufactured into 
full-blown citizens in no time, by a process that is kept a strict secret by 
the bureaus of both parties. All they want is votes. 

The body of an unknown man was found floating in the bay, last 
Monday morning. The pockets were filled with rocks, intended, prob- 
ably, as sinkers. From this fact it is supposed that the corpse is that of 
a Fourth of July poet. No use talking, brethren, the buoyancy of patri- 
otic poets will rise, in spite of rocks anil waves. 

The American Colony in Berlin celebrated the 4th of July, and the 
cable dispatch says that " toasts offered to President Arthur and Emperor 
William were drank with enthusiasm." Of course they were. Had they 
been offered in the name of a naked Zulu they would have been Bwallowed 
with equal enthusiasm. An American, whether at home or abroad, never 
refuses to take a drink. 

Some of the members of the Shoemakers' Union of San Francisco 
have signified their intention of quitting work at the bench and going in- 
to the harvest field, where wages are §3 and £4 per day, including board. 
I gather from this intelligence that the members of the Union only en- 
gages in shoe-making as a " laBt " resort. 

'* Taking shape" was the heading of an editorial upon the proceed- 
ings of the Democratic National Convention, published in a San Fran- 
cisco daily on Wednesday. For a moment I was filled with emotion. I 
imagined that the Convention probably meant to nominate Hancock. 

The first Mexican bull-fight on American soil took place last Sat- 
urday at Dodge City, Kansas. Fittingly enough, there were about 500 
Cowboys among the audience. 

Two hundred and forty-five unlicensed and unmitigated curs 
were cut off in the youth of their yelps, in this city, last month. At 
this rate dog-barks will soon become a rarity, in which only the rich can 
hope to indulge. 

Australians will probably swarm to England in large numbers, via 
San Francisco, in order to escape tbe cholera. On arriving in our city of 
smells they will think that they have come to the right place to catch the 
disease. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A^D 



July 12, 1884. 



C. P. R. R. 

Time Schedule-Tuesday, July 1st, 1884, 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
San Francisco as follows : 



LEAVK | 
_<*«; I 

8:00 A.M. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
t(S:00 A.M. 
•9:30 a.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*4:00 p,M. 

S:00 a.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

3:30 P.M. 

7.00 p.m 

7:30 A.M. 
•3:30 P.M.!. 

7:30 am.'. 

4:00 p.m.!. 

3:30 P. H 

7:30 am 
"5:00 p.m 
•9:30 a.m 

3 30 p.m 

8:00 a.m. 

8:30 p.m. 

7:00 p.m 

7:3(1 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 

3:00 P.M. 
♦5:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m 

7:U0 p.m 

8:00 A.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

7:30 a.m. 

8:00 a.m 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 P.M. 
*4:00 P.M. 

7:30 A.M. 
tl0:00 A.M 

3:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 
*9;30 A.M. 

3:00 P.M. 

4:00 P.M. 

3:00 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

4:00 p M. 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 

(from) 



, .Byron and Martinez . 

. .Calistogaand Napa.. 
,. Colfax '.*. 



J Deming, El Paso ^Express. 

(and East ) Emigrant 

J Gait and \ via Livermore. . . . 

I Stockton ) via Martinez 

..lone 

. .Knight's Landing 

..Los Angeles and South 

. Livermore and Pleasanton. . 

t Merced, Madera, | 

| Fresno and Tulare ( 

, . Haryaville and Chico 

J Mojave, Needles I Express . . 

land East f Emigrant. 

..Nilesand Hay wards 



I Ogden and I Express 

\ East f Emigrant , 

j Red Bluff I via Mar sville 
| and Tehama l via Woodland 

..Redding 

..Sacramento via Livermore. 

" via Benicia.... . 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia... . 
..Sacramento River Steamers. 
..San Jose 



..Vallejo., 



..Virginia City.. 
..Woodland 



[ 6:40 p.m. 

I 7:40 a.m. 

10:10 a.m. 

H0:40 p.m. 

12:10 p.m. 

9.10 a.m. 

♦10:10 a.m: 

H:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

6:10 a.m. 

5:40 p M. 

♦12:10 P.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

10.10 A.M. 

9:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

*8:40 A.M. 

'12:10 p.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

9:10 am. 

0:10 A.M. 

5:40 p.M. 

3:40 p.m. 

&:40 a.m. 

*8:40 a.m 

7:40 A.m. 

11:40 a. il 

5:40 P.M. 

0:40 p.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

5:40 p.m. 

0:40 P.M. 

7:40 A.M. 

10:10 A.M. 

•6:00 A.M. 

'3:4U P.M. 

13:40 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 

0:40 P.M 

'12:10 P.M. 

9:10 am. 

10:10 A.M. 

7:40 A.M. 

0:40 P.M. 

10:10 A.M. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 7:00 a. m. can meet 
Pacific Express from Ogden at Oakland Pier; and that 
leaving at 8:30 a. M. can meet Pacific Express from The 
Needles and El Paso at Oakland Pier. 
*"undays excepted. (Sundays only. 

5Duily frnm Martinez. Sundays only from Byron. 



LOCAL FERRY THAINa. 



Dally. 



From "SAN FBASXISCO 

To EAST OAKLAND— •6:00, "6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 

8:30,9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00,12:80. 

1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:00, 6:30, 

6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:011, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 
To FRUIT VALE— '6:00, '6:30, *7:00, »7:30.#8:00, *S:30, 

'3:30, ^4:00, *4:30, *5:00, *5:30, *0:00, *6:30. 9:00. 
To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda) -'9:30, 6:30, 111:00, 

■12:0ii. 
To ALAMEDA— •6:00, *6:30, 7:00, "7:30, 8:00, '8:30, 9:00. 

9:30,10:00, 110:30, 11:00, 1 11:30, 12:00, 112:30, 1:0*1, 

J 1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 

7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 
To BERKELEY - <H5:00, *6:30, 7:00. *7:30, 8:00, *8;30, 

9:00, t'J:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00. 

2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 

9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 
To WEST REKKELEY-*6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, (S:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00. (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, *4:30, 

6:00, *5:30, 6:00, ■■•'6:30, 7:00. 



to 



* SAN FRAN CISCO." Dally. 



From FRUIT VALE-*6:23, *6:53, *7:23, *7:53, *S:23, 
•8:58, ^>:23, "10:21, -H:23, *4:53, '5:23, '6:53, *<S:2J, 
■6:53,7:25, 9:50. 

FROM FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— '5:15, '6:45, (G:45, 
9:15, "3:15. 

PROM EAST OAKLAND -"5:30, *6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7 
8:00,8:30, 9:00, 9:30,10:00,10:30,11:00, 11:30, 12 
12:30, 1:00, 1:3>>, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5 
5:30, CojO, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57 

Prom BROADWAY. Oakland -*6:37, *6:07, 6:37, 7: 
7:37.8:07,8:37, 9:07, 9:37, 10:07, 10:37. 11:07, 11:37, 12 
12:37, 1:07. 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 6; 
5:37, 6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:06, 10:00, 11:00. 

From ALAMEDA— «5:22, *6:52, '6:22, 6:62, '7:22, 7:52 
"8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 952, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11:52. 
(12:22, 12:52, (1:22, 1:52, 2:52. 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
5:22, ;.::>2, (1:22, 0:52, 7:52. S:52, 9:52, 10:52. 

From BERKELEY — »5:15, *5:45, «0:15, 6:45, *7:15, 7:45, 
*8:15, 8:46, (9;15, 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 8:46, 4:15, 4:45, 6:16, 6:45,6:15, 0:45, 
7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

From WEST BERKELEY — *5:45, *6.15, 6:45, •7:15, 
7:45, 8:45, (9:15, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45,1:45, 2:45,3:45, 
4:15, *5:15, 5:45, •0:15, 6:45, *7:15. 



30, 
00, 
00, 

7:07, 
!:07, 

.:(»7, 



Creek Reme. 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO— *7:15, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15. 3:15, 

6:16. 
From OAKLAND— »6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 
"Sund a ys ex cepted. ^S undays only. ~^~~^~~~_ 

" standard Ti lie" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
A. N. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 

C< >MMMENCING May 4, 1884. and until farther notice, 
Boats aid Trains will leave from and arrive at San 
Francisco Passenger Depot, MARKET-ST. WHARF, 
as follows: 



Week 
Days. 



7:40 a. M. 
5:00 p. m. 
6:30 p. m. 



7:40 a. m. 
5:00 P. m. 



Sundays. 



8:00 a. m. 
5:30 p. m. 



Destination. 



Petalnma, Sundays, 
Santa Rosa & 
Way Stations. 9:10 A. M. 
6:45 p. m. 



Arrive in S. F. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdshurg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Week 
Days. 



0:45 a. m. 
8:50 A M. 

6:10 p. M. 



S:50 A. m. 
6:10 p. m. 



7:10 a. m.|S:0U A m.| Guenicx ille. |(i:45 p. m. |i.i:10 v. m. 

Exc pt I I . I j 
Satur- , 

days. - I Donahue. I I 

3:00 p. si.|8:20 a. m. | |7:00p. m.[ 10:00 a.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol and Ma-k 
West Springs At Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at 
Cloverdale lor Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bav, 
Lakeport, Bartlett Springs. Ukiali. Eureka, Navarro 
Rnlge, Mendocino City, Westport and the Geysers. 



EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturday to Mondav, 
to Pctaluma, SI 75 ; to Santa Rosa, S3 ; to Healdsbur^, 
34 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 



EXCURSION TICKETS good for Sundays only. -To 

PeUUuma, ?1 50 : to Santa Rush, s2 ; to Heuldsburg, S3; 
to Cloverdale, S4 50 ; to Guemeville, S3. 



From San Franc : sco to Point Tihuron and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days-7:40 a. m., 9:20 a. m , 2:00 P. M., 5:00 
p. m., 6:30 p u ; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 9:30 a. m., 12:00 m., 
2:30 p m , 5:30 p. m. 

To San FranciFco from San Rafael, Week Days - 5:40 
A. m., 8:00 a. m., 10 30 A. M ,3:10 p. M, 5:10 P. m; Sun- 
days: 8:10 A. M , 10:45 A. U , 1:10 r. m., 4:P0 p. m., 
5:50 P. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tihuron, Week Days— 
6:10 A, m., 8:20 a m., 10:50 a. m. 3:30 p. m., 5:33 p m.; 
Sunday-: 8:85 a. M., 11:05 a. m., 1:30 p. U..4:20p. u., 
6:10 p m. 



ARTHUR HUGHES. 

General Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



Saucelito— San Eafael— San QuentiD, 

— VIA — 

NORTH PACIFIC COAST 

RAILROAD 

TIME TABLE. 

Commenciiiff Monday, May 12, 1884. and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
run as follows: 

For SAN RAFAEL and SAUCELITO (week days)— 
7:30, 9:15 a. m.; 1:30, 3:20,4:50,6:15 p. m. (Sundavs)— 
8:00, 10:00. ll:3u a. m.; 1:30,4:30, 6:30 p. u. 

From SAN RAFAEL (week days) -6:15, 7:45, 9:20 a. 
m ; 2:00, 3:25, 4:50 p. m. (Sundays)— 7:55, 10:00, 11:30 
a. m.; 3:15, 4:30,6:30 p. m. 



From SAUCELITO (week davs)— 6:45, 8:15, 10:00 A. 
V.; 2:30, 3:55, 5:30 p. u. (Sundays) -8:30, 10:30 a. m .: 
12:00 m.; 345, 5:00,7:10 P. m. 

Extra Trip--From Saucelito, on Saturday, at 7:00 p. m. 



7:30 A.M. and 1:30 P. M. -Daily, Sundavs 
excepted, THROUGH TRAINS for Duncan Mills aiid 
Way-Stations. (Through trains from Duncan Mills ar- 
rives in S. F, at 10:30 a m and 6:00 p. m.) 



Sfa^o Coiiuections. 

Stages leave Duncan Mills every morning except Mon- 
days, for Stewart's Point, Gualala, Point Arena, Cuffey's 
Cove, Navarro. Mendocino City, Caspar, Novo, Kibe- 
sillah, Westport and all points on the north coast. 



>atnrdny to Monday Excursions, 

Excursion Tickets sold on Saturdays, jfood to return 
following Mondav: Fairfax. $1; Camp Taylor, $2; Point 
Reyes, 82.50; Tomales, $3 50; Duncan Mills, $4. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8:00 A.M. (Sundays only)— Excursion Train for 
Duncan Mills and Way-Stations. Returning, arrives in 
San Francisco at 7:40 p. M. 

Fares for Round Trip: Camp Taylor, $1:76 ; Pouit 
Reyes, $2. Tomales, $2 50; Duncan Mills, $3. 

DAVID NYE, F. B. LATHAM, 

Gen'l Superintendent. Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 
GENERAL OFFICES, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET. 




,- C>RAILiR PAD. -<? m 
BROAD tiAl'UE. 



Summer Arrangement. 

Commencing' Sunday, May 4, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townscnd St., between 3d and 4th streets), as follows; 



8. F. 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 
S. F. 



8:30 
t9:30 
10:40 
*3:30 

4:25 
•■5:15 

6:30 
111:45 



.San Mateo, Redwood,,.. 
and Menlo Park.... 



\ 6:40 a.m. 

I * 6:10 a.m. 

i 9:03 a.m. 

| *10:02am. 

Y ■ 3:30 p.m. 

t 4:59 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

1 7:50 p.m. 

J ! t 8:15 pm. 



8:30 A.M j ( 
10:40a.M. i | 
*3:30 p.m. \ ' 

4:25 p.m.! I ■ 





.Santa Clara, SariVoseand. 
..Principal Way Stations. . 



^ I 9:03 a.m 
i *10:Q2 a.m. 
V" 3:36 p.m. 
I ; 6:00p.m. 

) t S:15 p.m. 



10:40 a.m.] [ Gilroy, Pajaro, Castro ville 
'3:30 p.m 11.. .Salinas and Monterey ... 



I 10:02 a m. 
| 6:00 P.M. 



10:40 a.m. I | 
3:30 p..m.|1 ■ 



Hollister and Tres Pinos 



■■H 



10:02 a.m. 
B:00 v h. 



I I Watson ville, Camp Goodall, \ I 
10:40 a.m. ) Aptos, New Brighton, Soquel M" 10:02 A M. 
"3.30 p.m \\ (Camp Capitola) and Santa/" 6.00 p.m. 

I (Cruz ) j 



10:40 a.m.I... Soledad and Way Stations. .. I 0:00 p.m. 



r-W a m I J ..Monterey and Santa Cruz.. J L fl .- fi 
• 50A -"-|1.... (Sunday Excursions) .... M f h ' 55 P ' M - 



♦Sundays excepted. tSundays only. 
Saturdays only. 



(Theatre train 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10.40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, and PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS Stage 
via Santa Clara, which connect with 8:30 a. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS -At Reduced 
Rates— to Monterey, Soquel, Santa Cruz and Pesca- 
dcro ; also to Gilroy, Parais . and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

For Sunday only. {^OMSU^MO^™;^.! for 

For Saturday, f Sold SATURDAY and SUNDAY only ; 
Sunday and-< good for Return until followii g Mon- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip & Sat to Round Trip „ , 
from San ~ u " Mon. from San 



Francisco Co 



75 
1 00 
1 00 



90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 



1 25 I 1 50 
1 25 1 00 
1 25 I 1 75 



Franci CO to 



Mount'nView 
Lawrences. .. 
Santa Clara . 

San Jose 

GUroj 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
Monterey . . . 



SI 50 
1 50 



3 00 

3 00 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 

$2 00 

2 35 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 IHJ 
5 00 



San Bruno.. 
Millbrao .... 
Oak Grove.. 
San Mateo. 

Belmont 

Rclwood. . ., 
Fair Oaks... 
Menlo Park 
May field .... 

TICKET OFFICES Passenger Depot. Townseud 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^~ SOUTHERN DIVISIONS ^a 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 

C. P- R. R. TlMB SCIIKDULK. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

(Branch 8. F. and JV. P. B. It. J 

Boats and Trains Leave San Francisco as follows : 

3. (~\(~\ p m., Daily (Sundavs excepted), from WASH- 
• V-J ^ INGTON-STREKT WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 



Suutlay Excursions. 

8.QA A. M. (Sundavs --nlv), from WASHINGTON- 
.*L\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen a'id Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets: 
To Sonoma, §1; to Glen El'en, SI 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



Suspicion ■ some!imes proves correct, for 
wherever much evil exists constant predictions 
of it in individual cases may hit the mark, but 
there is more wisdom even of a generous trust of 
the dishonest than there is in a continual suspi- 
cion of the upright ; and because we are some- 
times disappointed we should not suspect that 
all mankind study to swindle and deceive. 



Discretion is the proper sauce for cheese. 



July I 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



18 



BIZ. 



Buslncms appears t<> bt llanbh tn DMT .rtroent. 

» '.ir 11. 

from ii of holiday week, for that U about the period vhioo 

our dl oof [odepeodence D 

mu<1 the tin:it imlng ooDtideroou rtringraoy. Complaints are 

r il. payment* an iluw, oolleoUona from the oonntry 

ll from 1 '.itiii-T-t and othon 

formooey to aid on Um BXpaoaM attending Iht grata harvest are daily 

i i more and more urgent. The loam bun aad banking Inetita- 

ma oapitaUeti lueralij bare of late beeo drawn opou very freely 

by the railroad aad other borrowers, end dow oomea in the harve 

and barley, and thej6nd do little difficulty in procuring seeded 

Imports tlm* far in July h^ve been "f oonsiderab] • importanoe and in- 
clmle .% large amount of general Merchandise, that has long been delayed 
by hravy washouts along what Is called the Sunset route. Sume 1,100 
can tbni detained, westward bound, have at last been released from (|uar 
ootina, ati'i the good* ore now arriving here in quantities, to the neal 
relief of oar Tobacconists and other jubbing merchants, who have been 

heavy itufferem by the detention. 

Arrivals from sea Include the following reasels with lending items 
nies: Ship L P. Chapman, 131 days from New York, to John 
RosenTeld, with 600 bbk. Resin. 160 bbls. Sugar, 500 hbla Dye Woods, 
L.000 pkgs, Udse., I; etc Ship Servia, 143 »Uys from New 

fork, to John Etosenfeld, with l.">0 bbls. Tar, 2t*4 bbls. Sngar, 5,000 
pkgs Udse., Hard Wood, Lumber, Iron. Canting!*, etc. Ship Matherer, 
UU days from Philadelphia, to John RosenfeJd, with 275 tons Coal, "2,000 
poo. A-ii Lumber, 10*000 pfegs. mdse., eta Ship Santa Clara, 131 days 
From New fork, to Williams. Dimond k Co., with 1.000 ca. Petroleum, 
i. Renin, 1,416" bbls. Sugar, iu.ihio pki:s. .Mdse., etc. Br. ship 
■). 154 days from Newport, England, to Balfour, Gruthrie & Co., 
with 250 tons Coke, 2,000 Steel Roils, 83 tons Steel Fish Plates, etc. 
Ship T. I'. Oakes, H days from Seattle, with 3,150 tons Coal. Br. ship 
■ ■■-.. 120 days from Liverpool, to -Meyer, Wilson & Co., with 535 
drams Caustic Soda, 700 tons Pig Iron, 1,850 drams Sheep Wash, Ale, 
Beer, Stout, etc.. 1,000 bbls. Sal. Sods and 26,021 bxs. Tin Plate. Bktne 
Ella, 244 days from Honolulu, to Welch & Co., with 7,003 bags Sugar, 90 
bogs Rice, etc. Haw. bark Thomas K. Foster, from Newcastle, N. S. 
W,, to Hugh Craig, with \,7'2'2 tons Coal. Ship Occidental, 8 days from 
X.uiaiiuo, with "_', iso tons Coal to .lohu Kosenfeld. Aureola, 10 days 
from New Tacoma, with 1,350 tons Coal to S. P. R. R. Co. Br. bark 
E irl 1 torby, 78 days from Newcistle, N. S. W., with 1,410 tons Coal to 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. Ship Brown Brothers, 10 days from Seattle, 
with L-ViOOtons Coal to Renton Co. P. M. S. ship San Bias, from Cen- 
tral America, brought up 3,000 bags Coffee and from Smith America 425 
bags Cocoa and from Mexico l.Oiil cs. Limes, etc. Br. ship Iron Duke, 
87 days From Newcastle, X. S. W., has 1,904 tons Coal to Balfour, 
Guthrie ft Co. Steamer Dora, 12 days from Ounalaska, brought Furs 
and Skins to Alaska Com. Co. Steamer Sau Pedro, from New Tacoma, 
had 4,000 tons Coal to Paci6c Improvement Co. Ship Skelmorie, from 
Glasgow, has 1,942 tons Coal and 08,000 Fire Bricks, etc. 

Exports thus far in July include the following leadiug items of cargo : 
To Liverpool, per Br. ship Majestic, 27,000 ctls. Barley, u7,000,bs. Borax, 
13,000 lhs. Borate of Lime, 85,000 lbs. Cotton, 12 04(3 bbls. Flour, 85,000 
ibs. Gold Sweepings, 28.000 Ibri. Silver Ore, 3,504 cs. Salmon, 3,881 ctls. 
Wheat, etc.; value, $129,194. P. M. S. S. Zealandia, for Sydney, carried 
23.0(10 lbs. Coffee, 25,000 lbs. Broom Corn, 2,070 Doors, 1,756 bills. 
Mouldings, 6,225 gals. Whale Oil, 5 955 cs. Salmon, etc.; value, §55,045. 
To Melbourne, 31,055 lbs. Broom Corn. 200 pkgs. Cod-fish, 100 hf-bbls. 
Salmon, etc To Auckland, 162 cs. Salmon, and Mdze. To New Zealand, 
1,240 cs. Salmon, and .Mdze. To Fiji Islands, 216 pkgs. Canned Goods, 
etc. To Victoria, B. C, per Ancon. 5,000 lbs. Bread, 53,000 lbs. Rice, 
736 lbs. Opium, and Mdze ; value, $25,500. To Honolulu, per Consuelo, 
4,639 lbs. Sugar, 380 M Shingles, 122,000 lbs. Bonemeal, etc. To Hono- 
lulu, per Mariposa, 1,854 lbs. Coffee, 150 pkgs. Salmon, 7,640 Posts, 554 
bbls. Flour, and Mdze.; value, $49,000. To China, per City of Tokio, 
75.000 yds. Cottons. 13,546 bbla. Flour, 16,911 lbs. Ginseng, etc.; value, 
$134,309 ; also, in Treasure. §479,929. To Japan, 100 flasks Quicksilver, 
536 bbls. Flour, 8,384 lbs. Sugar, and Mdze.; value. 819,289 ; and in 
Treasure, $130,380.47. To Singapore, 200 cs. Canned Goods. To India, 
625 bbls. Flour. To New York, per P. M. S. S. Granada, 2,008 sacks 
Beans. 85.000 lbs. Pig Lead, 500 flsks Quicksilver, 49,000 gals. Wine, etc.; 
value, S64.728. To Central America, per same, 4,493 bbls. Flour, 5.100 
lbs. Rice; 29,000 lbs. Tallow, and Mdze.; value, $46,000. To Mexico, 
1.500 lbs. Cocoa, and Mdze.; value, 86,950. To Panama, 1,008 bbls. 
Flour, 105,000 lbs. Rice, and Mdze.; value, 825,000. To Kahului, per F. 
S. Thompson, 50 bbls. Flour, 100 M Shingles, and Mdze.; value, §2,224. 
To Tahiti, per Tropic Bird, 37,755 lbs. Bread, 800 bbls. Flour, 27,300 lbs. 
Rice, 33,653 lbs. Sugar, etc.; value, §36,500. To Marquesas, per same, 
Mdze.; value, §2,126. 

Freights and Charters. — Engagements for the week include the fol- 
lowing : Ship Seminole, 1,439 tons, loads Mdse. to New York in Dispatch 
Line. Br. ship Iron Duke (iron) 1,435 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K.. £2. 
Br. bark Earl Derby (iron) 961 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 1*2 5s., 
chartered prior to arrival, Br. ship Thirlmere, 1,711 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K., £2 2s 6d. Br. ship Skelmorlie (iron) 1,550 tons. Wheat to 
Cork, U. K , £2 5s. ; recharter prior to arrival. Haw. bark T. R. Foster, 
1,121 tons, Mdse. to Sydney, owners account. Barkentine Ella, 249 tons, 
Mdse. to Honolulu. Br. iron ship John Gamble, 1,029 tons, Wheat to 
Cork, U. K., £2 2s. 6d., prior to arrival. On the Berth, 26,000 tons ; 
same date 1883, 21,500 tons ; disengaged, 143,400 tons ; same time 1883, 
85,000 tons. Fleet en route, 220,000 tons ; same date 1883, 260,000 tons ; 
do 1882, 300,400 ; do 1881, 356,800. 

Harvesting of Wheat has now become quite general; quality extra 
good; yield great; crop will be very large; present prices, 81 37J@1 40 
per ctl.; very little yet brought to market. Barley harvest is late this 
season, and will be somewhat discolored in quality; price, 82£@95c. for 
good to choice. Oats are coming on nicely, but large fields will" be cut for 
Hay, to make good the deficiency occasioned by the loss by late rains of 
June, which destroyed a vast amount of cut Hay that was exposed. 



SOUTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

Paaacnifor Train, lea. . T 01 HABXST -null. BOOTH MOB, U 

8.Qfi t.M.daflj Alrando, Kewftric. Oaatrarilla, Alvlao, Santa Olan 
■ OU.MM.l.1.,'.., Wrtghl Oleoa IANTA CBUZ 

and all H i 

O'QO ''■ * (Mcepl sun.nw, BipraM lit Ed 

<-.r_>w ,,11. , .,, , aani* dan, 8AM J 081 and all 

Btatlooa t-. BANT \ 0R1 / Pai 

A'SD'" Jl11 l..r -\N .l.i-l . 

^ • c -'-- / BatunUtaandSundajra to Bant* Gnu. 

tt-R K\i l ll-l.is- to SANTA OROZ .....I »i 50 to SAN JOSE on Mil EtDATO 

■P° and SUNDAYS, to return unm MONDAY, ll 

8 •<">("> » «.— EVERY SUNDAY, EXCURSION to SAN JOSE, DIU 
■'-"-'and S.VNI'A CRUZ 
Q3 to Big TroaB and £ ■»! 7.1 l., Santa Clara and San Joao. 

TO OAKLAND AM> AUHF.IIi. 

.•7:OO-7:30-8:i^i :i:30-10:00-1O::i« 11:00 1 1 ::<!> A. ar. 

^12:00 -r: 10— 11:00— 1:30-1 1—8: ... .:.*' -5:40-0:00- 

• 7:00-7:30-8:30—10:46—11:46 i: m. 

From FOURTEENTH AND WBB8TBR SIIIKE'ls. OAKLAND 

...:;.. 7:cK)-7:so-S:ou 1:3 D :00 10* 111*0 11 Oi 

1830- • i:i«i_i:30 — 2:00-2:311— 3:00-3:30— 1:00-1:^0-6:10— 6:30-tl:ui 

. . -10:45-11:45 p. u 
From HIGH STREET, ALAMEDA: ,6:18- s.".:lil 10:10 0:40 7:16 7:40 
s:4ii — »::«— 9:40— Mae— mo:40-uao ■mi, , n, ism ^12:48 1:10 1:40 
10 3:16-8:40-4:;«-4:40-6:lil -6:46-6:16-6:46- 7:10-9:10 -1131 p. u. 

§Sui:da\8 OXCOptod. liSaturun.va and Suiiiluya only. 

TIOKBT. Telegraph and Transfer Office, 222 MONTGOMERY ST., San I . 

L. FILLMORE, Superintendent. K. M. OARBAW, O. F. and 1'. Agent. 



SHIPPING 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



Iteprvaentt tl liy: 

AGENCY OF AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T. COLEMAN & CO.. 

32 RtVEB, STREET, Flavel's Warehouse, 

Chicago, Illinois. Astoria, Oregon. 

MR. EUGENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, 
LONDON, E. C. 

San Fraii<3irsco ;ni<l New York. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

[Jan. 12.] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

H. B. Williams. A. Chesebroi'oii. W. II. DlMOltn. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company. "The California Line o( Clippers," 
from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." March 22. 

C. AD0LPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
8JJT FRAJfCISCO and NEW TORK. 

63^" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery strcete, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

THOMAS PRICET" 

CHEMIOAL LA.BOK.A.TOK.Y, 

Assay Office, Bullion Rooms and Ore Floors. 

g^T* Coin. Returns on all Bullion Deposits in 24 Hours. 

Car.ful Analysis made of Waters, Industrial Products, etc. Mines examined and 
reported upon. Consultations on O. es, Metals, Chemical and Metallurgical subjects. 

524 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

SAN FRASCISCO. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WBOLESJ.LE DEALERS IN FURS. 

[September 21.1 

' GILBERT & MOORE. 

FURNITURE AND CARPETS 

ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN. 
IS and 20 SUTTER STREET San Francisco, Cat. 

MANUFACTORY"— 550 to 572 Brannan street. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Hold Medal, Paris, 1878, 

Sold by all StalioiMTS. Solo A«;eni for the lulled Mtatem 
MR. HENRY HUE. 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

BOZO RADOVICH, 

Importer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Fine Wines and Liquors, 

29 Geary street, San Fraucisco. 

California Wines for Family use a specialty. May 3. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12, 1884. 



MAG AT MONTEREY. 

Dear N. L: Although I'm most worn out with frolickin' I can't 
forget my promise to give you what Ned calls " the details thereof." 
Well, as I told you, ma an' me 'n Ned had euf?asred rooms here O, 
long ago for this period down to Del Monte, an' it'a a mighty lucky 
thirg 't we had done so I can tell you, for such crowds o' folks as has 
kept a pilin' in you never saw, an' all of 'em expectin' the best o' board 
an' lodgin'. TLe fir-tt 's right easy, but when it comes to a room that's 
'nother thing you bet, 'n you should a' just seen the cross expression o' 
some o' the wiminen's faces at not gettin' a spot to theirselves to prink 
up in. Its real agyravatiu' an' no mistake to get to the hotel all tired *n 
dusty an' see lots o' folks a sittin' on the verandah 's cool 's cucumbers, 
an' be told 't you'll have to do the best you can to perform your " twi- 
light " iu a small room with a heap o' strangers (o 1 course they're all 
wimuien, but that don't make it a single bit the pleasanter, although 
more proper). An' that's been the experience o' lots o' folks 't come 
down for the Fourth. It's real funny to see the stavin' efforts some 
ma's is a makin' to settle their daughters, but la me ! most o' the fellahs 
are on the lay for settlin' theirselves, 'n can hardly scrape to g*t along 
single. However, now 'n then there's a stray English tourist or a Eastern 
traveler whose parents is wealthy t turns up, 'n sakes alive ! yon ought 
to see the wimmen go for 'em ! There's a chap here from Balt'more (as 
he calls it) 'ts awful thick with Jessie, (I reckon he's got coin, 'cause he 
drives out 'n so forth). Mrs. Rutherford 's taken Miss Jolliffe under her 
wing, an' some say is a tryiu' to make a match there with a " miling- 
tary " widower. He's awful 'Lentive, an' ma says 't propinquity does 
wonders sometimes. Eileen, which her name it is Ivers, is reckoned 
right good lookin'. Ain't her sister just death on shape ! 

What's become o' young Ben? Has be slipped the noose o' matrimony 
off o' his neck? She has a good time, anyhow, no matter where he is, 'n 
just rolls her eyes round like there weren't no such thing as Bens any- 
wheres. The Judge (who, o' course, had to come down here, too, just 
'cause we was a comin') asked ma why the party above mentioned looked 
like the Fourth in 'Frisco. Ma gave ii up, but I guessed, 'cause " store 
clothes" (closed) is the rule 'bout this time. You should a seen the with- 
erin* look the old Ji'.dge gave me 's he replied, "You're a pert minx," 'n 
then told ma the solution o' his riddle — " 'Cause both's a gen'ral holiday. " 
I'm sure I think my answer the best, don't you? 

I suppose you know 'bout what the life is down here — gettin' up late, 
haviu' cosy breakfasts together, goin' for a swim, lawn tennis, a walk, 
drive or ride, a " lyin' down" to refresh, dress parade (as Ned calls it), 
dinner, music, dancin', flirtin' an' bed — that's 'bout the size of it. It's 
real comical to see some o' the people 'ts here, or to watch their little 
games, whatever they are. There's a couple o' married wimmen who are 
a runnin' neck an ; neck for Charlie Crocker. Lord bless yon, he don't 
care a snap for any one but his wife, but that don't stop the wimmen just 
throwin' theirselves down before him. He's real good, an' always gettin' 
up some kind o' fun or 'nother. Mr. Maynard he just walks round after 
him like a shadow. Don't you know he makes a leal good stepfather (Mr. 
M., not Mr. C), 'n Helen Houston don't seem to appreciate it one single 
bit. O' all the folks down here, though, 't puts on real gushin' frills, it's 
a squatty, over-dressed, loud sort o' woman whose husband is a stage 
owner. She was a poor girl, they say, before he married her, 'n that's 
why she puts on such style now. You should just see her a goin' round a 
tryin' to patronize folks I She's killin' intimate with the Taylor-street 
crowd, who call her Kate. Then another one 'ts very noticeable *s a rich 
Irish widow, but she's real ladylike 'n very popular. Ed. Greenaway was 
kind o' makin up to her 'tother night (I reckon he thinks if she can fur- 
nish coin she'll be most as good as Miss Jenny). Some o* the four-in- 
band teams is real nobby. The Sam Wilsons go out every evenin' an' 
always take some one along (they're real good 'bout that). It's real cute 
to see Belle playin' matron. She's got Jessie in her care, 'n they do say 
't Ryland 's kind o' bankerin' after her — Jessie, I mean — but she don't 
reciprocate. What a stavin' good time Mrs. Arnold does have. She 
don't seem to mind " gettin* on " a bit. She just goes in for havin' a 
good time (like Mrs. Sam Mayer); but la me! she can't brag on her 
trainin' o' young men if all they say o' George just 'bout this period is 
correct. (By the wa.y, " can any one tell when he began to take front 
rank as a musician ?" is the Judge's latest). Wonder who'll be the next 
one to have " disclosures " made on him ? 

Well, here I am a runnin' on an' I haven't told you yet what we all did 
'n are doin'. Well, we've had an awful nice picnic, 'n a swimmin match, 
'n fireworks, 'u a dance ; an' we're keepiu* the ball rollin' so far's dancin's 
concerned every night, though o' course Saturday nights is best, on 'count 
o' the beaux bein' more numerous. The Taylor girls is great favorites 'n 
are real sweet, too. Minnie Mizner's always got lots o' 'tention, too. 
The Baron arrived the other night, 'n was warmly welcomed. The Judge 
asked a certain lady 't was goin' for him (the Baron I mean, not the 
Judge) pretty extensively, why she might rest easy if she caught him? 
(You can imagine she kind o' lumped up at suph 'n expression 's that ?) 
But the old Judge he told her 'cause she'd be *n good hands. D'ye see? 
The last gossip is 't the fat goody goody boy's a lookin 'round for a mate, 
haviu' made up his mind to go the whole hog in the respect'ble line. 
He's been goin' the rounds o' his acquaintances for some time on a kind 
o' prospectin' tour. It seems 't some o' the pa's they was makin' en- 
quiries 'bout his mental capacity, 'n so forth, 'n Ned says 'twas real com- 
ical to see the expression on one old chap's face when he was askin' the 
family physician 'bout the head o' the "subject." He told him there was 
nothin in it. I guess it don't take a doctor to find that out ! 

Well, now the battle o' the Fourth is over we are a settlin' down into 
kind o' sets. The young dove couple, 's they are called, are here spoonin' 
round, an' though the children is here, too, gran'ma keeps 'em close to her 
(the youngsters, not the couple), so they aint in the way. Every one was 
real glad to see Mrs. Hearst, she's so sweet and good, 'n Mrs. Collier 's an 
awful nice lady, too. But I just tell you what 'tis, as to the men kind, 
there's a mighty poor article tloatin' round. Paul was doin' the Paul-'n- 
Virginia act (carryin' a girl 'cross a stream), the other day, 'n got caught 
in the act, 'n haven't the girls heen pokin' fun at him ever since? You 
bet! My letter 's so long I must stop till next time, though I haven't 
said half I meant to; but it '11 keep — an' you just see what a real inter- 
estin' letter I'll seud you next week, or my name aint Mag. 



T 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

be Company's steamers will sail for Hougboiigr, via 

YOKOHAMA, as follows: 

CITY OP PEKING ..JULY 26th, at 12 o'clock m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at reduced rates. 

For X>w York, via Panama: 

SAN BLAS JULY 15th, at 10 o'clock A. M., 

Taking freight and passengers for MAZATLAN, SAN BLAS, MANZANILLO, AC- 
APULCO, SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA and LA LIBEEtTAD, and via ACAPULCO 
for other Mexican and Central American ports. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and Sydney: 

CITY OF SYDNEY SATURDAY, AUGUST 2d, at 12 o'clock m., 

Or lniiuediiittfly on arrival of the English mails. 
Ten Dollars additional is charged for Upper Cabin passage. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
[July 12.J 



WILLIAMS. DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

For Japan and China.— Leave Wharf Corner First and 
BRANNAN STREETS at 12 o'clock noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONG- 
KONG, connecting: at Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai; 

SAN PABLO CAPT. REED JULY 12th, 1384 

Will nut carry cabin passengers. 

OCEANIC CAPT. METCALFE 

ARABIC CAPT. PEARNE 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s 
General Office, Room 74, cor. Fourth and Towusend sts. 
For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street. Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Acrent. 
LELAND STANFORD, Pre sident. JulyJ12. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
as follows : 
For Victoria, B. C, and Puget Sound Ports: tO a. h., JULY 2d, 10th, 18th, 26th, 
and AUGUST 3d, and every eighth day thereafter. The fiist steamer of the month 
connects at Port Townsen'd with steamer "Idaho" for Alasrta. 

For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. and N, Co.: Every five dayB. 
For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obispo, 
Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, excepting San Diego, every fifth dftj a. m. 

For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, at 9 o clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday, at 3 P. m. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Ntreet, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., General Agents, 
[July 12.] No. 10 Market street. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

Tbe Ore<on Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coa^t Steamship Company will dispatch from Spear-street Wharf, for the 
above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA and OREGON. 

Sailing Days: 
jtjly 3—8—13—18-23 -28, AUGUST 2, and every following Five 

Days, at 10 o'clock a. m.. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lilies for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
[July 5. J No. 10 Market street San Francisco. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE 

For Ensenaila, Magdalen a Bay, Cape St. Lucas, Mnzatlau, 
LA PAZ and GUAYM AS.— The Steamship NEWBERN, E. T. ROGEIiS, M*S- 
ter, will leave for the above ports on 

TUESDAY JULY 8th, 1834, at 10 o'clock A. H., 

FROM WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF. 

Through Bills of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will 

he received on Tuesday, July 2d. No freight received after Monday, July 7th 

at 12 o'clock m., and BUIs of Lading must be accompanied by Custom-House and 

Consular clearances. For Freight or Passaic apply to J. BIRMINGHAM, Agent, 

jJulv fi.] 



No. 10 Market street. 



R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOR HONOLULU Theiplemlld new 3000-ton Steamships 
will leave the Company's wharf, eorner of Steuart and Harrison sts., at 3 i\ M.: 

AL\MED\ TUESDAY, JULY lf.th 

MARIPOSA. FRIDAY, AUOUST 1st 

EXCURSION TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
For passage or further particulars apply to 

J. D. SPBECKELS & BROS., Agents, 
f July 12.1 ^27 Market at. t corner Fremont. 

I I I "T" "T" I. I f— 1 of Every Description, 

_!_ _L_ ' * I I K..J For Decorations. 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 
311, SIS. 315 niiil 317 Market street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California SHviu^ anil Loan Society, Northwest cor- 
ner Powell a-id Eddystreets -For the half year ending June 30, 18i4, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four and one-half (4J) percent, pur annum on 
term deposits, and three and seventy-five one-hundredtlis (3 75-100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxed, payable OU and after July 1, 1881. 
By order. VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



Jul) 12, 



CALIFORNIA AI'VKKTISKK. 



10 



MONSTROUS FRAUD IN HUMBOLDT COUNTY RED- 
WOOD LAND. 

In our luuo of Juno Slat, referring t<> the Ham bold I oouDtp 
wlii, -d the Siw<< 1 .1 i i m; mu the Hi st i" unearth 
i_d make Iniown to the publto, we showed up lbs isandaeiiiui character 
•t ill.- - lb* lux) wood Company ■ •{ London, ai well u thai nl 

Mr. H the Lonoon branch of Palknar, Bell & 

latter ol whom, in face ol the Eacl thai be know to 
ui the x ski ■ i speak ul the Niwh 1 .: 

a blai kmailinK «hwt, n '• kimw thai there Is ool 

ium arard ol truth in the article," in which the exposure of the brand 
r made known through these columns. In tb il allualon 

waa m i mpany be name. W I tted Bret the law in 

retatlun t" tUnoet lande and quoted in full From the United Statea 
■tntntaa at large. So far, at least, Mr. Hear; Dalbaii Sarriaon ia a sell 
oonvioted Ealainer, for tin* existence of the statute was known to him. 
Next we stated that a syndicate bad been formed to get possession <>f jni- 
meoae tnuta ul timber land In Hnmboldl coftaty, and tnat, in deuanci 
of law and by dint oi the moat astounding fubornation of perjury. Do 
inbeeqnent revelations boar us out ! The L tod * Iffioe at Washington has 
luepended the lamanoa of all patents f>»r timber lands throughout the 
md this solely on Mcount off these fraudulent attempts, and this 
Fact also was well known to the veracious gonateman, Mr. Henry Datbaio 
Berriaoo. Does that look as if there was '*not one word of truth in 
the am In wa stated that the parties engaged in the Fraud 

were Mr. J. 1>. Walker, of the firm of Falkner, Bell & Co., through 
bands the purchase and other moneys passed, while a Air. 
Streeten, (who Found it onnr anient to leave the country, and is now in 
London, where he is doubtless on intimate relations with that truthful 
persona^-, Mr. Henry Dalbaic Harrison,) with a Mr. David Evans, were 
iIih active ayents in Humboldt county. Mr. David Evans is awaiting 
liis trial under an indictment For subornation of perjury, while Mr. J. 
1 1. Walker evades the charge of being implicated in the matter by seem- 
ingly ignoring the fact of any knowledge on hU part of Mr. Evans' 
agency in the fraud, and plaintively say-, "Iff Mr. David Evans waa 
o inoerned in an attempt to secure timber lands he was actio- for himself 
and nut For the company whose agent he is." If Mr. Walker was so 
Ignorant of the matter and so innocent, why was this vast interest con- 
veyer] to ium by Evans! Was he not paid a large commission ou the 
purchase? Do not these revelations bear us out in our original state- 
ments and prove Mr. Henry Dalbaic Harrison to be a self-convicted 
falsi ner ? 

The true solution of the matter is this: That the Redwood Company, 
now that the fraud has been exposed, tind it desirable to disavow auy 
connection on their part with the parties concerned in it, but admit that 
persons connected with the company are also connected with the Syndi- 
cate charged with the attempted steal. If the Redwood Company were 
innocent why did they " tind the cap to fit them " so readily ? They pro- 
Fess to be, and probably are. the successors of five local lumber firms, 
whose lands they bought, and who, unquestionably, were paid in stock of 
the company, and, strange to say, are now connected with the Syndicate 
in the attempted grab. It is the patents for these lands which, it is pos- 
sible, may be those said to be deposited for the security of the debenture 
holders in the Central Trust Company, in New York. What number of 
acres they embrace, and what proportion their value bears to the amount 
of stock issued by the company, it behooves the debenture holders to 
inquire. If, as has been reported, shares have been issued to an amount 
representing not only those supposed to be secured by the patents in New 
York, but to an amount based upon the belief that the fraudulent at- 
tempt to get possession of the 534 suspended patents, representing nearly 
ninety thousand acres, would prove successful, and that these latter, cost- 
ing 82 50 an acre, were estimated by the company at from t*n to twenty 
dollars an acre, and such shares have been placed upon the market, then 
to just that extent the public have been defrauded. That there has been 
collusion in this matter with Government officials, either here or in Wash- 
ington, is beyond all question. The carelessness and indifference of some 
of those whose duty it is to guard the interests of the Government in 
some casiB amounts to criminality. That strenuous efforts will be made 
to get the patents issued by the Land Office is beyond all question, and if 
money is required to carry out the nefarious schemes of the plotters, there 
will be plenty forthcoming. In regard to Evans, Beach and Marks, now 
under indictment, there is every confidence felt in the United States Dis- 
trict Attorney's office that they will be enabled to secure their conviction, 
notwithstanding the fact that most of those who might be made available 
as witnesses, and who can be found, are unavailable as such, for all have 
been guilty of perjury in swearing to their application. We know not 
bow for Messrs. Falkner, Bell & Co. may regard their action in this mat- 
ter as legitimate business, but we venture the assertion there is no other 
house in San Francisco, of like standing, that would engage in it. 

We purpose, in our next issue, to show how the experts MenzieB and 
Blythe examined this property in the interests of the English stock- 
holders. Also, the worth of the opinion of the attorneys who passed 
upon the title. We advise investors to go slow until the true state of 
affairs is fully investigated. The United Stales authorities are at one 
end, and the News Let-ten at the other. We have "the bull by the 
horns" this time, and, as usual, we propose to fight the matter to the 
bitter end. The accusation of "blackmailing" will, in the long run, 
prove rather strange, coming from the source of Falkner, Bell & Co., 
the great representatives of Euglish capital in California. 

The attention of gentlemen who desire to make an investment in 
choice vineyard property is directed to a piece of Santa Clara County 
real estate, which is now in the hands of Messrs. Woodward & Beach, 
No. 10 Montgomery street, for disposition. The property is situated on 
the main county road, between San Jose and Los Gatos. It is planted 
with two and three year old vines, and several hundred fruit and orna- 
mental trees. It will be sold in lots from 20 acres upward, to suit pur- 
chasers. 

To Rent, Furnished. — A nice, comfortable cottage in Alameda, com- 
plete for housekeeping, will be rented for the Summer. It is but a min- 
ute's walk from the Park Hotel. For further particulars apply to Mrs. 
Owen, Regent street, near San Jose" avenue, Alameda. 



OUR PILGRIMS. 
KtnR Kalaknua'a domlntonn, In the fa ofl cannibal blende, when 
circumnavigator, I 'apltaln < !ook, was 

ul cow the paradise "f ant ■ (<-w ..i th< 
Down "of San bYaucUoo. The King la fond -f wine, w»m< 
u-railv. He loves haata "f fat things, dell 
fellowa who oan teaoD him how to do |L and generally Is intent m 
am. Tbnes who are running him foi " all be li worth." di-. > n hi 

pander to his tastes ana fool him to the topol bu bent Be flndi 
hi- happiness In congenial companions, and they Bnd theii pi 

In the lunsbii t royalty. The mors astute mlndi in th 

Round laugh and _-i , lefa in the presence ol wfa it is going on. 

This is all well enough in its way. Tropical suns and tropical ways smlla 

on congenial souls who have been specially seleoted For theii _tn< m. Fat, 
lusty, genial, good souls, they oan dine and win.- and folreandpn 
be naughty and nice, and all this, to fool a king, and at the exp 

Bni QOial backers who know what they are about. Verily, modern times 

have not produced such a Beshly paradise, or such appropriate denizens of 

i'. May their shadow never grow less ! The missonaries, bow, 
main to !»' heard from. 

If you Wish to enjoy Sum lav take a run down to Monterey or Santa 
Cruz on the S. P. R, K train which leaves fourth and Town ,.-n,| 

at 7:50. Return tickets only S3, 



Vineyard and Orchard Property 

FOR SALE, 
In 20, 25, 30, 40 or 60 Acre Tracts, to Suit. 

BEST BARGAINS IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY! 

This Property is located on main county rood, between San .lose and Los Qatos 
three-fourths of a mile from railroad station, and near [jood school and church 

This Vineyard consists ol two and three-year-old, next Winter, ol choicest variety 
ol Foreign vines; also TWO HUNDRED Choice APRICOT TKKEs TfliU'K iirv 
DRED ORNAMENTAL TREE3,etc Boil unsurpassed by anj to California 

Thi* Propcriy. with a'] Improvements, is offered: at about the price ol unimproved 
land in that vicinity, and presents an opportunity to purchasers seldom met with. 

For particulars apply to 

WOODWARD & BEAOH, Eeal Estate Agents, 

10 Montgomery st.San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

NewBnsll C'onsoliilnteil Urn vol Wining Company Location 
nf principal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location of works 
Placer county, California. Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors, held on the Oth day ol July, 1884, an assessment of Five (a) Cents per 
.share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Monthly, the ISth Day of August, 1884, 

Will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 

made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 9th day ol September, 1884, tu pay 

the delinquent assessment, together with cost of advertising and expenses ol Bale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

[July 12.] 625 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 30 

Amount per Share Fifty Cents 

Levied ruly 9th,1884 

Delinquent in Office. August I4th, 18S4 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2d 1881 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 30!) Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NO. ONE HUNDRED AND SIX. 

Tbe Home Mnlnal ItiNiirnucc Company will pay its Ke&rii- 
lar Monthly Dividend of One Dollar ($1) per share upon its capital stock on 
July 10th, 1884. (Has. r. STORY, Secretary. 

SKIN DISEASES CUBED IN A FEW DAYS. -SULPHOLINE LOTION Re- 
moves Eruptions, Pimples, Redness, Blotches, Scurf, in a few days. Is highly 

successful in Eczema, Psori wis, Pruriffp, Tetter, etc. it totally destroys many deep- 
seated, inveterate skin affections Must agreeable to use. In Great Britain SUL- 

BHOL1N E is the one Skin Remed y 

SULPHOLINK LOTJON.-ANY ONE, HOWEVER DEEPLY AND APPAR- 
ently hopelessly afflicted with Skin Disease, should apply SULPHOLINE as 
quickly as possible. In two or three days the effect will become evident in a dimin- 
ished appearance ol the malady, a growing tendency to fade away, and complete 
obliteration of the eruption. Sold everywhere by chemists, etc. 

SULPHOLINE LOTION.— AS A REMEDY FOR PIMPLES, BLOTCHES, RED- 
ness. Rashes, Blemishes, Spots, Roughness, Discoloration, Eczema, Rosea, Pi- 
tyriasis, Prickly Heat, Salt Rheum, Scurf and General Irritability of the Skin, SUL- 
PHOLINE acts like a marvel. None of these eruptions can withstand it, The 
LOTION attacks them all by some depurative action, and brings the skin out clear 
and healthy. SULPHOLINE is beautifully fragrant. Made only by JOHN PEPPER 
& CO., London, England. 

Sold by WAEELEE & CO., Montgomery and Bush, streets, 
San Francisco. 

LIVER PILLS— DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS. THE GREAT ENGLISH MED- 
icine. Established 70 years. 

LIVER PILLS.-DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS, CONTAINING DANDELION 
and Quinine, without Mercury, are far above nil others as the surest, mildest 
and best means of removing obstructions and irregulanti.s of the Liver and Stom- 
ach, Headache, Biliousness. Shoulder Pains. Indigestion, Cousti, at'on, Flatulence, 
Torpidity, bo insuring perfect health. DR. ICING'S PILLS are sold everywhere. 
Kept by WAKELEE & CO., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AtfD 



July 12, 1884. 



PASSING REMARKS. 

The recent panic in the East sufficiently demonstrated how uni- 
versi lly the spirit and practice of gambling are diffused among the bankers 
and other business men supposed to be attached to methods purely legiti- 
mate. But even a panic was powerless to reveal the almost universal 
gambling prevalent among all classes. In great commercial centers, bank 
officials take their own money and that of their depositors and invest in 
stock, grain or oil margins. Business men and manufacturers become dis- 
couraged by the apparently slow accumulation of profits, and rush into the 
most reckless of speculative ventures. The infection has spread rapidly, 
until every community in the country — however small a place — is full of 
the devotees of speculation. There is not a village the country over, so 
small but what it does not count among its inhabitants men who have 
thrown money into this capacious hopper of gambling and been crushed 
between the relentless upper and nether mill-stones — the bulls and bears 
of the Exchange. 

When the gambling spirit has not taken the direction of margin specu- 
lation, it has found still humbler but no less dangerous outlets. Lotteries, 
policy shops, cards, dice, a thousand other games, and betting— betting on 
any and every subject— cheerful or melancholy, iroral or immoral, digni- 
fied or undignified, important or puerile — that admits of controversy. 
There is not an event of possible happening but what is turned into a 
wager. The only limitation to this that I know of, is that of the imagina- 
tion to conjure up impossibilities and improbabilities, as well as possibili- 
ties and probabilities. The negative of a betting proposition affirming a 
simple truism will find takers if sufficient odds are offered to make the 
transaction a speculative one. This betting mania is one of the most 
marked mental characteristics of the present generation. It is a revolu- 
tionary mania. Its workings are radical. It destroys all differences of 
race, of rank and of station. It removes all inequalities of social or pecu- 
niary position. It places on a common footing the proletariat and the 
aristocracy, the communists and the monopolists. The bluest-blooded son 
of Beacon street will bandy words with a hod-carrier as to the terms of a 
wager. The wildest, longest-haired disciple of Herr Most will yell to a 
Vanderbilt to put up his dollar, and the Vanderbilt will put it up. The 
universality of this spirit is remarkable. It is a mad rush after money, 
without the disagreeable necessity of earning it, pervading every scale of 
life. 

***** 

I wonder what has become of Paul Frenzeny ? He was a remarkable 
fellow — a sort of universal genius. As au artist, he could have taken very 
high rank. He possessed a thorough technique— his drawing and color- 
ing were beyond criticism. He had the true feeling of artistic beauty. 
In scientific matters he was well versed. He had a thorough knowledge 
of technical engineering. He was thoroughly well versed in English and 
German literature, as well as in that of his own country. He bad the 
knack of imparting his knowledge in a clear, comprehensive manner. He 
was a charming conversationalist, equally at ease when discussing 
Meissonier or Edison, Shakespeare or De Lesseps. But he was a victim 
to erraticalness. It drove him from continent to continent, from a studio 
to a coffee plantation, from a ship's hammock to a bivouac on the field, 
from a salon to a sheepherder's hut. He was a wanderer by taste. In 
the French acceptation of the word, he was at ypical Bohemian. As well 
educated as he was in everything else, in financial matters he had been 
taught but two axioms — borrow and spend. His rambliogs can be traced 
by delicious little sketches, gifts to friends, who, overlooking the donor's 
faults, cherish these souvenirs of a genial and talented fellow. 

***** 

Our love of brag has, of late years, had but little sustenance. Our big 
squashes have become big chestnuts. Our seals are as well known to 
New Yorkers and Londoners as they are to us. Our wine is drank abroad 
with as wry faces as we put on when compelled to taste it. Our climate 
has gone back, so to speak, on ns. Denis Kearney is an obscurity now. 
In fact there has been nothing about which we could brag. But some- 
thing has occurred, and we can flap our wings and crow. (Talking of 
crows, that of Buttons, in The Rajah, is the most irresistible I have ever 
heard.) Let me introduce to you, chess champion Redding! He has met 
the redoubtable Zukertort and has vanquished him. The Milpitas at- 
tack of the renowned player was successfully resisted by the Alameda 
G-amba of our own disciple of Palamedes, who then, by the addition of a 
few dashing moves, forced the world's champion to surrender ! It was a 
victory to be proud of. I am requested to deny authoritively the ru- 
mor that for a few hours preceeding the game Dr. Z. had been with great 
receptibility the guest of the usual delightful Bohemian Club conviviality. 
* * * * * 

A political campaign without catch-phrases would be an anomaly in 
this country. The principal one so far developed is, " The woods are full 
of 'em." In The Rajah this phrase is used by the hero in reference to the 
approach of a band of striking colliers. Its political actuality earns for 
it nightly a round of applause. The mental quickuess with which we 
Americans seize upon the ludicrous side of anything and everything, and 
the sharp and ready manner in which we meet satirical attacks, are char- 
acteristics well illustrated by Republican clubs paraphrasing Pack's " Tat- 
too " by speaking "f " beating the tattoo to call the voters together! " 

Grocer — How much sand have you put in that sugar? 

Clerk— About a peck. 

Grocer— What! only a peck ? Put in a bushel or two. 

Clerk — A bushel or two? Great St. Saccharine! Do you want to 
ruin your trade ? 

Grocer— Certainly not. A bushel of sand, more or less, won't be 
noticed now. 

Clerk— Why won't it? 

Grocer — This is strawberry time! 

* * * * * 

The cartoons of Life mark a new era in pictorial journalism. They 
are dainty, delicate and artistic in execution, and withal bold and vigor- 
ous iu meaning and emphasis. Among the clever artists producing these 
charming drawings is Harry McVickar, the son of Ex Commodore 
McVickar, of the New York Yacht Club. The McVickars were once 
one of the richest families in New York society, one of the daughters 
being captured by some English Earl. Reverses of fortune reduced 



father and son to a necessity of earning a livelihood. The old gentleman 
is now a successful importer of fine wines, and the son has made use of 
his natural talent as a drawer with gratifying results. Harry McVickar 
was a fellow-traveler of mine on a trip across the Atlantic. He is a typi- 
cal American gentleman, well educated, well bred and well trained. Both 
mind and body are perfectly developed. He is a good talker and a 
splendid athlete, and in all respects a good fellow. I rejoice at his 
success. ■ Clairreau. 

Progressive Science in Optics. — There is no calling requiring such 
constant study as that of a first-rate optician, to whom the progressive 
developments of the present day continually present new difficulties and 
poblems to solve. By close attention to his profession, aud over thirty 
years' practical experience, C. Mcller, the well-known optician, 135 
Montgomery street, has gained for himself the gratifying distinction of 
being the leading optician of the Pacific Coast. All complicated cases of 
defective vision most carefully tested free of charge. Sole depot Pebble 
pectacles. 

Ventilation.— Messrs. Robert Boyle & Son, of 64, Holborn Viaduct, 
have received an extensive order from the Russian Government for their 
large-size patent self-acting air-pump ventilator, to be applied for the 
ventilation of the Imperial Manufactory of State Papers, St. Peters- 
burg. This order is the result of the success of the air-pump ventilators 
applied to the Imperial Mint and Imperial Bank-note Manufactory, St. 
Petersburg, those being pronounced by the Government officials to be 
the only ventilators tried which have fully answered their purpose, and 
effectually kept out the snow in the winter. 



BLAINE 



Agents wanted for authen- 
tic edition of his life. Pub- 
lished at Augusta, his 
home. Largest, handsomest, cheapest, best. 
By the renowned historian and biographer, Col. 
Comvell, whose life of Garfield, published by 
us, outsold the twenty others by 60,000. Out- 
sells every book ever published in this world; 
many agents are selling fifty daily. Agents 
are making fortunes. All new beginners suc- 
cessful; grand chance for them; $43 50 made 
by a lady agent the first day. Terms most lib- 
eral. Particulars free. Better send 25 cents 
for postage, etc., on free outfit, now ready, 
including large prospectus book, and save 
valuab'e time. 

ALLEN & CO , Augusta, Maine. 



CONTRACT FOR FALL AND WINTER SUPPLY OF COAL! 

FOR YOUR HOUSE OR STORE. 



Special Kates for Five Tons. Prices Furnished on Application. 

Telephone 308. 



CHAS. R. ALLEN, 
120 Beale street. 



GEO. STREET, Agent News Xetter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 



LIEBIG 




COMPANY'S 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Annual Kale, 

8,000,000 Jars. 

Finest and Cheapest 
Meat- Flavoring Stoc7c 
for Soups, Made Dishes 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with the fac-simile of BARON LIEBIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink acro-s Label. The title " BARON LIEBIG " and his photograph having- 
been lately largely used by dealers having- no connection with BARON LIEBIG, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEBIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S guarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tunic iu all cas?s uf weak digestion and debility. 

41 Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medical 
Press, Lancet, BHtisk Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers. Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. DAVID & CO., 9 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England 

Sold Wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold. Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

MANTELS and GRATES, MONUMENTS and MEAVSTONES, 
In Marble and Scotch Granite, 

827 Market street bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

SS" Send for Designs and Prices. W. H. ±11 c CO It MIC It. 

SAVAGE & SONS 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE "WORKS 
Nos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CABLE-ROAD 

CASTINGS, QUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON GuODS. 

6^- Estimates Free. Feb. 23. 



Juh 18, 1884 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTI8ER 



17 



NOTAB1LIA. 



THE PEODLERB SONG. 



1,^*11 m whttc •» '.riven mi ; 

»k rwvM ; 

iMckbr*, amWr ; 
Pamum tat » .**.•>'• aooinbor; 



■ 

For my hi r 1 imi 

poktaMllcki "( ■tool. 
« ii*t n 

bm buj ,< onu boj , 
Buy, UcU, oralfc your I*mos <t> 

William BOAUraaal. 



I' i ■* ih. in iii, gnat tnd -*in ill, 
a I ■lender, short sod tall ; 
m light, far iiinl wide 
" I ifevan tide. " 

ilion, put them down 
i railway " Move Dp " 



The Lay of the Horse Car. 



With i 



' frown. 



»' Dp 

■ Who wis!, to ri.|r>, 

" l fOTfea penonfl "ii .i side, " 

Sh.mM t I i> in. m imiuc ithniw, 

him wiih ■ leathern thong; 
Let no big m in dan dirida 

" l. -\ en p tn »na on i 



»vy woman sigh, 

ibor'i I high. 

" Nu't thi-* fe tittle soldo, 

Xeveo PWaoni on fe I 

For wo are the V. H. EL, 

Own each fare us well a* car. 

All must by our rules abide, 

" 'Leven persons on a side." 

I'ut if any mi 

With nnnvrooa sisters, pretty dears, 

Yoo must quickly then decide, 

" Twenty persons on a Bide." 



Madame X. receives a visit from her doctor. After a perfect deluge 
ol tolk oho oonolndes t>y asking him: " What would yon advise me to 
toko, d wtoi ': " A rest, madame ; a rest." " Bat my tongue, doctor, 
bm niv tongue." " Ali! yes, 1 see, Madame ; ■ rest, above all things: a 
net" And then he went home and told bis wife that delicious lunches, 
una, pastries, eonfeotione, eta, can always be obtained at Swains, 
Sutter street. 

Harlem oarsmen feather their oars when they want to fly, and San 
Francisco ladies, when they want to have a thorough house cleaning, call 
in the services of Messrs. J. Bpaulding & Co., of the Pioneer Steam 
Carpet beating and Renovating Works, Nob. 353 and 355 Tehama street. 
This fir-in owns the only machine on the Pacific Coast which beats carpets 
exclusively ou the back. Thorough satisfaction guaranteed. 

It Is very hard for a married man to realize that the woman whose 
voice strikes terror to his heart is tilt- same pink and white little creature 
who used to almost faint at the sight of a beetle. 

"Here is a squib for you,- funny column," said the President of the 
Punsters' Oiub: "A baker cannot make a fire-cracker of a torpid dough." 
The editor exploded with wrath, while the perpetrator of the double end- 
ed pan burst into a laugh, and went off 'to purchase one of those fashion- 
able and well-made Hats sold by White, No. 614 Commercial street. 

Bigsby was telling Blobson about a friend who was injured in a rail- 
road accident. *' He ought to have got heavy damages from the road," 
s id Blobson. '* He did," replied Bigsby: " he got both legs and an arm 
broken. 11 But, notwithstanding that, he still remembers that the Imper- 
ishable Paint, sold by J. K. Kelly ft Co., Market street, is more econom- 
ical and more reliable than any other. 

The fashionable dressing for ladies' hair during the summer is to be 
three hundred years old. The bair will be, of course, modern, and of 
the best quality in the market. — Com. Advertiser. 

One steamer which sailed from New York for Europe last week car- 
ried eleven clergymen. New York clergymen are obliged to leave that 
wicked city now and then to preserve their self-respect. Everybody un- 
derstands that, but instead of going to Europe, they should come to Cal- 
ifornia, and then they could have their pictures taken by those great pho- 
tographic artists, Bradley &■ Rulofson, Geary and Dupont streets, San 
Francisco. 

"Pa," asked the small boy of the family, "why do they now have cow- 
catchers on engines ? " "Because, my sou," replied pa, "because — the 
fact is, they have them in order to catch the stock when they want to 
water it ; but, nevertheless, P. J, Cassin & Co., Washington and Bat- 
tery streets, continue to sell pure and unadulterated Liquors in retail 
quantities at wholesale rates." 

Hoops are once more coming into fashion, but they will be worn on 
barrels, — Com. Advertiser. 

Almost every person has some form of scrofulous poison latent in his 
veins. When this develops in scrofulous sores, ulcers or eruptions, or 
takes the form of rheumatism or organic diseases, the suffering that en- 
sues is terrible beyond description. Hence the gratitude of those who 
discover, as thousands yearly do, that Ayer's Sarsaparilla will thoroughly 
eradicate this evil from the system. 

James Hanrahan, Real Estate Brokerand General Collector. 810,000 
to loan on mortgages. Office, 319 Sansome street, American Exchange 
Building. Refers, by permission, to Hon. P. H. Roach and Hon. John 
Shirley. 

The man In tbe moon is an economical chap. He never gives up his 
last quarter. — A'. Y. Journal. 

To most children the bare suggestion of a dose of castor oil is nau- 
seating. Why not, then, when physic is necessary for the little ones, use 
Ayer's Cathartic Pills ? They combine every essential and valuable prin- 
ciple of a cathartic medicine, and being sugar-coated are easily taken. 

Boncuti is an excellent remedy for sore or chapped hands. Miners 
and Mechanics whose bands are hard and rough from exposure or injured 
by minerals will rind Boncuti softening, cleansing, soothing and healing. 

Artificial blushes are the pink of fashion, and Dr. Rowas' Famous 
Remedy is a sure cure for sea sickness. L. R, Ellert & Co., California 
and Kearny streets, are agents for it. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 
Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724.V Market St., S. F. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Becordod to. the Olty and Count v of Sun Francisco California for 
the Week, ondlnir July 7, 1684. 

Compile I from th* H*&*rd* OJ \al Auenty, 401 VtUtfornta St. , S. V, 

Monday. June 30th 



OKANTOHAND OHANTRK. 



J_ 



il'TloH. 



■ >.iifi ... K Howard. KM t 

In m BM . 

i 17:6. Larklo, 968:911 

i u i 18111 

B Uow.nl, 215 « Mlb, I 

lo H B M 

N Jackal hi n Pierce, » 8 

WA 121 

K Bornhclm in Geo W Frii.k N llaie.1,1, I ill .• Klllm.ir,- , w Bl93, be- 

afargtj Ryan to Alice M Pearl 



.1 BBouell lo i: U Wnt ... . 
Unlit Howe tnt M Qraham.... 
Jno Ballard lo Goo W Bowers.. 



In. In H a MO 

. . Nw Nnrwi, h :\in 



and Teha 

Ids in I. urn 57 and mi ; I ini -in in - 

I M In No i 

C'hiisW Randall to Jacob Goldlicr- B California, 81:8 w Bikor, « 96x100; 
| slaliliiniiii, 100:0 c Lyon, c 25xl.'i7:ti 

\V A 581 

Chas W Randall loE Relnliold....|W Baker,75n Pine, n 26x106:8, being 
I in W A 681 .. .. 



PIUI'X 



11,808 

lo.noo 

7.500 

8,0110 

600 

1,200 

2,809 
1,1TB 



Tuesday, July 1st. 



Michl D Sweeney to G Buchholz. . 
F M McAllister to J McAllister.... 

Harry B Church to Emma F Church 
Marcus Modry to Edwtl \V Kunyon 
Dan Meyer et ftl to Elise Robertson 

LENoonantoDP Hlckey 

Allen StJ Bowie to AJ Bowie 

M F Tarpey to R C Woolwortb .... 



S Grove, 137:0 w Franklin, c 80x180 
w A Hill 

Undivided two-ninths e Montgomery, 
08:9 ii clay, ii 34:8x187:8, and niiili- 
vitled two-nlntba of livo-lliirils nw 
lirunim anil Clay, u 91:8x187:8 

s California, 237:6 w Scott, w 37:u.xl37: 

8 W A 1110 

W Devisadero, 100 n Uush, n 25x100- 
W A .'.02 

s Qrove, 105 e Laguna, e 25x;2o, being 

ill W A 203 

8 Clay, 148:9 w Bleiner, »■ 26x127:4, be- 
in W A 891. 

E Stockton, 68:9 >■ Vallejo, e 0S:'.ixlH7:0 
-58-varu92 

W Guerrero. 241 s 21st, e 33x117:0, be- 
ing in M B 



*3,810 

8,000 
1 
1,800 
2,175 
5 
2,600 
4,500 



Wednesday, July 2nd. 



Timothy F Scott lo Ah Mum; et al. 

Ely W Playlet to A Masscy 

H Lowenhayn toWDGreen 

Hib Sav & Ln Soc to Isaac Eliaser. 
Mary Devlin toAuguste Meyer.... 

JS Rolls toFLTurpin 

C W Randall to W D Addison.... 
A A Levi to A Young 



S Commercial, 4S:5 w Kearny, w 20 x 
511:11 50-vara2S 

E Larkin, 87:0 n McAllister, n 50x87:0- 
W Addition 

W Columbia, lot n 21st, n 26x100, be- 
ing in M B112 

E Devisadero, 02:0 s Bush, 6 25x100— 
W A 458 

N Bush, 112:0 w Pierce, w 25x100, be- 
ing In W A 427 

W Jessie, 129 s 20th street, s 22x75— M 
BlnckoO 

S California, 150:3 w Baker, w 25x1: 7n; 
-W A581 

N Grove, 150 w Broderick, w 50x137:0— 
W A528 



13,000 
5 



1,200 
3,300 
3,000 
1.6S0 
2,2(10 



Thursday, July 3rd 



I T Mordecai et al lo Jacob Beisel. E Mississippi, 175 s Mariposa, s 50xln0 

| PB305 IS-2,210 

W Steiner, 02:5 n Ellis, ne 25xS7:6-W 
Addition385 6,250 

Undivided one-half sw 4th 155 se Mar- 
ket, se 40x195— 100-vara 126 20,500 

Undivided one-half sw 4th, 155 se Mar- 
ket, se 40x195 -100-vara 120 20,500 

S Chestnut, 68:9 e Polk, e 08:9x137:0- 
W A28 1,500 

WT Mission, 147:8 n 24th, n 36:10, w 125, 
s 19:3, e 7:0, 6 10:10, e 117:0 to begin- 
ning 4500 

E Miss on avenue, 100 s 1711:, s 25x105 
— M B70 Gifl 

N Jackson, 225 w Fillmore, w 25X127:8 
-WA319 Gilt 



A E McMillan to G E Bacon 

R S Floyd et al to Trs Soe Cal Pion 

SametoCoraJ Flood 

Odd Pel Sav Bk to Henry Elliott. . 
H Ilollman to Wm Bloomer 

Cornelius Broder to A Maloncy . . . 
Enwin Goellcr to Fanny Goeller.. 



Friday and Saturday, July 4th and 5th. 

Legal Hnlidayi^ 



Monday, July 7th. 
Hib Sav & LnSoclo E Ba7nett.7T 
Arthur F Low lo Geo Edwards.. . 
Geo Edwards to Eliza A Damon.. . 
La Soc Francaise to "Win T Garratt 
Wendell Easton to Alex Warner 



Bridget Keenan to M JO'Brien..., 
Geo Edwurds to Jno H Lindeman 

J Y Wilson et al to E L Goldstein. 
Chas W Randall to J E Townseud. 

Same to fc'redk Schutze 

Timothy Dolan to Cath Kennedy.. 



E Devisadero, 87:0 s Bush, s 25x100 — 

W A45S 

E Shntwell, 155 s 20th, s 40x!0u, being 

in MB50 

EShniwell, 175 s 20th, s 25x100, being 

in M B 56 

Se Bryant, 412:6 sw 4th, sw 137:0x275- 

1110 vara 180 .... 

Undivided one-half ne Ellis and Gough 

e 103:1x120 ; se O'Farrell and Gough, 

e 187:6x120— W A 132 

E Barllett, 235 s 24lh, e 25x117:0, bein 

inMB170 

E 2nd avenue, 241 s 15th street, s 24. 

80:9, n w to a point, w 84:9 to com 

M B 30 

Assignment for the benefit of creil- 

I itors, etc 

S California, 60:3 w Baker, w 50x100 

W A531 

W Baker, 50 n Pine, n 25x100:3, being 

in W A581 

Se Perry. 475 sw 3rd, sw 25x80, being 

in 100-vara 80 



$1,200 

5 

2,800 

19,000 

10 
1,250 

2,850 
1 
2,700 
1,170 
4,350 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 12 : 1884. 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Carroll— July 3d, to the wife of J. P. Carroll, a Bon. 

FiRRAR— In this city, July Gth, to the wife of Captain L. C. Farrar, a daughter. 

Lieb - In this city, July 7th, to the wife of A. H. Lieb, a son. 

Russell— In this city, July 5, to the wife of Captain W. J. Russell, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Andrews-Van FosaoH -July 2, Joshua Andrews to Lucinda Van Fosson. 
FowLER-MAiiAS-July 1, EzraS. Fowler, of Oakland, to Jennie E. Malum, nf this city. 
Krclino-Kradsk— July S, Joseph Kreling to Ernestine Krause, both of this city. 
MAcDouaALt-Hicits— June 28, John C. MacDougall to Kitty Hicks. 
St ne-Ellinoiiouse— Feb. 3, William R. Stone to Emma M. Ellinghouse. 
Williams-Avers— July 8, George J. Williams to Julia M. Ayers. 

TOMB. 

Horj— Jul«3, Dr. Jerome Horn, a native of Germany, aged 48 years and 7 months. 

Jewktt -July 6, Josefa S., wife of Geo. O. Jewett, aged 20 years. 

Johnson- July 8, Josephine Johnson, a native of Sweden, aged 34 years. 

LlCHTBNSTElN— July 7th, Sarah, wife of B. H- Lichtenstein, aged 33 years. 

McCUBKRK July 8, John McCusker, a native of Ireland, aged 52 years. 

i; AS , hs— July 8, Mrs. Charlotte Rasche. aged 71 years, 11 months and 3 days. 

Tqrrbns— July 4, Sarah Torrens, a native of England, aged 54 years. 

Van Zandt— July 5. Maude E. Van Zandt, a native of Philadelphia, aged 33 years. 

WalKBB— July 6, Frederick W, Sana Walker, aged 42 years, 6 months and 4 days. 

Yatks -July 5, Josephine Yates, aged 26 years, 1 month and 25 days. 

BUCKLEY AND HIS METHODS. 

Among the concomitants of a disbanded Congress is the return of 
the servants of the people to the arms of their constituents. What sort of 
a reception will be ace irJed to the delegation from California is one of 
the problems of the near future. It is certain, however, that the Demo- 
cratic bosses and the Democratic masses who repudiated the Congres- 
sional incumbents at the late Convention, will not be found among those 
who will press forward to welcome the returning band. It is no more than 
the truth to say that the local Democracy made an egregious political 
mistake of national importance when they refused to continue in service 
the Congressmen from certain districts. Without condemning or laud- 
inn the behavior of those Congressmen during their brief term or service, 
it is an undeniable blunder to attempt to change the representation of 
this State, by substituting a parcel of local politicians for men of experi- 
ence in national legislation. It seems hardly credible that Mr. Buckley 
can understand what the conditions of Congressional work are. Just at 
the time when these Congressmen are becoming familiar with the ways of 
their position; just when they are acquiring a standing among their fel- 
low members; just when they are entering that class of experienced Con- 
gressmen into whose hands the management of important work is invari- 
ably confided ; just at the time, in fact, when their usefulness to their 
State is on the point of beginning— they are dragged back, their career is 
cut short and so much Congressional training is spent to no purpose. It 
must simply be gone through with a second time. The same course of 
schooling will be necessary for the new members, and meanwhile two 
years are thrown away, to the disadvantage and discredit of the State. 
This policy of capricious political decapitation is already fastening on 
the State a reputation for lack of foresight and political ability. Suc- 
cessful political work demands continuity and experience. *' You Pacific 
coast men," 3aid an old lobbyist at Washington last Winter, "don't 
know how to manage your political affairs. Why do you persist in sending 
fresh bands over here every term ? You will never have an able delegation 
here until you afford them an opportunity to become Congressionally able. 
One swallow does not make a summer, and no more does one term make 
a good Congressman. The square of one is one ; the square of two is 
four; the square of three is nine. Just so a Congressman's power and 
influence in his second term is four-fold what it was in his first ; and in 
his third term it becomes nine-fold." These are words of sagacity 
which our political managers have carefully disregarded. 

A noted humorist tells a story about a gifted but peculiar friend, who, 
in achieving the tusk of reading the dictionary completely through, was 
so unfortunate as to lose the place several times in succession on arriving 
at the letter X. In order to satisfy his sense of accuracy, therefore, that 
he had read absolutely, with no omission, he had determined to begin 
again at the beginning whenever he lost his place; the consequence was 
that he was now at the word "alligator" for the seventh time, never 
having been able to complete the book. Whether or not the political 
managers are as gifted as the friend in question, at least they partake of 
his peculiarity in their system of sending men to Congress. But there is 
a limit to all things. If the Congressional mill continues to rotate at its 
present rate, its material — that is to say, the retinue of political hangers- 
on—) lentiful as it is, must, inevitably become exhausted at no distant 
date; and the managers will be forced, by very dearth of fresh candidates, 
to look with favor on the former standard-bearers. As it is, however, 
they seem to be performing a series of experiment^ in political vivisection, 
in which afresh victim is needed for each experiment; once used, the 
corpses are ignomitiiously discarded. Against this sort of vivisection the 
far-seeing men of all parties, and the friends of honest and able govern- 
ment, have determinedly set their faces. 

The Baldwin Hotel now enjoys, and deserves to enjoy, the reputa- 
tion of being one of the best appointed and most comfortable hostelries on 
the American continent— and that is saying a good deal. It is centrally 
located, and within easy access of all steamboat landings, railroad depots, 
places of amusement, etc. Cars, connecting with all parts of the city, pass 
its doors every moment. Externally it is a magnificent pile of architecture, 
and internally it is laid out with a view to combining grandeur with com- 
fort and convenience. It is gorgeously and luxuriantly fitted up and 
furnished. The attendants, of whom there is a large and carefully 
trained staff in each department, are active, quiet and polite, and look 
after the wants of the guests with a fidelity and alacrity which is ex- 
ceedingly pleasing. The table is kept supplied with every delicacy the 
market affords, and the kitchen is presided over by an artist in the 
culinary line. 

A magnificent assortment of Japanese curiosities and works of art 
is to be seen at G. T. Marsh & Co's., No. 625 Market street. 



LET THE LEPERS LOOSE. 

Five and twenty lepers, 

Let them have a run, 

Away from the pest-house, 

Then ther'll be none. 
Let the lepers loose ! Close the pest-house ! What a superb idea ! It 
would be economical, and economy is always the first object among our 
public bodies. Send the lepers East and exhibit them to raise funds for 
the School Board to pay their swindled teachers. There are probably a 
thousand lepers loose in California to-day, chiefly among the Chinese, 
so why make a fuss about turning twenty-five adrift. They would not 
spread the loathsome disease much more rapidly than it is now being 
disseminated. There would be a few more lepers to manufacture cigars 
and cheap clothes, but what of that. Think of the money that would be 
saved. If expense be any consideration why not ship them to Honolulu. 
Twenty-five more or less among the Hawaiians would be a mere baga- 
telle, and the Hawaiian Government with their thousands of lepers would 
doubtless take our twenty-five at a reduced rate. Here is an idea for 
the Chronicle to work upon. We have received lepers from Hawaii, why 
not return the compliment and ship our off-scourings, one by one, to 
mingle with their fellow-suffering Kanakas ? That any man with the 
least flickering gleam of sanity should propound such a monstrous sug- 
gestion as to let the lepers loose shows that man to be a fit candidate for 
an insane asylum. We need not go far from home to learn what the 
consequences of such a cmrse would be. Fifty years ago leprosy was 
unknown in the Hawaiian Kingdom. The latest official report of the 
Honolulu Board of Health, which is just published, shows that up to 
June, 1882, no less than 2,002 lepers had been sent to the leper settle- 
ment on the island of Molokai. This was an average of 162't cases in 
each year. During the last two years no less than 777 lepers" had been 
taken from their homes, or 388h in each year. These figures show bow 
the disease has increased owing to the carelessness and remissness with 
which it was formerly treated. The expenses of the Board of Health 
amount to ten per cent of the whole revenue of the Hawaiian Kingdom, 
and the President of the Board stated, in his last report, that "at least 
tioo per cent of the entire population are attacked by this fearful and 
supposed incurable malady of an exceptional character, that demands 
separation and isolation." 

Over ninety per cent, of the lepers segregated in the last two years 
were cases of old standing, that ought to have been taken from their 
homes years ago, but who, from being let loose, have been spreading the 
disease amongst their families and friends and swelling the number of 
incipient cases that are now abroad undetected and still unrecognizable in 
the kingdom. Let our lepers loose, and in fifty years, with only our pres- 
ent population, we would have at least 8,000 lepers in the city of San 
Francisco. Then where would be the economy and the results of econ- 
omy ? We should have to spend at least ten per cent, of our revenue in 
stamping out the accursed and incurable plague — this living death, which 
is a thousand times worse than death itself. We think that the facts and 
figures, obtained from official sources, that we have given above, should 
satisfy even the veriest inane idiot that he would be guilty of the most 
outrageous and diabolical crime in turning loose upon the whole commu- 
nity even twenty-five lepers, on any grounds whatever, much less on the 
ground of economy. On the contrary, we would advocate and urge that 
a thorough search be made through Chinatown to discover the existence 
of lepers, and that all and any, whether Chinaman or white man, who 
may be tainted with this scourge, should be immediately and indiscrimi- 
nately removed from any chance of contact with his fellow-man. Spend 
millions of dollars, if needs be, to prevent the propagation of leprosy in 
California, but for no personal or pecuniary reasons must the lepers be 
let loose. 

A Good Thing for California Merchants and Manufacturers. 

— The " Pacific Coast View Album," now being prepared by I. W. Taber, 
the photographer, will be the most attractive advertising medium ever 
produced in San Francisco. It will be a handsome 12x18 volume, each 
page of which is to be illustrated with an 8x10 photograph, either a view 
of California scenery, or of the advertising business house, and in some 
instances, by means of instantaneous photographs, the process of manu- 
facture will be portrayed. The book will be presented to the leading 
hotels of the Pacific Coast, of the chief Eastern cities, and of Sydney and 
Melbourne ; to the Gillig U. S. Exchange, London ; the mail steamers of 
the Pacific Coast, to Australia, China and Japan, and one line of steam- 
ers to Liverpool. The object Mr. Taber has in view is to make this allium 
an unequaled advertising medium for the representative businesses and 
industries of San Francisco, and for the many beautiful health resorts of 
California, and as it will be in places where merchants and the traveling 
public not only " most do congregate," but also have considerable enforced 
idleness, this interesting volume cannot fail to answer its purpose. 

Among the many ingenious contrivances designed for the promotion 
of domestic comfort, the New Monarch Oil Stove for 1S84 takes a leading 
position. This is one of the must exquisitely-constructed and cunvenieut 
cooking apparatuses ever seen. No well-regulated household cvn afford 
to be without it, and ladies should make it their business to call in at 
Messrs. John F. Meyers & Co.'s establishment, No. 869 Market street, 
and examine one. Descriptive circulars will be sent on application. 

Gentlemen who wish to present a graceful, stylish appearance, should 
patronize Messrs. J. M. Litchfield &Co., Military and Merchant Tailors, 
No. 415 Montgomery street. They keep on hand a large stock of rich 
and elegant materials, and employ first-class cutters and workmen. Asa 
natural consequence they can be relied upon to turn out splendid gar- 
ments. Gents' Furnishing Goods, Military Trappings and Society Re- 
galias manufactured and kept on sale. 

Novelties in Cravats, Scarfs, Collars, Shirts, Underwear and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods can always be found in great profusion at J. W. Car- 
many's, No. 25 Kearny street. 

Keep yourself cool during these hot days, and promote good health at 
the same time by going to the Sheltered Cuve Baths, North Beach. CarB 
run right to them. 



Jul} IS, 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



l.t 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 
Guano Tests. Probably there it do bettn DMthod oi dattrmlniiig tlie 
purity of jnuno tlmn the oombaitioD tost, wliioh if* n* foUowi: Poor half 

f the guano Into an Iron ladle, mob •** li oxed Ld outing balleta, 

■ml iiloi-t' it Bpon rod hot oools until nothing but a white or grnvinh aith 
i* U-ii, whtafa most bt mlghod titor cooling. The bostsorti of Peravlan 
guano do n"t yield mora tow nt of ash, while Inferior »»■ 

it igon.nn. Chili, and African gxtano, loan ■ roridut "f 
wii BO par oantu Genuine guano leaves » white or gray ash ; ami 
a retl <>r fallow ash Indicate! the adulteration with earthy matter or sand, 
tta Ian test in 1-aaed upon the fact that the moat important Ingredlente, 
Ha., the oltaf opounda, beoome rolatiliaeoT. and escape when 

nubjected to a sufficient amount of heat. The difference of odor of the 
vapora evolved in the process, according as we are working wit I, 
thin! class guano, must also he noticed. The vapors from the better kinds 
have a pungent inall like spirit* of hartshorn, with a peculiar piquancy 
somewhat reeembUng thai ol rich old deoayaa cheese, while those arising 
from Inferior varieties' smell like singed horn shavings or hair. -London 

A Norwegian speculator has been turning his attentiou recently to 
the introduction of whale meat as an article of fond. He was induced to 
do this through a belief that it was both nutritious and palatable, and 
the knowledge that immense quantities of it are annually thrown away, 
notwithstanding large quantities of it are eateu each season by those en- 
En the whole nahariea, He concluded that if some preserving pro- 
cess were adopted it could be profitably used on shore. He accordingly 
made arrangements with several captains of whaling vessels and two 
: reserving firms, and some time since he gave a whale dinner. At 
this dinner he claims to have proven that whale flesh may be cooked in a 
damn different ways, and that it forma a delicious, as well as a whole- 
some, article of diet. It is said that some parts of the fish supplied ma 
terial for, and excellent imitation of, turtle soup ; other portions resemble 
beef, while other portions, again, are almost as white and tender as 
chicken. — British Trade Journal. 

Electric Lighting at a Dance.— At a dance given by Sir George 
Grove, at Lower Sydenham, the electric light was used to illuminate the 
I various rooms, with great effect. The lamps — twenty Woodhouse and 
Rawson and Swan, 20 candle-power, 42 volts — were fed by a Newton 
compound shunt dynamo, driven by a portable engine placed across the 
I road about 100 yards off, and used during the day for sawing wood. As 
i the honae is already wired for the electric light, all that it was necessary 
to do was to hang the cable over the road and connect on to the house 
1 mains. The rooms were quite cool, and general admiration was expressed 
; at the effect. One of the young ladies present — Miss Chambers— had a 
small tamp imbedded inside some real flowers, the current being supplied 
by an accumulator in the pocket of her dress, and the effect was exceed- 
ingly pretty. — Public Opinion. 

A new coffee, called "Maragogipe," has lately been discovered in 

Brazil, and a Commission was formed to investigate the qualities of the 

coffee, and also of the plant, and they decided entirely in its favor. Not 

only does it produce a larger crop, but the coffee-berry is much larger, 

and possesses a very silky-looking smooth surface, with high quality 

. flavor. It stands well on the high lands, and the first planters that have 

| adopted it in Brazil are so delighted with the results that they are cut- 

I ting down their splendid coffee-trees of the old variety of coffee, and 

| planting this new "Maragogipe " variety. — British Trade Journal. 

Layering a Rose Bush. — A writer in one of our agricultural news- 
papers says that a rose bush may be layered with little trouble, and then 
tells how to do it. Make a narrow trench, three or four inches deep, 
where a good well grown shcot can be bent into it. After blooming in 
June, cut a slit in the &hoot selected at the point where it will touch the 
soil, press some soil into the cut, bend the cane down to the bottom of the 
trench, and fasten it there with some pegs, and cover it well with soil. 
By fall it will be a rooted plant, and can be cut away and transplanted. 

The Guatemalian Government has decided upon the construction of 
a railway from the capital to St. Thomas, a port on the Caribbean sea. 
The estimated coat of the road is 812,000,000. To secure its construction 
the Government has decreed every adult male in the republic a share- 
holder, the cost of the shares being §40 each. In case a man is too poor 
to pay cash down the Government will permit him to pay 84 a year for 
ten years. The Government collects the money and guarantees the pay- 
ment of expenses as rapidly as the road is completed. 

Paper railroad wheels have been experimentally tried on the State 
railways in Germany. They are said to have given every satisfaction— 
indeed, to have exceeded expectations. Some of the wheels have run 
00,000 miles and more before being turned again. It has been found that 
the paper discs are at least equal to wooden discs in point of strength 
and elasticity, that they do not absorb moisture, and that they adapt 
themselves much better to the movements that take place in tires in con- 
sequence of change of temperature. 

Blood Cake for Cattle.— The use of blood as a food for cattle has, it 
is stated, been the subject of experiment in Denmark by a chemist, who, 
as a result has now invented and patented a new kind of cake, in which 
blood forms one of the chief ingredients. This new food is stated to be 
exceedingly nutritious and wholesome, and is eaten with avidity by 
all sorts of animals, and even by cows and horses, which have naturally 
a strong dislike to the smell of blood. 

A Cheap Insect Destroyer.— A correspondent of the Fruit Recorder 
says he has boiled leaves and stems of tomato plants until the juice is all 
extracted, and finds the liquor deadly to caterpillars, lice, and many other 
enemies of vegetation. It does not injure the growth of plants, and its 
odor remains for a long time to disgust insect marauders. 

In England the mails are used for the transmission of nearly every 
species of merchandise. Fish, game, meat, butter, eggs, fruit, cream, 
and all other farm products are transmitted through the English parcels 
post at very cheap rates. In a word, the British Postoffice really does 
the express business of the country. 

Horses troubled with scratches, collar galls or any abrasion of the skin 
can be cured by washing with Boncuti and warm water. 



150 150 150 

THE STANDARD SHIRT, 



si till' II. 





N.B. 
150 

uv\ 

FINE LINEN: 

Is the VERY BEST Quality WHITE SHIRT for 

$1-50. 

Give this Shirt a trial, recommend it to your friends, and promote Horn, 
lacture by asking' for 




150 



150 



150 



THE "POPE HOUSE" HOTEL. 

The Pope House, for fifteen years past the Leading.Private Hotel 

and Boarding-House of Santa Cruz, 

Enjoying the first patronage in the State, has CHANGED HANDS, and 

REOPENED MARCH 25th, 

Under the direct personal management and supervision of the New Proprietors, who 

hope, by close attention to the wants and comfurta of their guests, to merit 

a continuance of the %'aluablc patronage so long enjoyed by Mrs. Pope. 

Private Family Dining. Rooms. French Dinners Served to 

Order, In Best Style. 

^""Special OMNIBUS awaits all arriving and departing trains! and steamers. 

No charge whatever for conveying guests to or from this Hotel. 



KINCSFORD'S OSWECO STARCH 

19 THE 

STRONGEST, PUREST AND BEST, 

AND IS RECOOX1ZED AS 

THE STANDARD ALL 0VEE THE W0BLD. 



FOX INVALIDS, 
KINGSFORD'S CORN STARCH 
IS BIOBLY XECOMMENDED FOX ITS FVXITY AND 
DELICACY. Sept. 30. 

THE /ETNA SPRINGS ARE NOW OPEN. 

To the highly curative properties of these waters and the charms of the place is 
added an Elegant and Oapac'ous SWIMMING-BATH. These waters Purify the 
Blood, Refresh, Renew and Restore the Whole System. They Cure Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, Dyspepsia, Erysipelas, Kidney and Liver Diseases, Chronic Diarrhoea, Par- 
alysis and Pulmonary Complaints, in the early stages. They afford magical relief in 
cases of Nervousness, Sleeplessness and General Debility. 

For Pamphlet, containing Analysis and Cures, address, 

WM. BTJRNELIi. Superintendent, 
Or WM, H. LIDELL, Proprietor, 
Iddell Postoffice, Naps County, Cal. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COR. HALLECK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the businees portion of the city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, 91, £1 25 and $1 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, good for any meals, $5. Hot and Cold Batha, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

ART CLASS WORKS, 

Nos. 1211, 1213 and 1215 Howard St., bet. Eighth aud Ninth. 



JOHN MALLON. 



May 3. 



ALAMEDA. 

g®"jPurcfta«ers can secure some BARGAINS IN IMPROVED 
and TTNIMPXOVED PROPERTY, btj applying to 

I. M. BET -VOIDS, Real Estate Agent, 

[April 5.] Park St., near N. a. E. K , Alameda. Cal. 

AT) Yy T "7 L" Send six cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
I J\1Z> JLj, of goods which will help all, of either eex, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute' V 
sore. At once address True & Co., Augusta, Maine. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1884 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
The cholera plague still continues its ravages in France, but, up 
to last Thursday, it did not seem to be increasing the number of its vic- 
tims to any alarming extent or enlarging the geographical sphere of its 
operation. On that day, however, strong indications of a northward 
movement of the disease, in the direction of Paris, were manifested,- 
and, if it once reaches that great center of population, terrible results 
must ensue. In this connection, by the way, it may be mentioned that 
if the rumor that five cholera patients at Toulon were cured by inhaling 
pure oxygen can be verified then a great stride has been made in medical 
science. It is likely, however, that the rumor will turn out to be one 
of those freaks of imagination which the telegraph wires, or rather those 
who manipulate them, are so frequently guilty of. 

The Franchise Bill has been passed up to the British House of Lords, 
and its consideration has been postponed by that body, by a vote of 205 
to 146, until the bill embodying the re-distribution scheme, by which the 
new franchise is to be put into practical operation, is also sent up for their 
consideration. As a matter of logical argument, this is nonsense ; as a 
political move, it is shrewd beyond the power of language to describe. By 
this simple expedient the Franchise Bill is, for the present, held at bay, 
without any direct conflict between the Lords and Commons being raised. 
In the meantime, the motion of want of confidence in the Government's 
Egyptian policy, with all its great possibilities fur the Conservative party, 
is still pending. Of a verity, the lines of Gladstone and his confreres 
have not fallen in pleasant places. 

The past week has been marked by a great variety of sensational 
rumors regarding events in the Soudan. First, was the statement that a 
thousand Arabs had attacked and captured Debbeh; then, that thirteen 
thousand children of the desert had attacked that place, and been badly 
beaten; then, that General Gordon and Khartoum had been captured, and 
that the lives of all the Europeans had been spared on condition of their 
becoming Mohammedans; then, that Gordan had been murdered by his 
Egyptian soldiers at Khartoum, handed over to the Mahdi. Contradict- 
ory rumors of this kind are unworthy of serious consideration. In fact, 
a suspicion that they were concocted for the purpose of influencing the 
pending debate in the H.>use of Commons on the Governmeut's Egyptian 
policy, not unnaturally suggests itself. Bearing in mind the utter un- 
trustworthiness of all the information we have heretofore had from the 
Soudan, prudence suggests that we believe nothing coming from that 
source now. Even the fall of Berber, which was reported with such dis- 
tinctness of detail, several weeks ago, has never been properly verified. 

The Franco-Chinese difficulty has assumed a very serious look. There 
is now no doubt but that the attack was made, that it was made by Chi- 
nese regulars and that it was inspired and authorized by the Chinese 
Government. The plea in defense put forward by the Chinese officials is 
to the effect that the treaty had not yet been " ratified" by their rulers — 
it was made a couple of months or so ago — and that up to this secret 
process of ratification it had no binding effect; consequently the Chinese 
were justified in resisting the French attempt to take possession, under 
it, of Langson. This is a peculiar doctrine in international law, and the 
French Government does not seem inclined to recognize it, because it has I 
already demanded 250,000,000 francs as an indemity for the outrage. 

At this stage of the matter it is very difficult to predict what the 
outcome of this difficulty will be. There is no lack of indications 
which point to the fact that China acted deliberately with a view to 
promoting a conflict. Thi3 would indicate that some influence must 
have been at work strengthening her back-bone since the treaty was 
made, because China to-day is in no better condition to fight France 
than she was two months ago, and she does not seem to have em- 
ployed the time in improving her warlike condition. These facts all 
strongly support the belief that there is a secret understanding be- 
tween China and Germany and Russia, and that the Mongolians will 
not be friendless in the strife. On the other hand it is rumored that 
France has caropleted a convention by which Portugal agrees to al- 
low her use Macao as the basis of a laud attack upon Canton. 

In the event of a war really breaking out, there are a great variety of 
complications which may arise to confuse matters. The United States, 
Germany and England have large commercial interests in China, and 
these must be very much interfered with by the hostilities. Out of these 
impaired commercial interests a great variety of very nice international 
questions may spring. A dollar's worth of lost trade may readily cause 
two or three outsiders to pull off their coats. 

The action of the judge who tried Lord St. Leonard, the noble young 
blackguard, in passing an absurdly small sentence on the convicted cul- 
prit, and the action of the Home Secretary in remitting a portion of that 
sentence, has no parallel in English history. There was a time when 
even a Prince of Wales was sent to jail for his misdeeds. This is the 
only instance on record where favoritism has been shown in the adminis- 
tration of English justice— and it was not shown to a worthy object. 

A H APPY ASSOCI ATION. 

It bas often been declared that it is is better to be born happy than 
rich, but, as times go, it is even better to be born both happy and rich. 
We have in mind two conspicuous public men in our State who are in 
that condition. Frank Sullivan was a Senator from our city to the last 
Legislature. P. F. Del Valle was also Senator from the progressive 
and beautiful city of Los Angeles. The two men at Sacramento were 
fast friends. They were inseparable. To use a common phrase, it 
looked as if they "slept in the same bed." They thought alike, and 
voted and acted together. The fates have been singularly kind to them. 
They both aspired to go to Congress, and they have, singularly to say, 
been both nominated from districts in which a nomination is equal to an 
election. As in Sacramento, so in Washington, they will be friends and 
allies, working together for the good of the Stats in which they were 
both born. Happy Sullivan ! Enviable Del Valle ! 

Without honesty and good nature, knowledge is superfluous. 



CLUB LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO. -No. 6. 

We have given the clubs a rest for the last few weeks, for the rea- 
son that we knew that our criticisms had not fallen on stony ground, but 
that a discussion was going on, in more than one of them, as to how they 
could best be brought under some sort of control, and made amenable to 
such well-considered rules as prevail in similar institutions elsewhere. We 
learned that they had begun to realize their own weakness. They sprung 
into existence in this city when no man and no set of men cared to be 
subject to anything save his or their own wayward and, too often, lawless 
and unbridled predilections and passions. We know that in certain influ- 
ential quarters it is felt that the sober second thought of these less reck- 
less times should have weight and prevail We know that many goud 
citizens, who like clubs for social and other reasuns, dislike them for their 
drinking and gambling propensities, and because all too many men have, 
in the recent past, found them to be " the road to ruin." That this feel- 
ing is to-day a live and active one is the best justification of what we 
have written. We are glad to know that it is working, and that, like 
leaven, it is bound to influence and expand its surroundings. 

It is a good sign of the times that clubs and society, and a great many 
other things, must get rid of the recklessness and moral-defying propensi- 
ties of looser days, and bring themselves into more active sympathy and 
conformity with the better, higher and nobler aspirations of to-day. We 
are not of those who believe that argonaut life was one of the best things 
in the world. It doubtless had its charms for young and reckless spirits, 
but empty, and, in the end, unsatisfying excitement of the most un- 
healthy kind was all there was to it. We do not think that the newer 
was a better way. We huve not failed to observe that those who trod it 
have almost invariably lost their way in life, and have too frequently fin- 
ished up as wrecks, whose fate nobody envies. No ! There are better 
ways in old beaten paths. Fast life has been tried hereabouts for about 
all it is worth, and whilst no man or woman is better for having adven- 
tured upon it, thousands and tens of thousands are infinitely the worse. 
It is good that this is being realized. It is a happy sign that society is 
insisting upon a better state of affairs. It is well that better life and 
cleanlier living are meeting with an appreciation they did not at one time 
receive. It is above all things good that the clubs are beginning to con- 
sider of their ways and are preparing to set their house in order. 

Just how to do that is the thing that principally troubles them. Here- 
tofore they have been subject to no rule, order or authority. There has 
practically been no qualification or test for membership except the pos- 
session of money wherewith to gamble and drink. Honor, business 
fidelity and good morals cut little or no figure when the admissibility to 
membership came to be considered. The simple question asked was : 
" Is he a good fellow ?" which being literally interpreted meant : " Is he 
able to dine and wine his fellow-members, can he gamble and pay his 
losses, are his morals loose enough to stand what is going on around 
him ?" In other words : " Is be one of us, can he stand the racket, can 
he play and pay and be naughty and wicked and jolly, and hold his 
tongue under all circumstances ?'' If be could submit to these tests he 
was forthwith admitted. If he were a saint from heaven his saintship 
would be the best possible cause for exclusion from our clubs of sinners. 
No wonder that in the better condition of things socially and morally 
that has been dawning upon us for some time that to be a member of a 
club was to be a tattooed individual subject to suspicion, and no wonder 
that the clubs themselves are awakening to a sense that better ways are 
needed and called for. 

How to reach those better ways is now, and will continue for some 
time, to be the problem that will have to be solved by our city clubs. 
We hold to the hope and the faith that the present clubs can be reformed. 
If it were not for that faith and hope, we should say blot them out of ex- 
istence altogether and begin anew with institutions more in accordance 
with the new, improved, happier and more exalted tone and temper of 
the times in which we live. But we recognize, as conservative men, that 
it is easier, as a rule, to reform what exists than to create anew. It is 
simpler to re-model than to re-create. In the present instance this is all 
the truer because the existing clubs, or, at any rate, their leading mem- 
bers, have reached the conclusion that "something must be done." If, 
as we believe, they are honestly intent on finding out what that " some- 
thing "' is, then much has been accomplished and the day of better 
things is near at hand. To realize the necessity for reform is the first 
and most important step toward its accomplishment. Where the will 
exists, the way can be pretty surely found. 

There are men in all the clubs who owe it to themselves, to their fami- 
lies and to progressive public opinion, to reform the institutions with 
which they are connected, or withdraw altogether. They know that is 
an obligation upon them. They feel it in their bones, and that is doubt- 
less why we have had so many men, within the past few weeks, express 
to us quietly their approval of our advocacyin this direction. They know 
we are right. We have had them admit that club life in San Francisco is 
not what it ought to be; that it is, as a rule, loose in its morals; that it 
encourages drinking to excess; that it engenders the gambling spirit; that 
it is fast in its habits and low in its tone, and that it is not what good cit- 
izenship would approve, sound morality justify, or correct life demand. 
All this, and much more, we have had whispered into our ear. Yet the 
difficulty has again and again been presented as to how to reform that 
which already exists. We know it is considerable of a difficulty; that it 
is not absolutely insurmountable we are well persuaded. The greatest 
difficulty has already been overcome. A spirit of reform has been infused, 
and that is more than half the battle. We shall, on another occasion, 
apply ourselves to the task of indicating how desired reforms and 
improvements may be effected. 

Messrs. Raphael Weill & Co., who have succeeded Messrs. J. W. 

Davidson & Co. in the White House, corner of Post and Kearny streets, 
enjoy the advantage of having acquired a magnificent stock of goods 
upon terms which will enable them to sell at sacrificial prices and to cut 
under the entire trade. Those who require anything in the way of dry 
goods should call at this famous establishment aud examine the bargains 
offering. This is an opportunity which but rarely presents itself. 

This is the kind of weather to make one enjoy the Fredericksburg 
Brewing Company's Kaiser Beer. 




NetA 








Vol. 35. 



SAN FBANOISOO, SATURDAY, JULY 19, 1884. 



No. 2. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Klttfpot'trvl 1 

A Trado Krui.t _' i 

Aii<t r.tlUn unit New Zealand Notes.. .. IS ■ 

" Bix" lfl 

Both Odfli .... lu 

OaninJ Pulfla ii» 

Club Life in San FrftncdMO— No. 7 16 

Comments on Foreign AfTaim BO 

; Qeaonlly Known ft 

2 

GainM.ntr 10 

i Victory. i 

Ban Pull Weight in 

May Describe* the Folks at Monterey. .18 , 
My Lore (poetry) S 



Noubllta 17 

Passing Remarks IB 

- Wand 6 

i Loading Stocks, etc 1 

[too] Estate Transactions 17 

Scientific and Useful 8 

Seqatua Bore and Across the Bay.. ..10 

Since You Have Oone (poetry) 13 

s cietj 3 

Sporting 7 

Stocks 1 

Sunbeam* 

Tin' Attempt to Steil Our Redwoods.. .14 

The Jewel of Seville 4 

Town Crier 11 



STOCKS. 

The late general rise along the Comstock line bad a good effect 
while it lasted. It brought back an appearance of life to the street, and 
a remembrance of the good old times. The "leading authority " on an 
evening paper alone felt sad. Unfortunately, in an evil hour he waa 
tempted to back his publicly-expressed opinion with his own coin, and 
fell into the same trap which he has so often baited for others. Since 
then his position has been pitiable in the extreme. The barrier of cau- 
tion, which has protected his journalistic course for years, he foolishly 
cast aside in abject dread of his surroundings, and now he stands before 
the public in the role of a critic who always views his duty to others in a 
self-interested light. 

After months of vigorous denunciation of " wreckers," " pirates," and 
the bear clique generally, we now find our hero hand-in-glove with the 
enemy, doing his best— which now amounts to a mere nothing — to assist 
these men in their nefarious schemes. For our part, we despise turn-coats 
and weak-kneed correspondents who, the moment they get cinched, howl 
with virtuous indignation. , 

The " authority " alludes to "verdant" correspondents, and remarks 
that they got left; but we will venture to say that the most verdant and 
badly left man of the past week or so is the before-mentioned " author- 
ity," who, if he continues bis course as at present, will soon taste the bit- 
ters of an Autumnal, or even a Wintry time. The Spring has been 
somewhat disastrous to our crops, but we have the satisfaction of know- 
ing that we gut back on it in the stock market. A late Spring generally 
makes a poor harvest. The glory has, indeed, departed from Israel. 

Work will be resumed on the 2,800 foot level of Hale & Norcross in a 
few days to explore and define the extent of the new discovery. This 
mine is, without doubt, looking better to-day than it has for years, and 
the only ones who will regret the change are the croakers who are short 
on the market. Of course, in mining, it is impossible to foretell the fu- 
ture with any degree of certainty, but, if there is anything at all in pros- 
pects, we have no hesitation in remarking that Hale & Norcrosa has not 
touched the top notch yet. 

A few shares of Chollar Potosi and Savage are not bad things to have 
in one's pocket, should the late find in Norcross improve. 

The speculative value of North End mines, which sold during the week 
at an advance of over 50 per cent., depend chiefly at present on the result of 
the work which is now going on in Mexican. The formation encountered 
ia most favorable, and improving every day. 

The Alta manipulators are either knaveB or cranks. The condition of 
the mine is such that, were it not for their questionable interference, the 
stock would be quoted at double its present value. Their action during 
the past week would suggest that they propose to worry the public out of 
their stock before they let it rise. They are posted to-day on the ledge 
assays. We know that the drill has been in for some time. People who 
invested on Saturday morning last, on strength of information published 
in the News Letter, had an opportunity to make a nice little turn of 
over SI. 50 per share. We will merely add, this week, that we believe 
the *' end is not yet." 

Bodie quoted at -SI.}. Just as we predicted. Now, then, for the sale 
of the 23,000 shares in office to some outside confederate and a subsequent 
upheaval. What a nice programme stockholders have had presented 
them. The attractive bait of a dollar dividend, to permit a heavy short 
interest, succeeded by a heavy break cauaed by blocks of stock reserved 
for the occasion being hurled upon the market. Result, general panic 
amongst outside holders and a comfortable swelling in the manipulators 
bank account. Although sorry for the stockholders, we think they are 
greatly to blame for this state of affairs. Had they taken our advice, 
and the "bull by the horna," they would hare fared better. Now, many 
of them will lose not only their stock dividend to which they were 
justly entitled but their stock, also. 

We caution people against " bucket shops," and against investing on 
the small margins advertised by some people in the daily papers. The 
proposition is not business like, and consequently unsafe. 

The Tuacarora wildcats, Argenta and Grand Prize, are nominally dead, 
although the managers of the menagerie on Pine street still keep up the 
periodical farce of levying assessments. Only another instance of " the 
ruling passion strong in death." 

London, July 17 — Consuls. 100 9-16d. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE CO. 



f3T OFFICE of thi 
Merchant street, Offla 



FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 



VEROPLANE COMPANY tar Navigating tb< 
hours (mm i I.' 8 p. m. 



(10LD BARS— 920 fine par.— Rekined Silver— 141&15 ft? cent, die- 
"* count. Mexican Dollars, 10@10.J per cent, disc 

t9~ -Exchange on New York, 20a; on London Bankers, 4!i\d. Paris 
sight, 5-12\@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New York, 30c. 

**T" Price of M>ney here, 7@ 10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1J| per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
6 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand good. 

«- Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484@4Sb\ 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND 00V. BONDS. 

San Francisco, July IS, 1HS4, 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Sid. 


Asked 


BONDS, 








:;:, 


40 


Cal, State Bonds, 6's,'57 .... 


— 


— 


BANKS. 






S. F. Citv & Co. B'ds, Os.'SS 


— 


— 


Bank of California (ex div). 


155 


160 


S. F. City 8c Co. B'ds, 7s . . . 


— 


— 


Pacific Bank (ex div) 


125 


— 




— 


— 


First National (ex div).... 


112 


117 




— 


— 


RAILROADS. 






Sacramento City Bonds.... 


— 


— 




3i 


37 




— 


— 


C. P. R. R. Bonds 


110 


111 




— 


— 




80 
01 


86 






65 




— 


— 


N. B. and Mission R. R 


:i» 


961 




z 


— 




95 

911 


99 


Los Angeles Citv Bonds. . , . 
VirVa & Truckee R. R. Bds. 


Geary Street K. R 


971 


— 


— 


Central R. 11. Co 


SO 




Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 


— 


— 




Noui 


Nom. 




— 


— 


Clay Street llillli.lt 


N.ttn. 


Nom. 


Or.R. &N.Co. Bonds,6s (ex c) 


106 


108 




61 


52 




091 


100 


Oakland Gaslight Co 


28 


2*1 




110} 


lsoj 


Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex div) . 


67 


69 


N.Pacific R.R. Bonds 


101 


102 


Califor'a Powder Co 


110 


145 






123 




— 


70 




Atlantic Giant Powder 


50 




142 


147 


Gold and Stock Teleir'h Co. 


— 


Si 






125} 
92 


S.V.W.W.Co's Stock(exdv) 
S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds 


881 
1161 


88} 
110j 




85 


MISCBLLANROUS. 






Pacific Coast S.S. Go's Stock 








95 


120 




141 


150 




38 
471 

m 

5 


42 
49J 
35 
12 
5'} 




61 












INSLRANCR COMPANIES. 


1151 
127 








Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 


Fireman's Fund (ex div) . . 


._ 


California Iron and Steel Co. 


— 


15 




115 


— 



The California Iron and Steel Co. has surprised its friends this week by 
the levy of an assessment of So per share. This, in conjunction with con- 
secutive dividends from January to June, gives rise to much criticism. 
We announce the following dividends, not alluded to in our report of last 
week: California Ina. Co., §3 per share; Fireman's Fund Co., S3 per 
Bhare ; Geary-st. E-. R., 50c. per share; Omnibua R. R., 30c. per share ; 
Oakland R. R., 40c. per share; Oakland G-as Light Co., 20c. per share ; 
Stockton Gas Light Co., 40c. per share; Contra Costa Water Co., 50c. 
per share ; California Powder Co., 51 per share. Spring Valley Water 
Stock is firmly held. San Francisco Gas Light Co. is also difficult to pur- 
chase, but in general there ia very little doin^ in any of these securities. 
A. Baird. 411 Montgomery street. 



The " TIburon."— The new ferry boat of the S. F. & N. P. R. R. made 
her trial trip on Thursday. It was eminently satisfactory in every re- 
spect, and justified all the experts present in declaring her the fastest 
boat on the bay. The up trip from slip at foot of Market street, to Point 
Tiburon, was made in 22 minutes. The engine and boilers were made by 
the Union Iron Works— Prescott, Scot & Co. — whose new works at the 
Potrero rank in appliances and completeness with the best shops in the 
world. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 18, 
1884.— U. 8. Bonds— 3s, 1004; ; 4s, 1204,; 4fcs, 112g. Sterling Exchange, 
484@48G. Western Union, 53A. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@24 ; Burry, 
10@16 ; Pulled, 2S@38 ; Fall Clips, 16@20 ; Burry, 10@14. London, 
July 18.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 7s. 6d.@7s. 9d.j firmly held. 

Spring Valley Election.— The annual election of the Spring Valley 
Water Company was held Wednesday, and the following ticket was 
elected without opposition: Trustees— Charles Webb Howard, Charles 
Mayne, J. D. Fry, Joseph Durbrow, James H. Goodman, George W. 
Beaver, S. C. Bigelow. 

Mr. Charles R. Bnckland, formerly of the Australian and Hawaiian 
press, and latterly connected with San Francisco journalism, has just 
purchased the S. F. Merchant, The Merchant has been a bright and able 
trade paper, and under Mr. Buckland's management it is sure to prove 
successful. 

Registered at the Postotfice at San Francisco, California, as Second-Ciaas Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A^ND 



July 19, 1884. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



If ever a woman deserved to be immortalized it is Mrs. Langtry — 
not or. account of her good looks, which may be discounted any day 
right bere in San Francisco, but by reason of her excessive usefulness to 
newspaper pushers, to whom she has been a fertile source of profit for the 
last — well, I don't know how many years. So long as these gushers con- 
fined themselves to the charms of the lady it was all right ; but I ask, 
in the name of common sense, what has the poor woman done that she 
should be placed in juxtaposition with all the homely girls and worn-out 
old women in the city ? Was it a parody ? Or did the dames pay so 
much a bead ? Or was it a dearth of news that evoked that most ludi- 
crous article from tbe pen of a hard-set reporter, the discription of the 
Mrs. Langtrys of San Francisco ? It was so thin — so very transparent — 
the attempt to palm off .on us the charms of certain ancient dames, that 
I almost took a fit. 

Turning to Ethel, whose perfect face bent over a work she was read- 
ing, looked like a poem set in a Langtry bang, which fell in soft curls 
over a forehead as white as snow, I said : "My dear, why did you 
not offer yourself as one of this extraordinary set of beauties here chron- 
icled ? " "I!" she uttered, laughing merrily, "Why! I should have 
been almost heart-broken had I been included in that list. I happened 
to go to school with those girls," naming about twelve out of the number, 
" and positively I don't think you would find a homelier set of creatures 
beneath the sky." " Now, don't be severe, Ethel ; neither feel uplifted 
because Taber took you life size as a specimen beauty," I said, with Borne 
pretense of asperity, but inwardly thinking of the truth of the pretty 
couplet : 

"Full many a flower is born to blush unseen 
And waste its fragrance on the desert air." 

Yes, it is astonishing how hard a task that man set himself when he 
numbered up some, forty women and girls, all to be judged by Mrs. Lang- 
try's standard. 

Grandmothers were there, silver-headed, and girls in short petticoats, 
whose only charm could possibly lie in the fact that their ma's are mil- 
lionaires. 

Now, absolutely, women are not all fools, or easily gulled into believing 
everything said about them, and those poor ladies who have thus been 
dragged before the eye of the public as professional beauties must nat- 
urally feel awfully disgusted with the parade of charms which are nil. 

But then we have had lots of fun over it— we women — who, reading 
the Langtry's list, find out that Monsieur, the scribbler, must be color- 
blind, since he jumbles up eyes and hair in most unseemly fashion. 

Molly, described as blue-eyed, has one eye blue and the other hazel. 
TCittie, called brown-eyed and fair-skinned, is blue-eyed and bathed in 
creme-de-lis. Therefore this man of gush knoweth not wbat her skin is 
like beneath the cosmetic. One poor lady, set forth as a matron of sur- 
passing attraction, has been dead two years, just like tbe voters who are 
still voting though dead in the flesh and absolutely dust years ago. 

"Say, Silver Pen," said a good-natured, homely little girl, as brown as 
a hazel-nut, " ain't it too funny! They've put me in the beauty list as a 
plump blonde, and I as dark as an Indian. Here is tbe list. Let me 
tell you how many mistakes there are." So we went through and arrived 
at the conclusion that the effusive writer was either color-blind and 
crazy, or else so madly in love with women in general, and a few of those 
jotted down in particular, that he bad written them up as seen through 
the lenses of love. 

If Mr. Reporter had picked out a few of our really pretty girls, and 
compared them with the fashionable English beauty, there had been 
some method in bis madness. As it is, he has placed his batch of lovely 
ones in an equivocal position, for which he ought to be kicked to death 
by lame butterflies; and so, considering it done, I leave him in the death 
throes with a hint not to ridicule the ladies in such a wholesale manner 
again, should he escape the final agony I have wished him. 

Since Mrs. Langtry has made it the fashion to be beautiful, I trust the 
ladies in that list will follow her example in all other things. Each should 
purchase a China boy, dress him up in buttons and make a page of him; 
and be it further enacted that they, like tbe beauty, go about the city 
making handsome purchases, and so filling the hearts of curio-dealers 
with a superfluity of rapture, for has not Mrs. Langtry set the fashion in 
these things, and should not the other half-hundred " Mrs. Langtrys" left 
behind keep up the fashion — i. e., those whose pockets are full? This 
would be in the older ladies' power, and the small girls whose ma's are 
millionaires. 

For my part, I am extremely thankful to Mrs, L., and the rest, for 
giving me a new point. It has evidently become the fashion to be beau- 
tiful; and in pursuance of this, I know many of the young women on the 
Sunday list who have already taken to the Langtry coronal of hair, also 
the pink shade of her bows and drapery; and it would not surprise me if 
in due course they robed themselves as G-alatea, and then, of course, in 
due course the Sunday gusher will file a list of *Pygmalions. 

I see already tbe "Langtry" cloak has appeared — a gorgeous confection 
of black brocade and satin, with gleams of gold bronze lighting up its 
somher hue, and heavy cords and tassels hanging at the back instead of 
the front. A Langtry hat is also among tbe novelties, with 15 feathers 
piled upon its brim— a thing that elegant woman would no more wear 
than she'd fly, and she is certainly too heavy for that style of motion, 
though feathers assist flight, but not in that way. Then the " Langtry " 
glove will cause much disposition to make a little oath, sub rosa, in 
French. (You know, a French oath don't sound half as bad as an Eng- 
lish one). This glove goes clear up to the shoulder, where I should advise 
it being fastened by a pin or a band of elastic iDside. 

Shoes, also, will henceforth be a la Langtry. Each dress must have 
its shoe of the same material, with a little gold scrolling upon the toe. 
We won't copy the Langtry foot, for it is not a pretty foot, and even to 
rival the Lily no one will swap her No. 2 C for No. 5 D. No, we'll say 
of the foot, "O, no, we never mention it." Mrs. L. was very fond of 
green, and lo ! " cabbage " green has become a ruling craze. And a very 
pretty green it is, admirably adapted for Summer wear. Of course there 
are two shades of cabbage ; the one for five cents a head is more strictly 
green, but the ten-cent cabbage is more luminous, having a yellower 
shade. But you may take your choice, ladies, so it be green, emerald tint 



or having a shade of Juno brilliant running through ; only, of all things, 
do not let it be supposed that, though you wear this color, you yourselves 
are green. ' Silver Pen. 

To the Ladles. — Mrs. Lewis is now prepared to do the buying for per- 
sons in the interior, and any order received, either for Toilet, Millinery, 
Upholstery, Furniture, Jewelry, Ready-made Clothing, etc., will be 
promptly, correctly and conscientiously attended to. Strfngers in the 
city will find that by calling at Mrs. Lewis' rooms they will gain much 
valuable information. A commission of fifty cents will be charged for 
attending to small orders amounting to $10 or less, but on orders amount- 
ing to more than S10 no commission is charged. Address Mrs. R. G. 
Lewis, Rooms 28 and 29, Thurlow Block, 126 Kearny street, San Francisco. 



The great clearance sale still continues at the White House, corner 
of Post and Kearny streets, and it will be kept up until all of the splen- 
did stock of goods transferred, at prices far below cost, by J. W. Da- 
vidson & Co., to their successors, Raphael Weill & Co., has been disposed 
of. Every article has been marked down to prices that are perfectly 
astonishing when the quality of the goods is taken into consideration, and 
the lady who fails to obtain a few of these sacrificial bargains will act 
very foolishly. 

If you wish to deal with a firm that can be thoroughly relied upon, go 
to Messrs. J. M. Litchfield & Co., Military and Merchant Tailors, No. 
415 Montgomery street. They keep on hand the very best materials, and 
employ the most skillful cutters and workmen. The garments they turn 
out are always perfect in fit and style. They also manufacture and keep 
on Bale Gents' Furnishing Goods, Military paraphernalia and Society 
fixings. 

Every housewife who wishes to have things convenient and comforta- 
ble around her should obtain one of the New Monarch Oil Stoves for 
1884. It is one of the most economic and useful cooking appliances ever con- 
structed. Ladies should make it their business to call on Messrs. F. 
Meyers & Co., No. 869 Market Btreet, and examine one, or else send for a 
descriptive circular. 

Perfect-Fitting Domestic Paper Fashions, stylish, practical, relia- 
ble; once bought, always used. Send for catalogue to J. W. Evans, 29 
Post St., S. F. Oakland Branch— 1152 Broadway, cor. 13th st. 



If you want anything in the way of Japanese Goods, go to Marsh & 
Co.'e, No. 625 Market street. Twelve years' residence in Japan has given 
them unusual facilities. 

The Picnic Season. — Oak-poisoning is prevented by applying Camel- 
line for the complexion before exposure. 

BETHESDR 

COOLS THE BLOOD. 



Devoid of Strong Salts— Soft and Delicious. 

43- Persons who indulge in vinous and alcoholic stimulants will find it the 
MOST REFRESHING, ENL1VEN1NO and INVIOORATING draught ever provided 
in the Laboratory of Nature. 

L. CAHEN & SON, 

418 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

MILLS SEMINARY. 

THE NEXT TERM OF THIS WELL-KNOWN INSTITUTION 
Opens Wednesday, July an, 1S84, 



For further information addreSB 
[July 5.] 



MRS. C. T. MILLS, 
Mills Seminary P. O., Alameda Co., Cal. 



Miss Traver and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 



AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COONTY, N. Y. 



Numher of pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. 



May 3. 



ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French. German and EngliHb Day and Boarding-School for 
Young Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Term commenced July 17, 1884. Address MME. B. ZEITSKA, 

[July 19.] Principal. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STREET, CORNER FOLK, 

Prof. O. A. Li n si t respectfully announces that bis new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bush street, is now opeu for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office 
Hours, for Terms, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 M-, and 1 to 5 p. M. Feb. 9. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction In Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

Analytical and Consulting Chemist, 360 Fourth street, 
San Francisco. July 7. 



July 19, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



8 



SOCIETY. 



July 17th. 1»M. "What singular weather we are bavins' this soa- 

!■ tin- almost nnlveraaJ remark, and surely July is treating as to ■ 
greats* variety than usual iu that Hue. We hare had some lovely weather 
this month, but the olondy, overcast a kid* at the but week, with the 

prinkles ol rain thrown in at odd times, are neither sppi 
n< -r desired, la tboj might be, hail we not had so much moisture last 
month, 

■v le still dbportkis itself in the country, utd consequently life 
in the »ity is rather tame. Hut lome few of those whose abeenoa from town 
dates hack to early In the Spring, arc already returning, and by the first 

usl 1 sxpsotthe tide will turn thin w»y in earnest. The principal 
t the week in town have been, tir^t. the French celebration on Mon- 
day last, the entire Freiu h population entering into the spirit of the affair 
with hearty Rood will which is so characteristic of that nation. The Grand 
Opera Sons was crammed to overflowing iu the afternoon, ami another 
jam was in attendance at Woodward's hardens iu the evening. Secondly, 
the annual muster, inspection and parade of our citizen soldiery at the 
Pavilion, and, thirdly, the chess tournament, which is now going on, and 
in which our Local chess champion, Mr. .1. 1). Redding, is greatly distin- 
guishing himself. 

Apropos of military affairs. I see that Judge McKinstr>'s son Charlie 
has just received an appointment to West Point. It is often said that 

the only way one can mark the progress of time iu California is by the 
growth of the children, and it seems to me only yesterday that the above 
Darned young gentleman was an infant in arms. Truly Time does march 
with almost giant strides, and yet now imperceptihly he steals away! 

A very pleasant little dance was given at Angel Island on Saturday 
afternoon, which was attended by a number of our beaux and those of 
our belles who happen to be in town. The entertainment last night at 
Saucelito, given in aid of the Rectory fund at the Pacific Yacht Club 
house, was eminently successful, and drew a large and fashionable audi- 
dienoe. Speaking of Baucelito, nearly all the yachts have now returned 
from Santa Cruz, and I understand that a number of dances are in con- 
templation at both club-bouses, as well as some yachting excursions on 
the hay— a species of pastime which is always highly enjoyed and very 
popular with the fair sex - . 

The wedding of Mr. Walter GU more to Mrs. Broughton, of Plaeer- 
ville, which took place last week, was somewhat of a surprise to many 
of his acquaintances, as it was generally supposed that the widow of his 
ohoioe resided in San Francisco, and not in the interior. The happy 
pair have already received numerous congratulations, and the lady will 
be an acquisition to our society next Winter. The next event of that 
description that we may look for, will be the wedding of Miss Lou Dear- 
borne and Mr. Nichols, and Mrs. Aiosworth has already arrived from 
Arizona to be present at the ceremony. Then will follow that of Miss 
Lillie Harrison and Lieutenant Knapp, and next month Miss Susie 
Blair and Lieuteuaut Glennon will be united in the holy bonds of wedlock. 
From all that I hear, there is little doubt that wedding receptions will 
form a large proportion of next season's entertainment, and that before 
this season ends the number of engagements announced will equal, if not 
exceed, those of the celebrated season of 'S3. In this connection I may 
as well mention that the lately-wedded pair, Mr. and Mrs. Hinckley, 
have departed for their future home in Nevada. 

Among those who have already returned to town are the Payots, the 
Bokers from Blythedale, the Nuttalls from Lake Tahoe, the Kittles from 
Paso Robles, in time to see Miss Bessie off for Portland, where she will 
make a visit of several weeks. Dr. and Mrs. Burgess are expected home 
from their Eastern trip next week, and the week following Mrs. New- 
hall, her son, and her niece, Miss Palache, are looked for on their return 
from Europe. Miss Hattie Crocker will be due next month, and Mrs. 
Crocker has it in contemplation to go East, meet her, and return with 
her and the D. O. Mills party, who are expected at the same time. Rev. 
0. D. Harrows and family arrived on the overland train this morning 
from the East, where the revereud gentleman has been passing his vaca- 
tion. A number ol the members of the Democratic Convention — Messrs. 
David McClure. Carr, Cannavan, Tully, etc. — also returned this morn- 
ing, and to-morrow's train will bring Mr. Stuart Taylor. Ned Steele, of 
the house of C. A. Low & Co., arrived yesterday, accompanied by his 
wife. They have made quite a long visit to the other side of the continent. 

The Gwins have been entertaining a succession of visitors "up at the 
ranch," as has also Mrs. E. B. Crocker, at her lovely Idlewild on Lake 
Tahoe. Captain and Mrs. Floyd have taken a party of their friends for 
a " Camp " at Mt. Shasta. Camping parties have been very popular this 
year, and the number of them are each year decidedly on the increase. 
There is a freedom and easiness about that mode of life particularly tak- 
ing to '* city folks " in thus being able for a time to so completely throw 
off the forms and ceremonies that trammel one in town. 

Mrs. Cassin and family have gone to their country residence iu Ala- 
meda for the Summer months, and consequently will not receive at their 
residence on Golden Gate avenue. Felix. 



Pacific Congress Springs. ---This delightful Summer resort has been 
thoroughly renovated throughout, and is now open to the public. There 
is no more pleasant place to spend a few weeks than this, and Mr. W. 
H. Stedman does his utmost to make his guests comfortable and at home. 
There is excellent trout fishing to be had in the immediate vicinity, and 
pleasant picnic parties are constantly being gotten up. The water from 
the springs has so many healthful qualities, aud is so well known here, 
that comment from us is needless. Rooms can be secured by addressing 
W. H. Steadman, Saratoga, California. Stages connect at Los Gatoa 
with 8:30 A. M. and 2:30 P. m. trains, S. P. C. R. R. Through fare, §2 50. 



Hon. James G. Blaine, the Republican candidate for the Presidency, 
is one of the many celebrities of national fame who have chosen Knabe 
Pianos. The Plumed Knight selected a cabinet grand rosewood upright. 
President Arthur purchased a Knabe Grand for the White House not 
long since. The Knabe pianos should thus play an important part in re- 
storing harmony among the factiuns of the grand old party. A. L. Ban- 
croft & Co, are the Pacific Coast agents for these famous instruments. 



BEAUTIES. 

Several of our well-known mei have called at our office. 

the week, to know why we have not blazoned forth to the 
the manifold charms of the men of 'Prisoo, We offered la excuse I 

BUbjeot was tOO Vast for OB, and would OOVOr tOO much ground. I 

wee met with the request that but a picked lot shonli n upon 

whom to expatiate for the benefit of those of our readers who, dwelling iu 
London, Paris or New York, may thus have some idea of the b 
of California- -in the male line (ancient and modern), neither the Panama. 
Australian, China or Oregon, simply 'Frisco's own male, u 

to beat, the world over. The task of selection was too delicate for us, ho 

we decided upon sending a -V. L, reporter to interview ii leading 
whose acquaintance among our beaux is of the most pronounced and ex- 
trusive order. Esteeming her a tip-top judge, we have unhesitatingly 
adopted her ideas of some of our handsome men, Jimmy O'NeUfi 
visit among us having brought the article into vogue. Should any of our 
friends whose names do not appear in the subjoined list feel aggrieved at 
the omission, we can only say these are not all. A fresh invoice will be 
given next week : 

•T. D. Walker— A brunette of the most pronounced type. Dark com- 
plexion, shaded by heavy ink-black whiskers; dark eyes, rather deep set, 
and a general air of cheerfulness quite irresistible. 

Willie Howard— A decided blonde of the heavy order of architecture. 
Large, well developed figure; a round, full face; small blue eyes, which 
he usually keeps half closed; colorless eyelashes and eyebrows, a slight 
mustache and a round, fat chin. Makes a good after-dinner speech, and 
excels in the " hop," in which he displays unwonted agility. 

Joseph Donahoe — A strawberry blonde, the hue extending over his 
whole countenance; a round, good-natured, clean-shaved face, bright blue 
eyes; but his general air of reserve tends to check any confidences one 
miudit feel inclined to impart. 

Willie Garnett — A brunette of the nil admirari class. Sleepy eyes, a 
la Gottschalk ; a pinky white complexion and a perpetually caressed 
dark mustache, which, if let alone, would in time attain moderate pro- 
portions. Slim figure and windmill style of walk. Affects the musical 
critic, and is noted principally for his knowledge of operatic affairs and 
singers. 

Jack Parrott— A brunette of the Anglomaniac type, his general ap- 
pearance being nothing if not English, and if he could be induced to 
wear clothes a little tighter, would be looked upon as King of the Dudes. 

David Porter— A blonde of the massive order of build. Bright blue 
eyes, which twinkle merrily at a good story, clean shaved, full, round 
face, clear complexion, straight nose, slight tinge of the Scotch dialect in 
speech, tall, well built and inclining to corpulency. 

Louis Hagtrin — A decided brunette of the grand, gloomy and peculiar 
school. Rather thin face, black whiskers, deep set black eyes and thick 
black hair, slight figure under the medium hight, and affects the esthetic 
in both conversation and dress. 

Harry Tevis — A blonde of the heavy type, a love of a mustache, 
rather sentimental blue eyes, a straight nose and tall figure, which al- 
ready shows indications of approaching stoutness. Has the poets at his 
fingers ends, and is nothing if not imaginative. 

Judge Hoffman — A demi-blonde. A long, thin face, clean shaved, his 
under lip decidedly protruding, penetrating irray eyes and a Roman nose. 
In figure he is tall and trimly built ; is noted for the brevity of his speech 
and the pointlessness of his stories whenever he can be induced — which is 
seldom — to tell one. 

Ed. Greenaway— A demi-blonde of the jovial school. Around, fat face, 
high forehead, dimpled chin, waxed mustache — when on dress parade — a 
pair of laughing eyes, a rolling gait, and a good fellow generally. Affects 
the amateur actor, and has evidently patterned his stage-walk after John 
McCullough's. 

William Matthews— A demi-brunette. Wears his hair cut close ; a 
dark mustache, which is tenderly cared for; blue eyes, clear cut features. 
Walks with a short, quick step, never wears gloves, and couldn't be in- 
duced to appear in a well-fitting boot or shoe. 

Walter Gilmore— A decided brunette. A rather long face fringed with 
well-cared-for, black whiskers; dark eyes, Roman nose, and a general 
luok-at-me air discoverable whene'er he takes his walks abroad. 

Ned Sheldon — A demi brunette of the sentimental order. Sleepy eyes, 
rather obstinate hair, well cared for, dark mustache, which covers a ruse- 
bud month — so say the girls — rather good figure, a little above the medi- 
um hight. Is nothing if not graceful, affects the role of Admirable Crich- 
ton. and is invaluable in a ballroom. 

Nicholas Luning — A demi-brunette, approaching the silver gray. A 
fleshy, heavily-built figure, a round, fat face, covered with a close-cut gray 
beard; small, blue, piggish eyes, which emit gleams of heartfelt delight 
when bestowing charity of any description, whole-souled generosity being 
his failing. A pompous strut and purity of speech are his chief charac- 
teristics. 

George Crocker — A decided strawberry blonde. Round, full face; 
bristly hair and mustache to match ; blue eyes, generally half closed; a 
short, thick-set figure, and death on Lawn Tennis and light suits at 
Monterey. 

Monte Wilson— A demi-blonde of the energetic class. A stout, rather 
under-sized figure ; round, fat face, adorned with a love of a mustache; 
small, twinkling blue eyes, and a slightly pug nose. Muchly affects the 
waltz, but prefers the slow aud Btately movement to the hop. 

William Sharon — A demi-blonde. Sharp, piercing, blue eyes, clear-cut 
features, olive complexion, and a slight mustache ; trimly built, rather 
spare figure, which is about the medium hight. Is noted for the plain- 
ness of his language, having never been known, under any circumstances, 
to make a poetical quotation. 

Hyde Bowie — A decided brunette. Large, black eyes, which he uses 
with effect on school girls ; inky black whiskers ; complexion to correspond, 
and medium in stature. A slow, lazy walker, and affects the nautical 
in his language, except when on the shore. 

Fred Sharon — Is what might be called a natty little fellow. Is a 
blonde of the purest ray serene ; decidedly high forehead ; bright, happy- 
looking blue eyes ; a duck of a mustache, which does not conceal a row 
of passable teeth ; is under the medium size, and inclines to embonpoint. 
[To be Continued.] 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER % AND 



July 19, 1884. 



A KISS. 

[bt lee c. habby.] 

The moon had crept a-down the western skies, 
The mocking-bird trilled low a trembling note 
Of limpid sweetness from his swelling throat ; 

I turned and looked within her deep, dark eyeB — 
Looked long — until her heart sent up a Bush 
That dyed her pale cheek with a crimson blush. 

I prisoned in my palm her finger tips, 

While close I drew her rounded, yielding form, 
That thrilled my being in its contact warm — 

Then bent — and told my love upon her lips! 

— Chicago Current. 

HIS FIRST VICTORY. 

The following, from the Wasp, relates an incident worth recording. 
It refers to General McDowell when in command of this Department, 
with headquarters at the Presidio: 

The Presidio reservation embraces many hundreds of acres, and there 
were, of course, trespassers and squatters. They were gradually got rid 
of, however, by dint of coaxing and intimidation — all except one. That 
one was a gentleman from Ireland. He had erected, away back in pioneer 
days, a flimsy wooden structure, and he lived in it. Persuasion was 
wasted upon him. He distinctly refused either to sell or to vacate. The 
idea that he was trampling upon the dignity of the United States ap- 
peared to give him no uneasiness. The question of his removal by force 
was the subject of official correspondence with Washington authorities. 
Finally a decision was reached. ODe pleasant moonlit night, when the 
Irishman, as usual, had strolled off to spend the firat half of the night in 
getting completely drunk, the stratagem of forcible removal was resorted 
to. Regular soldiers surrounded the shanty and removed it bodily quite 
beyond the boundaries of the Presidio grounds. Along toward morning 
the Irish gentleman returned, by a devious and sinuous route, to the place 
where his castle had stood. It had disappeared as if by magic! If he 
had been drinking anything but San Francisco whisky the shock of find- 
ing only the desolate and blank sand, instead of bis household gods, 
would have sobered him. As it was, be took a pull at the flask that his 
friend Tim had given him to see him home safe, and then, with renewed 
light in his eyes, he took up the trail aud followed it until he arrived at 
the door of his wandering house. After having satisfied himself that the 
regular army was not concealed inside, he entered and betook himself to 
slumber. 

The next morning, arrayed in his best attire, and wearing a tile of most 
wonderful design and proportions, the Irish General appeared on parade 
at the Presidio. General McDowell was directing movements, and was 
surrounded by his officers. He was presently surrounded by the Irish- 
man also, who planted himself in front of him and respectfully touched 
his abnormal hat-brim. The General knew him, and, deliberately turn- 
ing on his heel, gave him the full front view of his back. Nothing 
daunted, the Irishman made a flank movement, and again confronted the 
commander with the remark: 

" Gineral McDowell, I shaluted you, sir." 

Again McDowell turned his august back to the apparition, and the of- 
ficers in attendance began to think of summoning the guard, but, without 
loss of time, the Irishman was once more squarely face to face with the 
General, and said to him: 

" Gineral, I paid my rispicts to you, sir." 

The old General was fairly brought to bay. With a gesture of chilling 
contempt, he said sternly: 

"Well, sir, what do you want? " 

" Gineral," said the Irishman, removing his astonishing hat, and bow- 
ing, " I want to congratulate you, sir, on your first victory. Good morn- 
in,' Gineral !" 

THE JEWELL OF SEVILLE. 

The first thing which the visitor will probably go to see in Seville is 
the famous Giralda. It is the pride of the city, and for good reasons. 
To begin with, it is the most beautiful and the largest specimen of Ori- 
ental architecture of its kind ; and then it is one of the instances of res- 
toration and addition to an ancient building which have added to its art- 
istic value. Originally it was the minaret of the mosque built by the 
" Miramamolin " Abu Jus*if Yacub in the twelfth century. When the 
mosque was swept away, to be replaced by the magnificent cathedral, it 
was preserved. The members of the chapter, who resolved to build a 
church, " such and so good that it never should have its equal," bad the 
good taste to understand that they would promote their own object by 
preserving this masterpiece of Oriental art. The cathedral itself, which 
is not unworthy of the noble ambition of its founders, belongs to the end 
of the fifteenth century and beginning of the sixteenth. The Giralda 
does not stand alone as a survivor of the Mohammedan minarets. The 
towers of several churches originally served the same purpose, but none 
of them are built on so great a scale or ornamented in so elaborate a fash- 
ion. Its proportions alone are magnificent. The tower, built by the or- 
der of Abu Jusuf, is 50 feet square, and 250 feet high. It is ornamented 
with different patterns (ajaracas) on each face. In the sixteenth century 
it was largely painted in fresco by Luis de Vargas, the painter of the 
Puerta del Perdon. His handiwork has been equally badly used by time 
and the modern restorer. Don Pascual Gayangos says that " on the sum- 
mit were placed four brazen balls {manzanas, apples), so large, we are in- 
formed, that in order to get them into the building it was necessary to re- 
move the keystone of a door, called "The Gate of the Muezzins," from 
the mosque to the interior of the tower ; that the iron bar which sup- 
ported them weighed about ten hundred weight ; and that the whole was 
cast by a celebrated alchymist, a native of Sicily, named Abu Leyth, at 
the cost of £30,000." These gigantic apples were thrown down in an 
earthquake in 1305, a hundred and fifty-seven years after the Christian 
conquest, and were not replaced. Don Pascual also gives the name of the 
Arab architect. He was one Jaber, erroneously supposed to be the in- 
ventor of algebra. That, it seems, he was not; but he can dispense with 
the glory, for the Giralda is at least the more beautiful of the two in- 
ventions.. — Magazine of Art. 

R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



BANKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 8 1,7 :*!>,. 
000, with power to increase to 810,000,000. Reserve Fund, §250,000. Southeast 
corner California and Sansome streets. Head Office — 28 Comhill, London. 
Branches— Portland, Oregon; Victoria and New Westminster, British Columbia. 

rhis Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all partsof 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada — Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotlaud— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and New Zealand 
— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
and Australian Chartered Bauk. 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALTOBD President. 

THOMAS BROWN, Cashier I B. MURRAY, Jr., Ass't Casnier 

Aobnts : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank, 
Chicago, UniGQ National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, * 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior TownB of the Pacifi Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, Cincinnati, 
Port'and, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 81,500,000, Gold. President, Daniel Cal- 
lag-uan. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Directors. — D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, Isaac Wormser, James 
Phelan, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen, James H. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— London: Bank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received Bubject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chh.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 2S. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, $2,100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad Btreet. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers—Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E, Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets, 

London Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Sel- 
igman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, IGN. STEINBART, Managers. 
P. N. Lilibnthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF ^AN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 
Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
e lers' Credits. Nov. 8. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July, 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert F. Bunker ( v ice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Easton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. C. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux [July 12.] Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

Oharles Orocker, R, 0. "Wool-worth, Wm. H. Orocker. 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 

332 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

Clarry on a General Banking- Bnsiness. Correspondents 
J in the principal cities of the Eastern S tates and in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL,, »300,000. 

O dicers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and L.eihbank,No.526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTT1G. Board of Directors. — L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Peter Spreckels, A. E. Heeht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. May lb. 



July 19, 1884. 



t'AUKORNIA AUVKRT1SER 



ft 



FACTS NOT GENERALLY KNOWN. 
Benjamin F. Butler vu in 1843 I .m igant for u inliow, Mi-- 
HUdrilb. Hi- ntobttd carefully tin- ii^.ir anil law that n" mao paid 
tviet to R*t itit-> the Rbow, Butler ttfu'rwanfa warrietl Mwa Hildrith. 
Suk-v. ti- ■ balladist with the 

I U-II Minstrtls. ' lit* wat known then a* Ueorfje JoliaiL 
I'd, id hmi.l M.Luircti), druVQ a staye in 

i „'. Pa, II*' WAM tint with it Ic.trnett pik r ibow, then appeared as a 
-ni danoa man. Be i".<k the name «( Rice from " Daddy 
the original "Jim Crow," now a hopeleiw case of "a played out 
•i tot. 

The timi wan that ever aanv a negro s.mwr on the stage was an actor 
named Herbart> Hewai oafled "Pol i<i<- Herbert," from the fact that 
in early lift* he had been a conk and was tinted for his cooking a put-pie. 
Herbert Ntt En a chair before t lie curtain. He painted his face with black 
paint, burnt oork being then unknown. 

Thfl rir*t bend '>f minetrele ever formed consisted of four persons : Dan 
ECmmett, Wm, l'ell, Frank Brower and Wm. Whitloek. All dead but 
limiiiett. They performed in New York in 1S42. 

The tint circus in the United State* showed at Xewberry port, Mass., 
May .'» I. 1812. The manners were Italians, Cayetano & Co. Purdy 
Brown was the next, 1 >■_'*>. 

The first steel |>en was made in 1>;>o. 

The first lucifer match made in 17'.tS, Enpland. 

The first horse railroad was made in 1826 7. 

Coaches were first used in England in 1669. 

The first baloon ascension was made in 17'J8, France. 

The first telescope used in England was in 1608. 

The first almanac printed was by George Von Furbaoh, 1460, Germany. 

The first article ever extensively advertised was "'Rowland's Macas- 
sar Oil " Then "Day & Martin's Blacking." 

The first printing press in this country was in 1620. 

<;Uss windows were first used in England in the eighth century. 

The first entire Hebrew Bible was printed in 1488 

Omnibuses were first introduced in N'ew York in 1830. 

Shakespeare, Byron, Milton, Dickens, Bulwer and Boucicault were 
separated or divorced from their wives. Washington Irving did not have 
any trouble with his wife — he never had one. 

Watches were first made in Nuremburg, 1477. 

The first use of a locomotive in this country was in 1820. 

The first Union flag was unfurled on the 1st of January, 1776, over 
the camp at Cambri^e. Mass. It had 13 stripes of white aud blue, 
and retained the English cross in the corner. 

The first telegraphic instrument successfully operated was by S. F. 
B. Morse. 1833, though its utility was not demonstrated until 1842. 

The first attempt to manufacture pins in this couutry was in 1812. 

When Captain Cooke first visited Tahiti, the natives were using nails 
made of wood, shells, bone and stone. When they saw iron nails*they 
fancied them to be shoots of wood, and, desirous of securing such a valu- 
able ciiuimodity, they planted them in their gardens. 

The first coach used in Scotland was brought from France in 1561. It 
was used by <Jueeu Mary. It belonged to Lord Seyton. 

The first daily newspaper appeared in 1702. 

The first newspaper printed in the United States was printed in Boston 
September 25, 17D0. 

The first complete sewing machine was patented by E. Howe, Jr., 1846. 

It is a singular fact that nearly all of our national airs were composed, 
arranged and put before the public by actors, "Star Spangled Banner," 
words by Key, arranged to music by Ferdinand Durang, ar> actor ; 
" Home, Sweet Home," words by John Howard Pajne, an actor, music 
arranged by Sir Henry Bishop ; " Dixie," words and music by Dan Em- 
mett, a negro minstrel; ** Hail Columbia," words by Hopkins, music, and 
Hist sang by Fox, an actor; "The Bonnie Blue Flag," words and music 
by Harry Macarthy, an actor; " The Suwanee River," words and music 
by Foster, first sanu r by E P. Christy, negro minstrel; " Hunters of Ken- 
tucky," words by Woodworth, first sung by N. M. Ludlow, an actor. 

The bitterest words that were ever written about women were by a 
woman — Lady Jane Montague. She wrote: " I have one consolation in 
being a woman — that is, I can never be unfortunate enough to have to 
marry one." 

In 17D7 wooden clocks began to be made by machinery. This ushered 
in cheap clocks. 

In 1840 the first experiments in photography were made by Daguerre, 
a Frenchman. 

The first express business was started in 1840 by Harden. Adams soon 
followed. Both of Boston. 

In 18.3 the streets of London were first lighted with gas. 

The first successful method of making vulcanized India rubber was 
patented in 1839. 

The first steamers which made regular trips across the Atlantic were 
the Sirius and the Great Western, 18^0. 

The first regular company of players that ever appeared in this country 
gave their initial performance in Williamsburg, Va., in 1752. They 
presented the Merchant of Venice and the farce of Lethe. 

Levi North was the first man that ever threw a summersault on horse- 
back. 

"God Save the Queen" was originally "God Save the King." It was 
written in honor of Louis XIV. of France, but Handel brought it to 
England and dedicated it to George III. Well might Voltaire remark 
" What is originality but judicious plagiarism ?" 

A few years ago Theodore Thomas' agent arrived in a town in Iowa to 
advertise the coming of this celebrated musician and his famous band. The 
avaunt courier called upon the editor of the principal newspaper of the 
town, and after giving him " an ad," requested the editor to notice the 
band as kindly as he thought proper. He then asked the editor how he 
thought they would do in the city. " Well," said the editor, "I don't 
know anything about Mr. Thomas or his band, but I can tell you one 
thing, sure ; that is, if you have not got two good end men the bdow 
wont draw worth a cent in this place." 

The United States has produced the tallest man that ever lived — James 
Porter of Kentucky — 7 feet 8 inches and a half high, aud the smallest 
child that ever walked — Charles Stratton — "Tom Thumb." 
[Continued in next issue.] 



Janus O'Neill and Bobby Nowoomb.— \ few day* ago, Jamea 
O'Neill, wearied with a long p.. ruble, dropped Into the ooey parl<T mIood 
of Sam Sample's, mm Montgomery etreet, t<» take a little Decennary re 
freabment, in company with bli manager, Nil- B iberta, Soaroely bad 
they preyed their jjans, ■* t,, their lips when in caniu Bobby New. mi'ib. A 
new order iel Sample at work, and be done his mixing with a will, for be 
fully enjoyed the jokes and witty conversation that aJwaya followi the 
I of such kindred apirita, AJter a Fen friendly " rootlet," fun and 
laughter were in order. O'Nettl aaked Bobby how he waa getting along 
in the Golden State. " Why," said Newcomb, " I am Hat broke. I am 
stranded, and know of no way to get back to New York bat to walk." 
" What would you say. Bobby, n aaked O'Neill, "if I should bay you a 
ticket for the Empire < fity ! " " What would I say ! " exclaimed the song 
and dance man, "why, I would say, in the language of Monte Criato, 
1 the world it mine.' At the same time Bobby threw himself into a heroic 
attitude. The pleasant party soon passed into the street, and a ticket 
was procured for that " Mecca " of all professionals, New York, and 
Bobby went on his way rejoicing that he did not have to walk. 



Now that tho cable-road is in perfect running ordt*r, the Telegraph 
Hill Observatory is proving to be one of the most fashionable resorts in 
the city. In addition to the magnificent advantages of vision which its 
comtuanding bight affords, there is also the attraction of a delightful en- 
tertainment, musical and otherwise. Choice refreshments are served at 
ordinary prices. 

Poison Oak.- A positive preventive and cure is found only in 
Dickey's Famous Creme de Lis. It also removes Tan, Sunburn and 
Freckles. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine Krug 
Champagne from Keims, France. Beware of California and other coun- 
terfeits. 



MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

TIil- undersigned, having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 
for the Bale of the manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck, all Numbers ; 
Hydraulic, all Numbers ; 
Draper and 'Wagon Duck, 

From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, aud a complete assortment of All 0,ualitie, 
28j-Ineh DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 15 ozs. inclusive. 

MURPHY. GRANT & CO. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO., 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS. 

Agents for RICOKD'S RESTORATIVE PULLS, 

035 Market Street Sail Francisco, Cal. 

PALACE BOTE!,. June 24. 



A CARD. 

To Merchants, Storekeepers, Captains, etc. 

ISIDOR BRAUN, 

Broker in Pearls and Preoious Stones, 
44 HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, 

ENGLAND. 

f^- Consignments of PEARLS and PRECIOUS 

STONES will receive my BEST ATTENTION, and 

ACCOUNT SALES, with PROCEEDS, promptly 

remitted. May 3. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

Incorporated November 24th, IStsi), — Adolph C. Weber, 
President; Ernst Brand, Secretary. Loans at Low Rates. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tbe Oerman Savluscs ami Loau Aociety.-For (be hair*year 
ending June 30th, 1884, the Board of Directors of THE GERMAN SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY lias declared a Dividend on term deposits at the rate of four 
and thirty-two one-hundredths (4 32-100) per cent, per annum, and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 0-10) per cent, per annum, and pay- 
able on and after the 1st day of July, 1884. By order. 
[June 21.] GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savlng:*i aud Loan Society. 619 Clay street. (Incorporated 
July 23, 1857.)— For the six months ending June 30, 1384, the Board of Directors 
declared a dividend on all deposits at the rate of four and thirty-three and one- 
third (4 33A-100) percent per annum, free of taxes, payable on aud after July 1, 1S84. 
[June 28.] CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loau Society, Northwest cor* 
ncr Powell and Eddy streets —For the half year endintr June 30, 1884, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of four and one-half (4J) per cent, per annum on 
term deposits, and three aud seventy-five one-hutidredths (3 75-100) per cent, per 
annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1884. 
By order. VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Franeiaco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 5U5TD 



July 19, 1884 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

" We Obey no Wand bat Pleasure's."— Tom Moore, 

The average English adaptation of a French Opera Bouffe is a 
work of supreme idiocy. The translation robs the libretto of its signifi- 
cance, and leaves it a sorry bit of dense stupidity. If the adapter at- 
temps to retain the fun and spice of the French, his work becomes simply 
nasty. The English language is not suited to delicate innuendo or witty 
double entendre. It cannot reproduce the finesse of French humor, and 
suggestiveness becomes grossness. The only thing left the adapter is to 
broaden the action in a burlesque sense, and to substitute so-called Eng- 
lish wit — which is simply atrocious punning and misapplied slang — for the 
characteristic humor of the dialogue. In his adaptation of Orpheus, Max 
Freeman has not been able to do any better than any one else, as far as 
dialogue is concerned, and his libretto is, per se, emphatically without 
wit, point or significance, but wherein he has proven himself head and 
shoulders above other adapters is in the preservation of the true spirit of the 
French original, indicated by the action of the performance. This is per- 
haps more a question of stage management than of adaptation, but as the 
stage-manager and adapter are one and the same person there is no divi- 
sion, of credit due. When Orpheus was first produced, a little less than 
thirty years ago, it did not meet with immediate success. The age had 
not reached the phase of iconoclasm that makes of any and every subject, 
from the most sublime down to the most humble, food for ridicule and 
satire, and the French critics found great fault with Offenbach's collabor- 
ateurs for profaning the Olympus, and with Offenbach himself for setting 
the gods to such frivolous, if sparkling, music. But the audacity of the bur- 
lesque and the charm soon asserted themselves, and the foundation of French 
Opera Bouffe wassecurely laid. I consider Orpheusto be pure burlesque. To 
bring gods and goddesses down to our common level, and to mix with the 
attributes with which we have endowed these immortals the frailties of 
poor humanity, is a triumph of humorous incongruity. The French 
libretto teems with flashes of wit, emphasizing this humorous contrast, 
and the lines of every god and goddess are distinctly characteristic in that 
respect. This, of course, does not exist in the present adaptation, but the 
spirit of the idea is, I repeat it, well preserved, and in its entirety Free- 
man's work is a better reproduction of French opera bouffe than any 
adaptation I know of on our stage. Farnie, the well kuown English 
adapter, not only destroys the dialogue, he also destroys the spirit, in all 
his productions. It i3, perhaps, as well that the condition which char- 
acterizes the French libretto does not mark the English. Our public is 
not as well up on the subject of mythology as it might be. This science 
is not a part of our common school course of study, and beyond a vague 
notion, based upon a few pictures and statues, our theatre goers, generally 
speaking, have no knowledge of the matter. The lack of intellectual 
satire, which marks this translation, is therefore a popular quality, if it 
is a critical fault. The music is too familiar to require mention. The 
score is sparkling from overture to finale. It is Offenbach's masterpiece. 
***** 

As a performance, Orpheus and Eurydicehs highly entertaining. It is 
vivacious from commencement to end. It is instinct with brightness and 
motion. The costumes are brilliant and generous— brilliant in color, and 
generous in abbreviation. The chorus sings admirably, but the female 
part of it does not possess the essential qualification of beauty, either of 
face or of form. They are a thin, homely, gawky lot. This is a most 
surprising fact. The reputation of this company for female beauty is 
well-known. It helped till the Bijou in New York every night for nearly 
foui months. If the Orpheus chorus girls are attractive to the New York 
men, a wave of depraved taste must have swept over their clubs. 
***** 

But when we turn to the more important members of this troupe, we 
find female beauty ad libitum. Jennie Prince as Diana, Annie Caldwell 
as Venus, Jennie McNulty. as Mercury and Maud Waldemereas Minerva, 
are fair, very fair to behold. They wear lovely costumes, that leave but 
little to the imagination, and stand around the stage on exhibition. That 
is all they do do. The nine principal artists of the company who really 
sing and act are one and all deserving of mention. E. S. Grant is simple 
and pastoral as Aristeus, and in a mild degree devilish as Pluto. Ge>. 
Boniface, Jr., plays Styx in a slightly exaggerated, but very effective 
burlesque spirit. His solo, " When I was Monarch of Arcadia," is 
a«'m : rably sung and should not suffer, as it does, from lack of apprecia- 
tion. Harry Pepper — the Orpheus of the cast — is not much of an actor, 
but he has a clear, strong tenor voice, of agreeable quality, and he sings 
with taste and expression. His violin playing is execrable, and it would 
be advisable to substitute illusion for realism in this matter, and let the 
beautiful solo of the first act be played by one of the orchestra. Augusta 
Roche is a woman of many inches, and very properly makes a very im- 
pressive Public Opinion. She has a good contraitjp voice, with but limited 
opportunity to use it. Laura Joyce is very amusing as Juno. She acts 
wicti spirit and sings satisfactorily. Daisy Murdock is a pretty little 
body, full of life and action. She is reminiscent of Gracie Plaisted. Ida 
Mulle looks the little god Cupid to perfection. She is a little bit of a 
creature, admirably proportioned and with pretty features. She suggests 
a delicious little French statuette. She has a surprising amount of voice 
for such a wee body, and sings with expression. Her manner is most cap- 
tivating in its archness and vivacity. These two diminutive creatures sing 
Redding's well kuown waltz duet with charming effect. Digby Bell acts 
Jupiter with much humor. He enters completely into the true spirit of 
the part and plays it apparently con amore. In sharply indicating the 
burlesque idea of the character, he is thoroughly artistic. His tone, his 
gestures and manner are all admirably to the purpose. I will cite as an 
instance Jupiter's entrance into Pluto's " Boud"ir," with tipped crown 
and cigar in mouth and a general appearance of " out on-abat ; away 
from the old woman." Mighty Jove, as a hen-pecked husband, is a spec- 
tacle of ludicrous incongruity, and Digby Bell portrays it with a true ap- 
preciation of its humorous sense. Sydney Rosenfeld's topical son; t Digby 
Bell sings in such an inimitable manner ami with such infinite gusto, 
that it is made the hit of the performance. There is one fault to be found 
with this clever actor. I allude to his bad taste in making personal allu- 
si tea of a disagreeable nature. This is a reprehensible practice, and 
should not be tolerated by those in charge. 



About Marie Vanoni I feel like gushing. She is a perfect French 
opera-bouffiste. The like of her does not exist on our stage. If our pub- 
lic wish to know what the Parisians call chic, let them watch Vanoni. 
She has more chic in her little toe than Aime*e in her whole body. Va- 
noni would create a furore in Paris, where Aimee has never been able to 
score even a moderate success. Vanoni has a fair voice, but she does not 
sing well. She both shrieks and flats, and yet her manner of singing a 
song is so irresistible that such fault-finding is absurd. Anything more 
catching, more fascinating, than Vanoni's three selections in the third act 
can not be imagined — the French chanson, the Spanish song and ; * Pretty 
as a Picture." Each one of these three songs is sung with distinctive 
characteristics, and yet with the one individuality. AitneVs " Pretty as a 
Picture," and Alice Harrison's attempt of the Spanish song, are vile 
performances when brought into comparison with Vanoni's performance. 
The French chanson is sung with the true Judic manner. In her move- 
ments Vanoni is agility itself. The grace and sprightline3S of a ballet 
premiere is seen in her every step. All in all, Vanoni is a remarkable 
creature. 

***** 

As specialties form a good part of the performance, I suggest an addi- 
tion in the shape of a song and dance by Augusta Roche and Ida Mulle. 

The effect would be paralyzing. 

***** 

In the programme, a whole list of gods and goddesses, graces and muses 
are given, but they are not distinguishable by any individuality of appear- 
ance on the stage. 

***** 

On Monday the Siene Opera Company commence a season at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre. The performances are to be on Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday of each week. This troupe is not a small, indifferently-organized 
combination, but a large, thoroughly equipped company of firBt-class 
artists. Their Mexican season was a highly successful one. The princi- 
pals are all artists of high excellence — two of them having more than a 
mere local reputation. The prima dona, Signora Damerini, holds high 
rank, and the tenor, Signor Giannini, is counted among the best of tenors. 
The troupe is admirably equipped in Bcenery and costumes. The per- 
formances here are to be with large chorus aud large orchestra, and with 
every detail of mise en scene properly attended to. The prices of admission 
are reasonable. Aida is the first opera to be produced. The repertoire 
includes Hubert the Devil, The Prophet, and several other operas but rarely 
sung in San Francisco, as well as two new works. For the second evening 
Norma is announced. It remains to be seen whether the public will ap- 
preciate first-class operatic performers, without being forced into patron- 
age by a system of puffery and excitement. I hope it will. 

***** 

At the Standard, a troupe of Jubilee Singers have appeared during the 
week. The performance is of the usual sort, and does not require descrip- 
tion. The troupe is a very good one. 

It is difficult to understand the taste of the masses. In the Devils 

Auction, now in its third week and still drawing large audiences, the hit 

of the performance, judging by the applause, are the songs introduced, I 

will not say sung, by Louise Dempsey. With a cracked, vulgar voice, she 

indulges in a few trashy tuues with idiotic words, and receives generous 

applause, while the marvelous acrobatics of the Herbert Bros. — the most 

daring and perfectly-executed act of the kind ever seen here, on stage or 

in circus ring — the remarkable contortions of Martinetti, the clever panto- 

mime of Maffitt, and the graceful dancing of the two premieres and of 

the prettily clad ballet — the meritorious features of the show meet with 

but little appreciation. The Staircase Band is an amusing conceit. On 

Monday next, the Black Raven, another spectacular extravaganza, will be 

produced by the same troupe— the coryphees appearing in new costumes 

and new dances. 

« * * * * 

Gillette continues to fill the Tivoli nightly. There is some talk of Helen 
Dingeon joining the troupe of this popular place of resort. 

i * * * * 

Gertrude Griswold, who took the Grand Prix do Conservatoire, is now 
singing with great success in London.^— The operatic outlook for New 
York, for the season '84-'S5, is a rather sorrowful one. Both Gye and 
Strakosch are reported to be the coming Director for the Metropolitan 
Opera House, and it is asserted that Fides Devrieut and Gayarre will both 
sing to the Gothainites, but there is nevertheless much doubt as to there 
being any opera at all. The Academy Directors are seriously thinking of 
leasing their building to Emma Abbott and her company — to include Lil- 
ian Russell. Words fail me!— ^There is a report that Van Zandt will 
shortly marry a very wealthy Polish nobleman, and retire from the stage. 
■^— Geo. A. Conly's widow lost every cent she possessed in the world by 
the failure of Hatch & Foote, the New York bankers. 

***** 

Ida Mulle and Daisy Murdock are called the Pony Team. 

Beauclerc. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Lessee aud Manager. SIR. M. B. LEAVITr | Actiug Manager Mr. JAY RIAL 

jy TO-NIGHT. -GALLAGHER, GILMORE & GARDNER'S 

DEVIL'S AUCTION! 

Magnificent Scenic Effects! Beautiful Ballets! And the Latest Sensation, THE 
STAIRCASE BAND. MATINEE SATURDAY. 

Monday Next-Great Double Hill, THE BLACK RAVEN. And J. S. Slaffitt's 
Great Creation, COSIANCHES. Julj 1!'. 

TELEGRAPH HILL 

OBSERVATORY AND CONCERT HALL! 

SATUEVAY, JULY lOth-FAREWELL WEEK 

— OK THE FAMOUS — 

HUNGARIAN GIPSY BAND! 

They will Appear Every Evening and Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday Afternoons. 



July 19, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



SPORTING. 



Yachting. Th* Hr«t have all - m Santa Cras and Monte- 

Joyon and Ladv Mm. were tin- rtr-t to arrive. Tl 

i Sunday, nth, and reached their 
anchorage at 11:30 a. w. on Edondny. The Larline loft Santa Crui ;it 
1:90 \. H» and vaa becalmed off the lighthouse for5j hours, wh 

Kleur da ui j tlned bar. They m< I t .: 1 breexo to Point Pedro, where 

a calm atrau delavad th« Lurline it 6 hours, sod her Captain and 
oraw had a pN-asiint time fishing. The Klcur de Lii reached Meiffgs' 
Wharf ;>t S P. if. Holiday. The Lurline inch red al Saucelito at 3 P. m 
I »v. The Nellie came direct from Monterey, leaving that port at 
"J !■- M. Friday. She was abreast uf I'uemi I'uint at 9 P. If., and be 
osliDad until 1:30 a. M. on Saturday, A good breeze carried bar to the 
I taada, and she dropped anchor at Saucelito ftt 10:30 A. m. on Saturday, 
■-••-■• came op early in the week, in good style. The Annie made 
the trip up in 1M hours. The Airgie was the last t<> leave, but we ill 
n>>t gat a -Ufc'ht of her log early enough f"r this notice. She made a 
d1 aini hat trip up. A full- rigged model of Mr. J. V. Coleman's 
nam y.u'ht, the Oarmelita, has just reached that gentleman's office from 
New V.»rk. It in the handsomest piece of yacht-modeling we have ever 
The original design is by the celebrated marine architect, A. t'arv 
Smith, of New York, and the mechanical work of the model is from the 
bauds of Q. Graham, of the same place. The Carmelita is a keel-boat, 
■ flush deck and schooner- rigged, and her lines are in sharp contrast bo any- 
thing built for these waters. With an overall measurement of SO feet, 
she is hut 65:6 on the water-line, giving her an immense overhang, which 
looks as beautiful as it is remarkable. Her beam is only 16.6 feet, and she 
has a draft aft of 10 feet — another feature that will surprise our local 
yachtsmen, who have all along held out for plenty of beam. Of her Bail- 
ing qualities, judged by her model, opinions will vary. We think she 
will prove as fast and weatherly as our own beamy craft. Her spars are 
! lofty, mainmast 46. 1 feet, main topmast 30.6 feet, and main boom 47.4 
i feet. The foremast 43.10 feet, fore topmast 27.6 feet. Her topmasts are 
| all housing. To make her keep her feet with the spread of canvas these 
ftpan will carry, she will have 11.584 tons of lead ballast on her keel, and 
20 tons of load inside. Aloft and below, she will have everything which 
I mechanical skill and good taste can suggest to make her a perfect yacht. 

Troatlng Notes.— From the northeastern lakes, Donner, Independ- 
[ ence and Tahoe, the reports are extremely favorable, the fishing being 
i tfood ami the trout caught very large. In Pescadero Creek, seven miles 
from Truckee, good fishing is reported. From Bi^ Trees, Calaveras 
county, the reports are highly satisfactory, fine catches being recently 
taken from the Calaveras river and adjacent streams. A gentleman whj 
is sin-nding his vacation at Big Trees writes as follows : "On July 9th, 
between 9:30 a. M. and 6 p. M., I caught 208 fish, and took it pretty easy, 
too." In Carmel Lagoon, ten miles from Monterey, some fine baskets 
were filled last week. Anglers from all parts of the State report the 
streams unusually high for this season of the year. This indicates that 
fishing will be good for several weeks yet, and that the fish will be 
larger, on an average, than for many seasons past. At this season of the 
year, barraendda and bonita can be found outside the heads, just over 
the bar. Trolling for these fish is the finest kind of sport. We beg to 
suggest to our yachtsmen that they can find a new and exciting sport if 
they will try a little outside cruising during the next six weeks, and take 
some lines and trolling spoons along. In Monterey Bay, off Point Pinos, 
a few salmon have recently been taken, the largest landed weighing 
22 pounds. Last year several salmon were caught between Chinatown 
and the railroad wharf, in Monterey Bay. Anglers visiting that place 
might take advantage of this reminder, and try again. The Lurline 
Fishing Club is one of the pleasantest outdoor organizations in the city. 
Last Sunday they had their fourth excursion, and spent a thoroughly 
enjoyable day. The members of the club and guests present, were 
Messrs. Bettis, Eidenmuller, Leopold, McCann, Schwilk, Nolting, 
Engdberg, Kohn, McVey, Donohue, Solderer, Goldstein, Fowler, Stover, 
Slattery and Commodore Eastman. The party started on the plunger, 
Annie, at 6:30 a. si., and anchored off Alcatraz, where lines were soon 
dropped overboard and the first fish, a fine rock cod, was hauled up by 
Hugo Leopold, The fishing was thoroughly satisfactory, all hands 
making good strings. Later in the day sail was made for California City, 
where the clam chowder was prepared and enjoyed on shore, and sports 
and pastimes enjoyed very heartily. About dusk the party returned to 
the city, with a favorable breeze. 

Fishing. —Last Sunday a large number of boats were out from Sauce- 
lito. Near Yellow Bluff and Lime Point good catches were made, the 
strings being chiefly made up of rock cod of large size. From Point 
Tiburon there was the usual fleet of boats, but earl v in the day the catches 
were under the average. In the afternoon, at the top of high water, there 
was a marked improvement. The steamer Edith, so favorably known 
amongst anglers for successful trips to the Farallones, varied the pro- 
gramme last Sunday by making a trip to well known fishing points around 
the bay. The trip was enjoyable by contrast to the usual outside work ; 
no one being seasick, but the fishing was only moderately good. The 
flow of fresh water from the Sacramento river is unusually large at pres- 
ent, and interferes materially with the tud of fish, especially in Raccoon 
Straits. The first shad ever caught by hook and line in the waters of 
this bay, was taken by B. F. Catlin, at Oakland wharf, last Saturday. 
The young fish was a fine specimen, nine inches long. Mr. Catlin's suc- 
cess on Saturday was followed by Mr. W. Lindsay on Sunday. While 
fishing for smelts at Kershaw's Point he booked a shad weighing about two 
pounds. The bait used in each instance was mussel worms. Anglers 
may now look for fishing that will give more sport than heretofore with 
rod and line. 

Cricket.— Last Saturday the third match for the Harrison trophy was 
played between the Occident and Merion Clubs. The Occident appeared 
on the field with two men short, and suffered a defeat. Apart from be- 
ing short-handed, the batting of the Occidents was the weakest display 
we have ever 3een them make. To-day the Merions play a club match. 
On 14th of June, at Bexley, England, the most remarkable match on 
record was played. The Emereti eleven played an eleven of Bexley, and 
the former scored 131; then J. Shuter, Captain of the Surrey county 



• ■ ut to thi wi.ket* with T. Aahdown to rapreatot Bexlej 
time was called there w,i* n , wicket down, and th< 

< If these, Sbul 

will ii in k - bj -71 runs and 10 wlokata. The I 'I,. in ara holding 

their own manfully Id England. 1'p to the moal i i • they 

have phiyed twelve match.-* ; won five, lost four, nlnl tOrM w.r dm WO. 

Tin' averagee ol the U am In matches arc I i rj they 

■how up well. Fourteen plajan hart taken part and fifteen Ii 
haw been played. It. s. N. uhall haada the Met with -'-i G2, and he hai 
the honor of making the moet in an Inolngi 120 ; bnl W Bro< trie, Jr., 
rune lii in hard with 113 not out. and an average of -I 38, < 'I the i 

player*, eleven have m ide averages of double figures, the loweet beiD{{ II. 

McNutt. with 13 ( 60, li i- very ploaaantto know that onr countryman 
have been delightfully io throughout Gnat Britain and 1 1 

but, then, cricketers recognise no national distinctions. 

Pigeon Shooting. Last Saturday, at BirdV Point, the Alameda 
Sportsman's Club held the fifth match of the Boaeon. The shooting was 
my g I, Bennett carrying off the medal with a clean soon. Snowies 

came next with 11. Adams Pollock and Norton each killed HI, ILisloli 

and t: lall bringing '.' to grass. Haven* finishing at the rear with 8. The 

match was shot, as usual, under I lurlin^'hani rule*. Kor to morrow a 
handicap 11 ur iiiudiam match has been arranged at Bird's Point. The 

following names and distances have been banded qs: Robinson, 32 yards: 
Lambert, Fay and Hopper, 30 yards; Pearson, Walsh, Blade, Kerrigan, 
H. Baaford and F. J. Basford, 29 yards; Precnt, Jellett. Eyre, Maillot 
and IJnrbank, 28 yards; Thompson, 26 yards. The entrance i* §10 each, 
with S25 added— IS birds each, 100 yards boundary. Some close scores 
should he made. 

Bicycling. — Mr. Henry C. Finkler is the most devoted wheelman in 
this part of the country. No other bicyclist has done so much to promote 
Pennine racing as he. At long or short distances he is equally at horn.-, 
and has, iu the main, managed to come out ahead at all distances. Be 
has now attained another niche in the temple of fame, by traveling the 
longest distance of any amateur wheelman in California in so many con- 
secutive days, riding 7S7 miles in fifteen days, the trip extending through 
many northern and some of the "southern counties. To-morrow the San 
Francisco Club will have a run to San Kafael. This will be the first 
visit of our wheelmen to this fashionable suburb. The riders will go 
over on the 10 A. M. boat to Saucelito, and ride by road to San Rafael. 

Lawn Tennis.— Last Sunday we spent a most enjoyable day watching 
several games on the grounds of the Lotus and San Rafael Clubs. The 
members of the Lotus Club were early in the field. Nine o'clock found 
Messrs. Raymond, Bradford, Moore and Brander on opposite sides of the 
net, and play was kept up vigorously, with many variations of Bides, for 
three hours. Later in the day we visited the San Rafael Club's grounds, 
and found a large attendance of members. Two, and sometimes three, 
courts were full. The best sets we noticed were between Messrs. McG-a- 
vin and Lieut. Townley against Dr. Williams and H. Thompson. They 
played three sets of 11 each, Dr. Williams and Mr. Thompson winning 
the first and second by to 2 and 6 to 3. The third was in favor of their 
opponents by G to 3. Messrs. Newhall, Bee, Heathcote, Severance, 
Evans, Captain Smith, Jackson and others took part iu some excellent 
games during the afternoon. 

To-day we bid bon voyage to one of the most thorough, all-round 
sportsmen California has ever known. Clem Dixon starts for a trip to 
Europe this afternoon. We wish him a thoroughly enjoyable trip and a 
speedy return. He is a man we cannot do without. 

BALDWIN THEATRE 

AL. HAYMAN 

ggTGala Performance Sunday Ni*ht. To-Night. 
Sunday, and Saturday Matinee. 

BIJOTJ BURLESQUE COMPANY! 

ORPHEUS AND E R U D Y C E ! 

With its Local Hits, Topical Songs, Gorgeous Costumes tnd Brilliant Misc-en-Scene! 

PRICES.— Reserved Seats [Dress-Circle and Orchestra), SI 50; General Admission, 
SI; Balcony, 50c; Gallery, 25c. Matinees, 50c. and 75c. Secure your seats. 

VANONI, in her Great Specialties! DIGBY BELL, in his Great Topical Song, 
" In Other Respects I'm D..ing 0.uito Well." IDA MULLE and DAISY MUKDOCK, 
" Thou Art Mine Own Love -Believe Mi." LAURA JOYCE BELL, "Don't Put On 
a Pious Air " Augusta Roche, Jennie Prince, Jennie McNulty, Annie Caldwell and 
Thirty Others in the Cast! ORPHEUS AND ERUDYCE a Great Success! Ham- 
Pepper, E. 8. Grant, George C. Boniface and Twenty Others. July 19. 



Lessee and Manager 

Every Evening, including 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Monday Evening July 21, 1884. 

Inauguration ol CAMBIAGGIO, S1ENI AND LAMPANI'S 
GRAND ITALIAN OPERA SEASON! 

The Most Perfect and Complete Operatic Organization that has Ever Appeared in 

California! A Great Company, Complete Chorus and Grand Orchestra! 

MONDAY EVENING, JULY 21st, 

Will be presented in its entirety, Verdi's Masterpiece, in Four Acts, 

AID A! 

A Full Corps of 150 Auxiliaries! Their Own Appropriate Scenery! Box Office 
open. Orchestra and Dress-Circle, $2; Balcony, $1 25. No Operatic Performance 
on Tuesday, Saturday or Sunday Evenings. Wednesday Evening, July 28 NORMA. 

[July 19.) CHAS. L. PIERCE, Manager. 

TIV0LI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near M arkct.— Kreling- Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Managers.— Positively Last Nights of Audran's Latest Comic Opera, in 
Three Acts, 

Gillette ! 

Produced with Elegant Scenery, Costumes and Appointments, for the First Time 
in, America. Grand Chorus and Orchestra and an Excellent Cast. 
Monday, July 21st— Grand Production of UN BALLO IN MASCHERA. 
Admission, 25 cents. Reserved seats, 50 cents. July 19. 

DIVIDEND NO. ONE HUNDRED AND SIX. 

Tbe Home Mnlnal Insurance Company will pay its Regu- 
lar Monthly Dividend of One Dollar (SI) per share upon its capital stock on 
July 10th. 1581. CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 



SAN FRAJSTOISCO NEWS LETTER A$TD 



July 19 ; 1884. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

The Prevention of Blindness.— The action of the Ophtbalmological 
Socii ty of the United Kingdom in taking steps to bring about some dim- 
inution of tbe present large amount of hopeless blindness caused by the 
ophthalmia of early infancy, will, we are confident, meet with the gen- 
eral approval of the profession. Blindness is, for the individual, a catas- 
trophe, and for the community a grievous burden. The statistics just 
collected by the society fully confirm the result arrived at by the investi- 
gation of 22 blind asylums in Germany; one-third of the inmates of theBe 
asylums, both in Germany and in England, would be in full possession of 
their sight but for tbe terrible consequences of a disease which is among 
the most certainly curable of all disr-iises. We h«ipe the local government 
boards may be induced to accede to the proposed plan by which the reliev- 
ing officers in England, and the inspectors of the poor in Scotland, would 
be made use of to distribute cards giving simple instructions to mothers 
to euable them to recognize tbe first symptoms of the disease, and to 
understand its gravity. — Public Opinion. 

Sentences to Death. — From a Parliamentary return just issued, it 
appears that iu the year 1881 twenty-four per3 -ns were sentenced to death 
for the crime of murder in England and Wales. In thirteen cases the sen- 
tences were commuted, eleven to penal servitude for life, and two to confine- 
ment at Broadmoor. In 1882 the capital sentences numbered twenty-two ; 
fourteen of the criminals were executed, six are undergoing penal servi- 
tude for life, and two are at Broadmoor. Last year twenty-three persons 
received sentence of death ; five of these sentences were commuted to 
penal servitude for life, two to removal to Broadmoor, and in one case 
tbe death sentence was commuted to ten years penal servitude. The ages 
of the persons sentenced ranged from fourteen to seventy, the former 
being the ape of Margaret Messenger, who is now undergoing penal 
servitude for life, and the latter that of Charles Gerrisb, who was exe- 
cuted on January 30, 1882. — Public Opinion. 

Vertical Flight of Bullets.— Experiments have been made at Hart- 
ford, Conn., with the vertical firing Gatling gun, in the presence of a 
number of mechanics, military men, and others interested in gunnery. 
The inclination of the piece was determined by a combined spirit level 
and quadrant. At an inclination of fifteen degrees, the time between the 
discharge and the return of the bullets into the river on the banks of 
which the experiments were made, was fity-nine seconds. On an exact 
vertical fire, the time of return waB fifty-four seconds. The force of the 
return of the bullets— 44 calliber rifle— was sufficient to drive them 
through four inches of pine boards, enough to render any defenses not 
bomproofs untenable against such a shower. 

An explosive mixture for mining purposes has been invented in Ger- 
many. It is composed of saltpetre, chlorate of potash and a solid hydro- 
carbon (paraffine, asphaltum or pitch). When these Bolid ingredients are 
powdered and well mixed, a volatile hydrocarbon (benzine or gasoline) is 
added to dissolve the solid hydrocarbons and form the whole into a plastic 
body capable of being rolled into sheets. The cakes become hard when 
the solvent is evaporated, and they are then broken up into grains like 
gunpowder. 

A telegram from Thuan announces the signature of the treaty be- 
tween France and Annam. By this instrument the provinces of Binh 
Thuan and Than Goa are restored to Annam. A Custom House system 
similar to that existing in Cochin-China is established, and a French 
military occupation of all strategic points in Annam or Tonquin may be 
effected if considered necessary. Part of the citadel of Hue will be held 
by a permanent French garrison. 

For cementing brass on glass, Puscher recommends a resin soap, 
made by boiling one part of caustic soda, three parts of colophonium 
(resin), and five parts of water, and finally kneading the whole in about 
half the quantity of plaster of PariB. As it is not acted upon by petro- 
leum, bears heat very well, and hardens in a short time, it is well suited 
for fastening brass tops on glass lamps. 

Fishes in aquariums often suffer from the attacks of a mould-like fun- 
gus. It has been discovered that immersion for a minute or so in a bath 
of common salt and water, moderately diluted, would cause this adherent 
film of fungus to scale off in large flakes. If applied in time, this remedy 
will prove effectual ; but care must be taken afterward not to put into the 
aquarium any organic material which, by decomposing, would nourish a 
new crop of fungi sowed by flying spores. 

Salting Walks. — The best way, says a correspondent, to apply salt to 
paths, to destroy weeds, is as follows : Boil the salt in water, 1 pound to 
1 gallon, and apply the mixture boiling hot with a watering pot that has 
a spreading rose. This will keep weeds and worms away for two or three 
years. Put 1 pound to the square yard the first year; afterward a a weaker 
solution may be applied when required. — Scientific American. 

Rubber or gutta-percha may be united firmly to metal by the fol- 
lowing method : Dissolve finely-powdered shellic in ten times its weight 
of pure spirits of ammonia. In three days the cement will have the nec- 
essary consistency. The ammonia penetrates tbe rubber and enables tbe 
Bhellac to take a firm hold. When the ammonia is evaporated, the joint 
withstands the penetration of gas or water. 

A useful mucilage for labels, etc., can be made of two ounces of 
dextrine dissolved in one ounce of acetic acid and five ounces of water, 
and the addition of about an ounce of alcohol when the dextrine is well 
dissolved. 

A company In Connecticut manufactures nearly all the licorice used 
in this country, 17,000,000 pounds a year. Confectionery and medicine 
take about 1,500,000 pounds, and the remainder goes into tobacco. 

Young men who are preparing themselves for the battle of life cannot 
procure any better equipment than a thorough business education. This 
is always a good thing to have around, and one cannot tell at what mo- 
ment its possession may be essential to success. Nor is this education 
very difficult to obtain. Heald's Business College, of this city, an excel- 
lently organized educational establishment, presided over by a large staff 
of accomplished professors, is open to all, and its terms are very moder- 
ate. This College, by the way, has just graduated 58 of its students, 
who had come from all parts of the coast to enjoy tbe advantages the in- 
stitution offers. 



MY LOVE. 

She doth little kindnesses, 

Which most leave undone or despise, 

For naught that sets one heart at ease 

And giveth happiness or peace 

Is low-esteemed in her eyes. 

Blessing she is : God made her so ; 

And deeds of week-day holiness 

Fall from her noiseless as the snow. 

Nor hath Bhe ever chanced to know 

That aught were easier than to bless, — Lowell. 

WONDERFUL DEVELOPMENTS IN OPTICAL SCIENCE. 

All complicated cases of defective vision most carefully tested, 
after the most progressive method known to opthalmology, and, if any 
morbid changes are indicated, I will be only too happy to recommend the 
best opthalmic surgeon on the Coast in time ; especially in young children, 
where progressive myopia is manifested, and thereby induce parents t'j 
seek the advice of an occulist. It is a well-known fact that the majority 
of near-sighted persons, especially if suited by a patent process, rest in 
fancied security when their cases really need the attention of a pathologist. 
Near-sighted eyes are looked upon as unsound, with but a few exceptions. 

All errors of refraction corrected with suitable glasses, appliable to 
myopia, hypermotropia, simple compound and mixed cases of astigmat- 
ism. My lenses are made by the most skillful workmen of Paris, to or- 
der. Being constantly occupied in testing defective eyes, I have no dis- 
position to lose valuable time in doing automatic labor at grinding lenses. 

Compound Astigmatic Lenses mounted to order in two hours* notice. 
O. Muller, Optician, 135 Montgomery St., near Bush. 

"Cottages, or Hints on Economical Building," is the title of a 
very useful little work just issued by Mr. Wtn. T. Comstock, No. 6, 
Astor Place, New York, under the editorship of A. W. Bruner, a well- 
known architect and writer on cognate subjects. The book contains 
twenty-four plates of medium ant low-cost houses, contributed by 
different New York architects, together with descriptive letter-press 
giving practical suggestions for cottage building. There is also a chapter 
on water supply, drainage, sewerage, heating and ventilation, and other 
sanitary questions relating to country houses, from the pen of Mr. Wm. 
Paul Gerhard, a distinguished civil engineer and writer upon sanitary 
questions. This is a work of great practical value, and, considering that 
the publisher offers to Bend it, postpaid, to any part of tbe world for SI, 
it should enjoy a very wide circulation. 

Young Men!—Read TWs.—The Voltaic Belt Co., of Marshall, 
Mich., offer to send their celebrated Electro-Voltaic Belt and other 
Electkical Appliances on trial for thirty days, to men (young or old) 
afflicted with nervous debility, loss of vitality and manhood, and all kin- 
dred troubles. Also for rheumatism, neuralgia, paralysis and many oth- 
er diseases. Complete restoration to health, vigor and manhood guaran- 
teed. No risk is incurred, as thirty days' trial is allowed. Write them 
at once for illustrated pamphlet free. 

One would have supposed that the Chinese who have been sent to 
London to assist at the Health Exhibition would have been struck by 
the many (to them) strange and wonderful sights, such as railways. The 
national stolidity of character was never, however, better exemplified 
than at present, for they do not seem to regard anything with either 
curiosity or interest. The only matter that has called forth any remark 
or attention has been the electric light, which they do seem to consider 
is something out of the ordinary. 

Children afflicted with eruptions on the face and head while teething 
should be washed with Boncuti, aud care should be taken that no other 
soap is used. The alkali in cocoanut oil and imitation Castile Soaps, 
which are sold in bars and then cut up, is especially irritating and dan- 
gerous in Buch cases. 

Everything new and stylish in Cravats, Scarfs, Collars, Cuffs, Shirts, 
Underwear and Gents 1 Furnishing GoodB, is for sale at bed rock prices at 
J. W. Carmany's, No. 25 Kearny street. 

The Fredericksburg Brewing Company's Kaiser Beer is a fit 

drink for the gods — or anybody else who has a good taste. 

INSURANCE. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY^ 

OF HAMBURG. 

Capital 81,500,000.00 I Assets Jan. 1. 1-1*1. oss.o lr>.«3 

Surplus 227.38S.90 | Invested in the U. S. 491,234.28 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

332 California street, Han Francisco Cat., 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 I rimes; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; lialoise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lluvds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
Juno 9; HARRY VV. SYZ. Agent. 420 and 42-> California St . , S. F. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

Cash Assets 1,709.976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, OUTHRIE 4 CO., General Agents, 
March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



July L», 1884. 



OALlH'oKMA ADVERTISER 



SUNBEAMS. 



MEN OF THE 
Than mi » ycnnK Fellow n»ui"i Ward, 
Who pot Into thy man <>f the Sword ; 

Hi- did it to veil 

The General, they tell, 
Baldi "Now I ROD busted V<y Thunder!" 
There was a young man named Eno, 
Who pliivf.l neither poker nor keno ; 

Bat dabbled in sttx k-, 

s.. lost the bank's "rocks," 
And now he hi aot to be seoa-o. 
There was an "til codger named Flah, 
Who had dncata and held h'xtsh "posiah;" 

Till one morning in May 

His hunk atoppe I 
With ajwatB amounting to "Dish." ~ N. Y. Life. 

You go to a Summer hotel, down by the sounding sea or away up in 

.ins. Well, there co tries a day raw, foggy, cold ; the 
man nry drops thirty-eight degrees in two hours. Yon wander all over 
the house, op stain and down, from L*ellar to roof and back affain, shiver- 
ing in your Summer clothes, hunting a tire. There is none. There isn't a 
fireplace in the home. Noraatove. Nor any place to put one. You 
ave ■ tire. Yon can sit round and shiver, and that's the best you 
. and von don't have to make any effort to do it. Who ever heard 
of tires in a Summer hotel? the proprietor scornfully asks, and the clerk 
says, with yreater scorn, that nobody ever asks for such a thing except 
some greenhiiru from the West. That's all right ; you are accustomed to 
have the proprietor and clerk use you for an ottoman, so you don't mind 
that. But about two o'clock the next week, when you are in bed snatch- 
Ing ■ moment's sleep while the mosquitoes go out and 8ing, when it is so 
hot that the shingles on the honse warp and curl up, the hotel catches 
fire in six places, burns to the ground, and you escape with the clothes 
that you wear in bed. That's what makes you m&d— Burlington Hawkeye. 

Soon will the little clerkling sigh 

For mountain, beach, or country side, 
And from his weakly pay lay by 
Just cash enough to barely tide 
Him o'er vacation. 
And when at last on mountain peak, 

Or by the sea, or in the clover, 

You'd scarcely think to hear him speak 

That he was lord and ruler over 

Half creation. — The Judge. 

A fashionable Austin lady was very much shocked last Sunday at 
hearing the strains of au operatic air that were wafted from a neighbor- 
ing beer saloon. "The police ought to stop that profane music on Sun- 
dap," she remarked indignantly. " Why, that's the same air we heard 
this morning in church," lemarked her husband. " Yes, but that's a dif- 
ferent thing." " What's the difference ? " " We had our best clothes on 
then. That makes all the difference in the world." Texas Sittings. 

A man who boarded at a ten-cent restaurant in Hartford for about six 
years made a mistake the other day by eating one of the terracotta fire- 
proof pies in the show-case that was placed there as a sign to attract cus- 
tomers. He afterwards went and told the landlord that it was about the 
best thing he had eaten since he had come to the house, and wanted to 
know if they had changed their cook. — Hartford Telegram. 

"O!" exclaimed Miss Gushington, looking at the portrait. "How 
natural those eyes are! They look as though they were alive!" "Yes," 
replied Charles, " it is a life's eyes picture, you know." "No," said Fogg, 
at the circus, " I don't take any interest in the peformance of the woman 
with the iron jaw. Don't ask me why. You don't know Mrs. Fogg." 

Not What She Meant. — Governess: " Now, tell me, Ethel, what let- 
ter comes after H ?" Ethel: " Please, Miss Parker, I don't know." Gov: 
"What have I got by the side of my nose?" Ethel: "A lot of pow- 
der." — London Judy. 

When a man's head swims there is generally less water than whisky 
about it. — N. Y. News. 

The world of art is deeply indebted to the Taber Dry Plate, which 
has reduced photography to a degree of accuracy and celerity which neces- 
sarily results in magnificent pictures of the most difficult subjects. No 
photographer can make any pretense of keeping in the front rank of his 
profession who does not avail himself of the advantages offered by this 
great auxilliary. Its sensitiveness enables the operator to secure rich, 
clear negatives with the aid of the electric or any other strong light, and 
without the assistance of the sun. Taber, of No. 8 Montgomery street, 
manufactures this plate in large quantities, and sells to the trade at 
reasonable prices. 

The London Times traces the rise and progress of velocipedes, and 
remarks that "cyclists" are not the least remarkable among the pro- 
ductions of our time. The results of the improvements made in bi- 
cycles and trycicles is so familiar that no one will be surprised to hear 
that there are now some 300,000 "cyclists" in the kingdom; that the 
capital invested in their manufacture is about £2,500,000, employing 
some 6,000 to 10,000 men. 

Keep healthy by going to the Sheltered Cove Baths, North Beach, 
and taking a plunge in the briny every couple of days at the least. Cars 
run right to the spot. 

An excursion train over the S. P. K. R, leaves Fourth and Townsend 
streets for Monterey and Santa Cruz every Sunday morning at 7:50. The 
trip only costs S3. 

A magnificent assortment of Japanese curiosities and works of art 
is to be seen at G. T. Marsh & Co's., No. 625 Market street. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON A MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 
No*. S2J iiimI 3'J| <nlltornlit n|i-<-*>(, Nmii FrniirUrit, «'al. 

Fire Insurance. 



LTURAI of V , fori 

\U,I M \N\i.\ f P 

BO \m W> Of 1 

CITIZENS' ..i s 

FARRAG1 T ol Now York 

FIREMAN'S «.i BiltfrooN 

GERMAN ol PitUbunjb 

U1KAK1> of Philadelphia 



IR1 INO .,( v 

MECHANICS' ..i \ , . 

Ml ritoPOLII \Nl-l,vn..:i I8S0I N V. 
M.w ORLB INS INS. ASSOC! ITION 

PENNSYLVANIA. .■■ Pftteburgh 

PEOPLE'S ol Pll 

BT I'M i ..i 

TEUTON1A of Now urlcant 



LONDON AND NORTHWESTERN ol Manchester. 
Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE GO of Loodon 

LA KttNuiERE MARINE INSURANCE OOMPAHI of Parii 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

All Lo»se$ Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON, 

320 ami 322 California Mtreet. Nan PraurlNro, «'al 
HUTCHINSON & MANN Managers i w. L. 0HALMBR& .Special and Adjuster 

(Orynnlzed 1SG3.) 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. , 

Assets 81,400,000 | Losses paiil over - .. 85,000.000 

E^pThe Largest Assets ami Largest Income of nil ttio Companies liuilini,' from 
west o! New York Stato. Does a larger business on the Pacific Coast than an; 
other Company, Local, Eastern or Foreign. 

l>. J. STAPLES President! \VM. J. DUTTOH Secretary 

ALPHEUS BULL.. Vice-President | E. W. CARPENTER Asst. SeoretUJ 



HOME OFFICE, 
COR CALIFORNIA AND 

SAN FKANCISCO. 
Ageuts in all prominent localities. 



SOUTHWEST 



SANSOMB STS. 

Sept. 22. 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE 1VS( RAN< 'E. 

Capital Paid TJp in TJ. S. Gold Coin). $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 75 

Assets January 1, I8S4 $759,475,13 1 Premiums, since organ tzat'n . $4, f>l 1,827.1 57 

Surplus for policyholders S752.0SRS.73 Losses, since organization . .§1,972,01)8.40 

Net Surplus (over everything) $252,036.98 | 

OFFICERS : 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | R H. MAGILL General Agent 

Dikectors ok tiik Home MUTUAL Insurasce Co.— L L. Raker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. N. Shepard, JohnCurrev.J F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse, Chauncey 
Taylor, St. Huff, J. S. Carter, H. P. Coon. April 12. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8750,000 | Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading: Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

Secretary I GUST AVE TOUC1I ARD President 

.General Agent IN. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. ijllUKN, Snricvor 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, $20, 000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, $10,000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE~lNSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool. Capital, $5,000,000- 
W J. CALLIXG11 A.1I « CO., General Agents, 

Aug. 12 - 213-215 Sansome Street 



JAS. D. BAILEY... 
0. P. FARNFIELD., 



A JO .(T POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

.Instituted 1803. 



Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London — 
London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London Established 1836. 

Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

XOBEBT DICKSON, Manager. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building-, 

PHQINIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

L , England. Estab'd 1782,-Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833. -Cash Assets, $1,343,908.04 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851— -Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

HITLER A- H ALDAN, 

General Ajrents Tor Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

BRITISH AND FOREION MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital *J5, 000,000. —Agents: Balfonr, Guthrie A Co., No. 
/ 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



10 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1884. 



GAMBLING. 

That gambling is a passion that has taken a strong hold upon the 
ad\ enturous spirits who are denizens of this far West, is a fact that goes 
without saying. Everybody knows it. Employers who are interested in 
trusted clerks fear it. Wives dread it, and society generally places it 
uiider a ban. The laws of the State are altogether against it. Yet it 
goes on all the same. The passion is so strong that the most severe laws 
known to the statute-book are powerless to repress it. Men take the 
chances of being arrested, fined and exposed, despite all the Legislature 
and police can do to prevent them. Wherever there is an eager demand 
there is sure to be a supply. This is an old axiom, but it is as true as it 
i3 old, and it applies to gambling no less than to other things. Where 
people insist upon gambling they are very sure to find means to that end. 
The law, the fines, the punishments and the force of public opinion are 
all against it in this city, yet it exists, thrives and goes on just as if it 
were one of the most popular institutions in the world. The uninitiated 
wonder how this can be. With stern laws and a well-paid police they 
marvel how such things can prevail. The answer is plain enough. As we 
said before, where there is a demand there is sure to be a supply. 
The truth is that there is money in the business, and, as times 
go, money conquers all difficulties. It enables the gamblers to 
pay occasional fines and to bribe the police. Thus gambling adds 
to its first evil, demoralizes things generally, and does more harm 
than it would do if let alone. What are we to do with this 
widely permeating and growing mischief? Legislation has done its 
best to extirpate it. Public opinion has frowned upon it. The police 
have pretended to assail it with the very ample powers placed within 
their command, yet it goes on all the same. What is to be done in this 
condition of affairs? We would stamp it out altogether if we could. If 
we could suggest any way to accomplish that result we would do it. 
Everything that the law could do has been tried, but in vain. Despite 
everything, gambling-dens exist on our principal streets. And why? Be- 
cause they pay largess to the police. For that payment they are toler- 
ated and let alone. They extort from their customers what they have to 
pay the officers of the law, and thus they are made more exacting and 
worse than they otherwise would be. As the evil cannot be cured, why 
not license it at a very high figure ? That would make its locality known, 
would end the corrupting of the police, and would enable employers occa- 
sionally and suddenly to visit such places to see if their employees were 
there, and they could do so without fear of arrest. Outside gambling- 
houses could be prevented by giving immunity and a large reward to in- 
formers. Looking the evil full in the face, this occurs to us to be the best 
remedy. We know that many good people object to licensing that which 
is in itself evil. But that is the very thing which takes place now, only 
that the money goes to corrupt officials and to influence elections. We 
would strip it of its power to carry primaries, and cause it to be paid 
into the city treasury. We think a high license the best cure for these 
things. If anybody can suggest a better one, we should be glad to know 
what it is. 

SEWERAGE HERE AND ACROSS THE BAY, 

That the sewerage question is looming up and is bound to become 
one of the most absorbing topics of the day, is a fact known to thoughtful 
men, but not sufficiently taken into account by the thoughtless many. 
Yellow fever is creeping along our coast, and is liable at any moment to 
decimate our population. Cholera may come to us any day from the 
East. Both these diseases — yellow fever and cholera — make the more sad 
havoc the worse the sewerage. A foul atmosphere is their breeding 
ground. Where on the face of the globe could they find that atmosphere 
more foul than in our city ? All that region south of Market street and 
below Montgomery street is as bad as it can be, as our present Health 
Officer has often reported. But there is this to be said of San Francisco — 
that, whilst men have done their worst to ruin it, the Controller of the Uni- 
verse has given it advantages that save it from evils that would otherwise 
have long since overtaken it. The strong winds that blow over the penin- 
sula carry off the germs of untold evil. These strong winds are now, always 
have been, and are ever likely to remain, to a very large extent, the 
salvation of our crowded city. Their force is so great that they carry 
away everything that is nasty, impure and contagious. If it had not 
been for that fact, this city would long ago have been subjected to the 
fate of Buenos Ayres. Situated near the banks of the great river, the 
Parana, that city lacked good drainage, and, when the yellow fever came, 
over one-third of its population fell victims to the scourge. The same thing 
is likely to happen on this Coast any day. We are not sure that it can 
occur in San Francisco, because of the strong winds we have spokeD of. 
But Alameda is peculiarly susceptible to it. There the grounds are flat, 
the atmosphere calm, and the sewerage of the bay of the worst possible 
description. It can be, and ought to be, improved in the latter particu- 
lar. There is from all points a fall toward tide water. Oakland, Brook- 
lyn and all the region thereabouts can be easily drained, and it must be, 
or the day is not far distant when they will pay the cost in a terrible pen- 
alty. There are no abnormal winds there to save them from the con:e- 
quences of their own neglect. Once a plague sets in, it will carry all be- 
fore it. Then the disease will be brought to this side of the bay, the con- 
tagion will run rampant, and not even our strong winds will save us. We 
give this note of warning in order that it may serve to suggest a remedy 
in time. We say that the building of cesspools is going on in Alameda 
county in a most reckless and haphazard way. They are without outlet, 
and the soil is made to absorb all that is fetid and impure. Some day 
this pent-up mass of disease germs will break forth with appalling re- 
sults, if the threatened evil be not forthwith taken in hand and dealt with 
as it deserves to be. There should be a new charter, or new laws, of 
some sort, establishing a system of sewerage that would be effective for 
all time to come. We are very sure that this is good counsel given in 
good time. It is so true and so important that no man who lives in the 
thickly populated portions of Alameda county can afford to ignore it. 



Mr. Stanley, the British Consul at San Francisco, is now in British 
Columbia, where the object of his visit is to establish a Vice- Consulate 
at Victoria. He is being hospitably feted by the residents of that colony. 
Wm. Lane Booker, the former British Consul here, is now in London, on 
a leave of absence from his post in New York city. 



CENTRAL PACIFIC. 
The Central Pacific Railroad Company has had a tussle ; it was 
caught foul at a moment when a tide of financial revulsion had converted 
the ground beneath its feet into a quagmire, and pretended friends, half- 
hearted allies and open enemies, piled all upon it at once to roll it in the 
mud, they brought it to its knees ; like Antaeus, the touch of mother 
earth appeared to infuse it with new vigor ; with one noble wrench it has 
turned the tables, and Central Pacific is now on top, where before it stood 
only as a peer amongst peers, made secure and fast in the place it has won 
by new and natural alliances th^.t insure its stability. The stocks of the Cen- 
tral and the Union Pacific Railroad Companies may continue for a while 
longer to be associated together in the public mind, to the extent that 
any great changes in the market value of the one may be sympathetically 
exhibited to some extent in that of the other. But the two stocks have 
essentially parted company. Where the value of Union Pacific may be 
destined to land three years hence, we do not take upon us to guess. It 
has been wrecked by unsound financing, and whether or not it can bear 
the burdens that have been laid upon it is a conundrum for those to solve 
who " dabble " in it. It may be that Union Pacific is destined to repeat 
the career of li Erie," earning, perhaps, the interest on its obligations, 
but of little or no further interest as a dividend proposition. There has 
been none of this doubtful financing in Central Pacific ; indeed, there has 
been no new financing at all. What it was three years ago, that it is to- 
day. Through a singular combination of adverse circumstances it has had 
to pass its July dividend. By this act it has placed itself in position to 
resume dividends at the next half year, and maintain them thereafter — 
as far as merely human intelligence can foresee— permanently and indefi- 
nitely. At a juncture when traffic and earnings had diminished, some 
heavy obligations matured, and the enormous losses of the Southern Pa- 
cific washouts had to be provided for. tinder ordinary circumstances the 
company would have experienced no difficulty. It had made arrange- 
ments providing for the obligations about to mature, but some of these 
proved futile at the critical moment. We do not propose to go into de- 
tails, still less to offer any comment on the course pursued by third parties. 
Suffice it to say that means were found to supply the void thus created, 
and in a way so very advantageous that, as Time will show in his due 
season, quite a new face is put upon the entire issue of securities that are 
listed under the head of " Central Pacific." From this time on, these is- 
sues will gradually work their way to a standing similar to that of theC. 
B. & Q., Atchison & Topeka, and other great trunks that have not been 
manipulated on Gould principles. But we repeat and call special atten- 
tion to the fact that on merit the C. P. and U. P. securities have parted 
company. People who take pains to inform themselves, so far as to real- 
ize this very important fact, will find their account in doing so. 



BOTH SIDES. 
Blaine has been nominated and so has Cleveland. The one is the 
Republican and the other the Democratic standard bearer. The News 
Letter is, as ever, non-partisan. We care not for party names, take no 
stock in party tricks and hate the cant, humbug and ignorant hurrah 
which both Bides seem to feel it necessary to resort to. If we could have 
nominated candidates on both sides we should have put up very different 
men. We should have taken a man from both parties that had made 
a record that was pure and undefined. We do not know that we 
could have done better than have selected Edmunds on the one side 
and Thurman on the other. But the respective National Conventions 
determined otherwise, and the men of their choice are now before the 
country. We care for neither of them. We do not care for Blaine, 
tattooed all over as he is, and we do not enthuse about Cleveland, who 
was but a sheriff the other day, has no national record, and is only 
the result of an accident. It is exceedingly funny that the papers that 
ordinarily hate the Irish and scoff at the candidates elected by their 
votes, are now interviewing Brennan and Rossa, and the dynamiters 
generally, in order to secure their votes for Blaine, because he is said 
to hate Britain and the British. We think that kind of appeal will 
prove, in the hands of those who use it, a two-edged sword. It will 
gain no Irish- Democratic votes, and it will repel every citizen of 
either Scotch or English birth or descent, and they are, for the most 
part. Republicans. Then, as to Cleveland, it is really wonderful how 
the Democrats can become excited and enthused over a man they kuow 
nothing at all about. Cleveland is practically a stranger to them. 
They do not even know that he is, in truth and in fact, a Democrat. 
Judging from what Curtis, Schurz, G-odkin and the New York Times, 
Harpers' Weekly and the other Republican papers say about him, he is 
much more of an "Independent" Republican than a Democrat. But 
then he may be none the worse for all that. The broad fact about 
him is that he has no national record. It is said that that is advantage. 
If that be true, then the man in the moon is about the most available 
candidate we can think of. We know absolutely nothing at all about 
him. 

LET US HAVE FULL WEIGHT. 
There is no greater enemy to organized society than the dishonest 
dealer who sells short weight. This rascal is a sort of sneak thief against 
whom it is very difficult, if not impossible, for consumers to protect them- 
selves. Honest dealers, too, are placed at a disadvantage by the short- 
weight cheat, because they cannot compete with him without adopting 
his dishonest methods. This rogue (and his fictitious weights) is engaged 
in a great many lines of commercial traffic, but more particularly in the 
retail handling of the necessaries of life. It is in this field that his op- 
portunities for getting in his fine work are most numerous aud most ef- 
fective. The ordinary household is but seldom supplied with the neces- 
sary apparatus for re-weighing the commodities delivered there, and the 
ordinary housekeeper is but little inclined to doubt the honesty of those 
with whom she deals, or keep a check upon them. To such outrageous 
lengths has this thing been engrafted upon the coal trade in this city that 
the honest dealers have been obliged to combine against it, and they 
are now seeking the assistance of the city authorities in order to make 
their combination effective. An ordinance looking to this end has been 
drafted, and will be presented to the Board of Supervisors on next 
Monday. Whether or no the provisions of this ordinance are sufficient to 
accomplish the object aimed at is a question of judgment upon which we 
do not feel called upon to express any opinion. 



July 19, ISM. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTI8ER. 



11 



TOWN CRIER. 



"Hhi tb» Crier:" "What lb* dtfll »rt tboo ! 
"Oo» lb»l will play th» tlrvil.tir with yon. 1 ' 

" H»*d a atlm Id hi. tail U lone »• * Ball. 
Whioh niad* him crow bolder uid bolder." 



A dally paper ol this city, which is subject to periodical attaeki of 
>nsJ itch, last Sunday published a column list of what it was 
pi— ad to tana "the Langtrys oi this city." Although lengthy, the 
enumeration b by no ataans complete. Some of our most famous bean- 
tit'' have boon left unnoticed. It i* for the purpose "f pouring consols 
tion Into the souls of tbeae slighted ones that I transform myself tempo- 
rarily Into a portrayer "f female charms, a taffy dinger and, by the beard 
nl bfnhomet, a liar and ;» perjurer. I have not relied upon my own ob- 
servation in this matter. I have can-fully consulted -';17 Ki'.uuy street 
'in backmen, 900 dry-goods clerks, 670 shoe-dealers, 
90 druggists' clerks, and hucksters, milkmen, icecream venders, photo- 
graphers, ragmen, ate, without number, My data make a pile that 
raaohes from t! e top ol my mahogany writing-desk to the frescoed ceil- 
ing. I have the physical, facial ami mental proportions of every piece of 
femininity in the city the size of her foot, the number of her corset, the 

ontt of her bonnet, the color of her stock 1 mean her dress, the weight 

<■( bar switch and the heft ol her purse. From among this gigantic list it 
ha« been no fool of a job to judiciously select the names of those most 
worthy to rank with the Wales-worshiped woman. But I have succeeded. 
I have here an array of female loveliness that ought to drive every dude 
on the Pacific i 'oast into dangerous lunacy; an array that ought to force 
the hair to grow on bald heads in twenty seconds. "As they pass in re- 
view before the reader's eye," he may spot the charmer— baaed on his 
Idiotic judgment— who shall be awarded the frosted cake : 

Miss Simper d' Ageucourt Jenkins— A pronounced blonde (sometimes 
pronounced strawberry blonde) ; heavenly blue eyes, one false ; wears 
carpet slippers, and stands five feet nine inches in her stocking feet. 
Has a record of twelve dishes of ice cream at one sitting. Never has 
been photographed. 

Miss Susan Slovenly— A true blonde ; natural complexion the color of 
cigar ashes; manufactured complexion, brilliant and dazzling in the ex- 
treme ; dotes on dudes ; pink eyes and imported hair. Plays poker and 
thumbs the guitar. Visible evenings. 

.Mrs. Jimpkins Colly — A queenly blonde ; a pumpkin complexion, in- 
clined to freckle in the Summer; hair done up in a wad ; lovely ears, 
but deaf as an adder. Has been photographed alive three times. Hus- 
band dead. 

Bliss Venus Silly — A roaring brunette, with ringlets of rarest raven 
hue; giggling eyes and a nose that turns up a la new moon ; regular 
cast-iron features and a rouge complexion; is under forty and speaks 
Chinook jargon fluently. Ornaments, diamonds (from Arizona). 

[ i Iwing to the fact that life is short, and the News Letter printers are 
merely human, we are compelled to cut this list off in the flower of its 
youth. Headers anxious to see the complete list will please call upon the 
T. C, any day between the hours of 1 and 6 a. m., and he will cheerfully 
entertain them.— Editors News Letter]. 

An amusing and at the same time instructive conversation was ace i 
dentally overheard by the T. C, one day this week. It was between two 
gentlemen, whose peculiar mode of torturing the English language proved 
them to be Irishmen of the class that is rudely (and we imagine falsely) 
accused of wearing " hair on their teeth." Said one: " Sure, Mick, and 
what will yez call the new baby?" "Arrah, be Jasus, Tim, but ye has 
me there. I was for calling him Patrick, but the ould woman says no." 
" And for why, in the name of all that's holy ? Sure, it's a dacent name 
enough." " Well, yer see, Tim, Bridget says that these Americans will 
never elect a Prisident wid the name of Patrick, and it would spoil the 
boy's chance." "Sure, Mick, but your ould woman has a long head 
ontiv her shoulders." 

I observe that the Sacramento Record-Union is unintentionally hu- 
morous. In its issue of July 12th it announced that the Ohio Democracy 
were " firing 100 puns in honor of Cleveland's nomination." On July 
14th it gravely stated that Captain Desmond (slain in the Cincinnati 
riot) "was killed by unknown persons in the mob." And on the 15th 
inst. it declared that J. G. Cotton, defaulting bank cashier of Newton, 
Iowa, recently arrested, was " traveling under the assumed name of Jay 
Gouge." I recommend the Record-Union as worthy to wear the mantle 
of the lamented Artemus Ward. 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes refuses to visit England, and gives his 
reasons thus tersely: " I have always dreaded the sea, and at my time of 
life I am not going to give up a passion I have cherished for so many 
years. I intend to die where I am." Oliver, old boy, shake. You have 
wit sufficient for a Court fool. I believe, with you, that it is better to be 
an "Autocrat of the Breakfast Table" than a puking passenger on an At- 
lantic scow. Let us both go and take a lemonade, Doctor. 

Three funeral processions passed me on Sunday, two of them being 
long lines of carriages, while the third was but a child's coffin, followed 
by one carriage. As the last wended its way slowly to the cemetery I 
heard a woman say " Is that all, only one carriage?" Yet, judging by 
the occupants of that one carriage, there was^more genuine, heartfelt sor- 
row over the little babe than there was among the laughing and smoking 
followers of the longer and more pompous pageantries. 

I suspect that Mrs. Henrietta Skelton, temperance lecturer, has been 
subsidized by Bismarck. In her recent lecture in this city she declares 
that "the climate of America is such that beer cannot be drank in such 
quantities here as in Germany." This is a statement that will arouse 
Americans to frenzy. If there shall be, in the near future, a stampede 
of my fellow-citizens to Germany, I will know that Mrs. Skelton is to 
blame. 

Mr, Walker Blaine, son of the Republican nominee, will assist his 
father during the campaign. By November 4th, Walker may, with pro- 
priety, be termed the "wise son," for by that time he will "know his 
own father " pretty thoroughly. 



People at the East are very much i t Lulu 1 1 unit, the 

This prodigy onn bold tfa 

placing one linger upon him. Wa do not Uriah l ilu, bnt 

ibe Is not the style of girl we should want to mate with. H one finger 

will do ail this, what ohanoe would her nnlortunata husband hate with 

eight ling. t* and their compliment of nail*'.' No I the, bare idea is alto- 
gether too shocking. 

I have an idea, and a g lone. That surplus of city funds is liable 

to ornate endless bickering* in the game of grab t bat i« going on for it, so 
1 have concluded to make a martyr "f myself and accept the whole of it. 
One-half I will magnanimously devote to cleansing the sewers and im- 
proving our drainage system, M 1 don't want the cholera. It, i* DOW in 
order tor the Soparvisors to move that it be paid in Oaafa to the T. C, 

The Republicans and Democrats might both take a Friendly bint, 
and. instead of wasting good firewood by unking bonfires ;>t the street 
corners which, by-tbe-by, the police should not permit they would be 
doing good and charitable service by giving it to the poor. There are 

many to whom it would be a boon, and some, at least, 01 the funds of the 
political parties would for once be well expended. 

An ovcr-rlpc paragraphor, who should be plucked, skinned and de 
\ Mined, informs the public that " the era of naturalness has at last begun 
with the feminine American foot." Being obtuse, I failed to catch his 
full meaning; bnt if the "era of naturalness" means that the Feminine 
foot is in frequent and vigorous juxtaposition with his anatomy, I beg to 
bellow my approval. 

Ex-Minister Sargent, I am happy to announce, learned one very im- 

fortant lesson while sojourning in the country of tho hurly Bismarck, 
Ce has informed a press correspondent of his intention, hereafter, to 
" mind his own business." Ninety-nine out of every hundred Americans 
ought to take a trip to Germany. The effect upon their manners would 
be gratifying iu the extreme. 

Mr. Cleveland is knocked into smithereens by John Swioton, who 
calls him " a scrubby numbskull." Mr. Blaine is demolished by the 
New York Times, which terms him "a shallow, Btupid American. " I 
feel like wiping off my chin when I think that one of these two candi- 
dates will iu all probability be President of the United States. 

Turk Street Market no longer leaves its filth on the sidewalks on Sun- 
days, but reeking odors are disgorged from a butcher's market in that 
vicinity, on Market street, where the carcasses are peimitted to hang 
over the sidewalk outside the closed shutters. The strong putrid essence 
that the dead exhale must be the preventive for sheep stealing. 

Charles H. Andrews, a delegate from Connecticut to the recent 
Democratic National Convention, has become a senseless lunatic. I 
am not apprised of the causes which brought about Mr. Andrews' 
pitiable condition, but I strongly suspect that he overheard the delibera- 
tions of the Platform Committee. 

The latest news, from a Sandwich Island paper, of Mr. Henry Hey- 
man, is that he is " preparing a treatise on royal palms, which he will 
publish in San Francisco on his return. He believes that a royal palm is 
better than a full hand, and only a degree inferior to a royal flush." 

" Making Away with a Husband " is the title of a sensational ar- 
ticle in a contemporary. Had it been the undertaker who made away 
with the unfortunate man, we should rejoice, but it was his adorable wife 
who "laid him out." Hence, as usual, we shed no tears. 

My latest request to the Kearney street jowler3 is that they will 
not Bquirt their tobacco juice and other vile secretions on the pavements 
in front of ladies when they meet them. What a pity the genus cannot 
comprehend how they are loathed. 

"Prof. Wiggins claims to have discovered a new moon." It is not 
stated how many millions of stars and meteors and comets and things he 
saw at the same time. We suspect he trod on a banana skin. 

A log cabin is being built at Washington for Joaquin Miller. The 
intelligence would have been more congenial to Califoruians had it stated 
that a coffin, instead of a log cabin, shrouded his remains. 

The latest intoxicating drink is Melon brandy. A Frenchman is said 
to have discovered it, and it is certain that at temperance picnics of the 
future there will be a great demand for watermelons. 

New Yorkers are greatly excited over a wonderful electric girl. After 
so long an experience with the electric belle, I am surprised that the 
Manhattans should be taken in by a galvanic, girl. 

The evils of this life are cheap. San Francisco daily papers sell for 
five cents each. The luxuries come high, however. I do not think Pixley 
could be bought for less than §100. 

The local Jewish journals are quarreling over the question of 
mixed marriages, and yet, to our knowledge, the editors are merry fel- 
lows in discussing mixed drinks. 

Dr. Zukertort plays chess while blindfolded. If he desires to amuse 
himself at the national game of Sao Francisco, stud-horse poker, it will 
be necessary for him to " see." 

The first shipment of watermelons was received in this city on last 
week. Extra grave-diggers have been engaged at all the cemeteries. 

There is a young lady on Van Ness Avenue so musical that she 
does all her sewing with a crochet needle. 

If a lady asks a dude to pass the butter at dinner he forthwith im 
agines she considers him a liand some man. 

Can a musical composer be accused of petty larceny or plagiarism 
when he steals a march ? 

A chord which is often vibrated upon in our divorce courts— Discord. 

Oscar Wilde's bride was not given away. She was "sold." 

Having a high old time— the thermometer. 

Warm Weather Fish.— Ice melts. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July IP, 1884. 



C P R R 

Time Schedul'e- Tn'esua y) July 1st, 1884, 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
8an Francisco as follows: 



LKAVE 
(lor) 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 

(from) 



8:00 a.m. 

a :00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
18:00 A.M. 
"9:30 A.M. 

3:30 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 
"4:00 p. M, 

8:00 A. M. 

3;00 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

7.00 p. m 

7:30 a.m. 
•3:30 P.M. 

7:30 A.M. 

4:00 p.m. 

3:30 p. m. 

7:30 a.m. 
"5:00 p.m. 
♦9:30 a.m. 

3.30 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 

3:30 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

7:30 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 

3:00 p.m. 
•5:00 P.M. 

3:00 p. M 

7:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:00 A.M. 

7:30 a.m. 

8:00 A. M 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
*4:00 p.m. 

7:30 A.M. 
t!0:00 A.M. 

3:00 P.M. 

8:00 A.M. 
'9:30 a.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

3:00 P.M. 

8:00 a.m. 

4:00 p m. 



. Byron and Martinez 



. Calistoga and Napa.. 
! Colfax V 



j Deming, El Paso ) Express... 

(and East f Emigrant 

i Gait and \ via Livermore. . . . 
) Stockton > via Martinez 

.lone 

. Knight's Landing 

.Los Angeles and South 

. Livermore and Pleasanton. . 

| Merced, Madera, ( 

( Fresno and Tulare ) 

. Maryeville and Chico 

( Mojave, Needles I Express . . 

j and East f Emigrant. 

.Niles and Hay wards.... ... . 



Ogden and I Express 

East fEmigrant 

Red Bluff tviaMar svilte, 
and Tehama I via Woodlaud. 

Kedding 

Sacramento via Livermore. 

*' via Benicia 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia... . 
Sacramento River Steamers. 
San Jose 



.Vallejo.. 



.Virginia City., 
.Woodland.... 



6:40 p.m , 

7:40 A.M. 
10:10 a.m. 
1f<"i:4Q P.M. 
12:10 p.m. 

9.10 A.M. 
*10:10A.M. 

0:40 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

7:40 A.M. 

9:10 A.M. 

6:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
♦12:10 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
10.10 a.m. 

9:10 A.M. 

5:40 P.M. 
*8:40a.m. 
"1-2:10 p.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

9:10 a m. 

6:10 a.m. 

6:40 p.m. 

3:40 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 
*S:40 A.M 

7:40 A.M. 

11:40 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

0:40 p.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

5:40 p.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

7:40 a.m. 
10:10 A.M. 
*6:00 a.m. 
*3:40 p.m. 
J3:40 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 

6:40 P.M 
'12:10 P.M. 

9:10 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

6:40 p.m. 
10:10 A.M. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 7:00 a. m. can meet 
Pacific Express from Ogden at Oakland Pier; and that 
leaving at 8:3(1 a. m. can meet Pacific Express from The 
Needles and El Paso at Oakland Pier. 

"^unda.vs excepted. JSundays only. 

TTDaily frmn Martinez. Sundays oi.ly from Byron. 



LOCAL TERRY TRAINS. 
From "SAN FRANCISCO." Daily. 



To EAST OAKLAND-«6:00, *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, »12:00. 

To FRUIT VALE— -6:00, <6:S0, *7:00, -?:30. "8:00, "S:30, 
•3:30, "4:00, «4:30, *5:00, *5:30, »6:00, "0:30. 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— «9:30, 6:30, (11:00, 
•12:00. 

To ALAMEDA— »6:00, »6:30, 7:00, »7:30, 8:00, «8:30, 9:00, 
9:30,10:00, (10:30. 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, (12:30, 1:00, 
(1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — "6:00, »6:30, 7:00, - 7:30, 8:00, "8:30, 
9:00, (9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 5:00, 6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— *6:00, «6:30, 7:00, "7:30, (8:00, 
-8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, "4:30, 
5:00, «5:30, 6:00, "6:30, 7:00. 



To "SAN FRANCISCO." Pally. 

Fkom FRUIT VALE-"6:23, "6:53, "7:23, "7:53, "8:23, 
"8:53, "9:23, "10:21, "4:23. "4:53, "5:23, "6:53, "6:23, 
•6:53,7:25, 9:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— "5:15, "5:45, (6:46, 
9:15, *3:16. 

From EAST OAKLAND-*6:30, *6:00. 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00,8:30, 9:00, 9:30,10:00,10:30,11:00, 11:30, 12:01 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30. 3:00. 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
6:30, S:u0, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY. Oaklakd -»5:37, *6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 
7:37,8:07,8:37, 9:07, 9:37, 10:07, 10:37, 11:07, 11:37, 12:07, 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 5:07, 
6:37, 6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:0d, 9:00, 10:00, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— »6:22, "5:52, "6:22, 6:52, "7:22, 7:52, 
•8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11:52, 
(12:22, 12:52, (1:22, 1:52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
5:22, 5:52, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:52. 

From BERKELEY-«6:16, *6:46, "6:15, 6:45, »7:15, 7:45, 
•8:16, 8:45, (9:15, 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:15, 5:45,6:16, 6:45, 
7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

From WEST BERKELEY— *5:45, »6:15, 6:45, «7:15, 
7:45, 8:45, (9:16, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45, 1:46, 2:45, 3:45, 
4:45, "5:15, 5:45, "6:15, 6:45, '7:16. 





Creefa 


Reate, 








From SAN 


FllANCISCO- 


-»7:15, 9:15 


, 11:16 


1:15 


3:15, 


5:16. 












From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:16, 10:15, 


12:15, 2:15, 4:15. 



"Sundays excepted. ^Sundays only^ 



" Standard Tine" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., San FranciBCO. 
A. IN. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 

COMMMENCING May 4, 1884, and until farther notice, 
Boats and Trains will leave from and arrive at San 
Francisco PasseDger Depot, MARKET-ST. WHARF, 
as follows: 



Leave S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



7:40 a. m. 
5:00 p. m. 
6:30 p. m. 



7:40 a. M. 
5:00 p. m. 



Sundays. 



8:00 a. i 
5:30 p j 



Destination. 



Petal u ma, 
Santa Rosa & 
Way Stations. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Arrive in S. F. 



Sundays 



9:10 A. M, 

i.i:45 p. m. 



Week 
Days. 



6:45 a. M. 
8:50 A M. 
6:10 p. m. 



8:50 a. m. 
6:10 p. m. 



7:40 a. m 


18:00 a m. 


Guerneville. 


|6:45 p. M.|6:10 p. M. 


Exc pt 


1 1 




1 1 


Satur- 


1 




1 s 


days. 




Donahue. 


1 1 


3:00 p. m. 


|8:20a. m.| 




|7:00p. m.| 10:00a.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sevastopol and Mark 
West Springs. At Clairville for Skaggs Springs, aiid at 
Cloverdale lor Highland Springs, KeTseyviHe, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Bartlett Springs, Ukiah. Eureka, Navarro 
Ridge, Mendocino City, Westport and the Geysers. 



EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturday to Monday, 
to Petaluma, SI 75 ; to Santa Rosa, S3 ; to Healdsburg, 
§4 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 

EXCURSION TICKETS good far Sundays only. -To 
Petaluma, SI 50 ; to Santa Rosa, S2 ; to Healdsburg, S3; 
to Cloverdale, S4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 



From San Francisco to Point Tihuron and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days-7:40 A. M., 9:20 A. M , 2:00 P. M-, 5:00 
p. m., 6:30 p m ; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 9:30 A. m., 12:00 M., 
2:30 p m , 5:30 p. m. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days-5:40 
A. M., 8:00 A. m., 10.30 A. M., 3:10 P. M., 5:10 P. M.; Sun- 
days; 8:10 A. M , 10:45 A. M., 1:10 p. M., 4:00 P. M., 
5:50 P. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days— 
6:10 A. m., 8:20 A. M., 10:50 A. M. 3:30 p. M., 5:33 p M.; 
Sundays S:35 A. M., 11:05 A. M. ( 1:30 P. M. ( 4:20 p. M., 
6:10- p. M. 



ARTHUR HUGHES. 

General Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



Saucelito— San Eafael— San Quentin, 

— VIA- 

NORTH PACIFIC COAST 

RAILROAD- 
TIME TABLE. 

Commencing Monday, 3£ay 12, 1884, and 
until further notice. Boats and Trains tuiil 
run as follotcs: 

For SAN RAFAEL and SAUCELITO (week days)- 
7:30, 9:15 A. M.; 1:30, 3:20, 4:50, 6:15 p. m. (Sundays)— 
8:00, 10:00, 11:30 a. m.; 1:30, 4:30, 6:30 P. m. 

From SAN RAFAEL(week days) -6:15, 7:45. 9:20 a. 
m; 2:00, 3:25, 4:50 p. m. (Sundays)— 7:55, 10:00,11:30 
A. M.; 3:16, 4:30,6:30 p. M. 



From SAUCELITO (week days)-6:45, 8:15, 10:00 a. 
m.; 2:30, 3:55, 5:30 P. M. (Sundavs) -8:30, 10:30 a. m.; 
12:00 M.; 3:45, 5:00, 7:10 p. m. 

Extra Trip --From Saucelito, on Saturday, at 7:00 p. M. 



7:30 A. W. ami 1:30 P. M. -Daily, Sundays 
excepted, THROUGH TRAINS for Duncan Mills and 
Way-Stations. (Through trains from Duncan Mills ar- 
rives in S. F. at 10:30 a m and 6:00 p. m.) 



Stage Connections. 

Stages leave Duncan Mills every morning except Mon- 
days, for Stewart's Point, Gualala, Point Arena, Cuffey's 
Cove, Navarro, Mendocino City, Caspar, Noyo, Kibe- 
sillah, Westport and all points on the north coast. 



Saturday to Monday Excursions. 

Excursion Tickets sold on Saturdays, good to return 
following Monday: Fairfax, $1; Camp Taylor, $2; Point 
Re>es, 82.50; Tomales, S3 50; Duncan Mills, S4. 



Snud»y Excursions. 

8:00 A.M. (Sundays only)— Excursion Train for 
Duncan Mills and Way-Stations. Returning, arrives in 
San Francisco at 7:40 p. m. 

Fares for Round Trip: Camp Taylor, Sl:75 ; Point 
Reyes, $2. Tomales, S2.50; Duncan Mills, $3. 

DAVID NYE, F. B. LATHAM, 

Gen'l Superintendent. Gen'I Pass, and Ticket Agent. 
GENERAL OFFICES, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



BROAD GAUGE. 



Summer Arrangement. 

Commencing Sunday, May 4, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend st., between 3d and 4th streets),as follows: 



leave * 

8. F. 



8:30 a.m. 
t9:30 a M, 
10:40 A.M. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:25 P.M. 
"5:15 p.m. 

6:30 p.m. 
Jll:45 p.m 



DESTINATION. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,. 
and Menlo Park 



* 8:10 a.m. 

i 9:03 a.m. 

>10:02am. 

3:36 p.m. 

t 4:59 p M. 
| 0:00 p.m. 
,t 7:50 p.m. 
! t 8:15 pm. 



8:30 a.m 
10:40 A.M 
*3:30p.m 

4:25 p.m. 



10:40 A.M 
\3:30 p.m 



10:40 am, 
; 3:30 p.m. 



10:40 A.M 
"3.30 p.m 



.Santa Clara, San Joseand., 
. .Principal Way Stations. . . 



9:03 a.m 
*'10:02 A.M. 
* 3:36 P.M. 

6:00 P.M. 
t 8:15 p.m. 



Gilroy, Pajuro, Castroville | -^10:02 A M. 
' 6.00 p.m. 



Gilroy, Paj;iro, Castroville ( ■* 
..Salinas and Monterey ... f 



Hollister and Tres Pinos 



■} 



Watsonville, Camp Goodall, \ 
Aptos, New Brighton, Soquel f 
(Camp Capitola) and Santa t 
Cruz ) 



'10:02 a.m. 
6:00 p m. 



'10:02 a M. 
6.00 p.m. 



10:40 a.m.I... Soledad and Way Stations... | 6:00 P.M. 

+ --m .,.11 ..Monterey and Santa Cruz.. ( \, ^.-- „ ,. 
t 7.50 A.M. 1 1 _ -(Su „ diy Excu r»imn) .. . . i jt 8-° 5 ■■■"■ 



♦Sundays excepted. tSundays only. JTheatre train 
Saturdays only. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, and PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS Stage 
via Santa Clara, which connect with 8:30 a. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS.-At Reduced 
Rates — to Monterey, Soquel, Santa Cruz and Pesca- 
dero; also to Gilroy, Paraiso and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

_ „ , , ( Sold Si'sdat Morning : good for 

For Sundays only, j Retun] „„, ( , ay 

For Saturday, ( Sold Saturday and Sunday only : 
Sunday and -J good for Return until followii g Mon- 
Monday (.day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip <,,,„ Sat to Round '1 rip s 
from San 5"? Mon. from San 



Francisco to 



San Bruno.. 
Millbrae .... 
Oak Grove. . 
San Mateo. 
Belmont.... 
Redwood.. .. 
Fair Oaks. . . 
Menlo Park 
Mayfield .... 



76 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 



! 50 
65 
90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Franci co to 



Mouut'nView 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 

San Jose 

Oilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
Monterey . . . 



1 50 
1 75 

1 75 

2 75 

3 00 



3 00 

3 l»i 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 



2 25 
2 50 
2 60 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUBAH, 

Superintendent Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

ES~ SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. "Ba 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Sciiedi'I,b. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

(Branch 8. F. and JV. P. E. R.) 

Boats and Trains Leave San Francisco as follows . 

3. /~"\ r\ p m., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
.yjKJ INGTON-STKEKT WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 



Sunday Excnrslons. 

8.QAi. m. (Sundavs only)', from WASHINGTON- 
.dL\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen ahd Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets : 
To Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, SI 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



A Woman's Heart.— Augustus: " Is it true, 
ma, that love takes away the appetite ? " Ma: 
'* It certainly does." " My worst fears are real- 
ized." " Why, my son, what is the matter ? ' 
"You know how deeply I — that is — how much 
I think of Miss Blank." "A charming girl, and 
I am glad you like her." " But she cannot have 
any love for me." " Why not?" " Because her 
appetite is not affected. Last night she took four 
plates of ice-cream." " Don't he alarmed, my 
soa : ice-cream don't count." 



July lit, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



i:i 



SINCE YOU HAVE GONE 
Siiiif y>'U have fQB«, Lost \.-\i; the early air 
I- not ihot through with r..*v -leant* tha' i 
Mv Iplrll with th«m in their Might; the win. I 
That kIIm iu the noonday leavea behin.l 
Ni» leafy footprinta fair t>> look upon 
Sin,*- y.m have gOTM. 

The availing U Dot BUed with tawtor light 
LQn t.> tin* bee of dying taint, when night 
Dmwi Mar; the moonbeam a rippling on the grnna 
Anil hifHftfl, in :» foam of flowefV. »!*■ ' 
Bnve faded into nhadown chill and wan 

Slnoe yon have gone, 
Tin- dnyi and eaaaona wither on their stem; 
Aini Lit--, thai atemed to shape a diadem 
Of joys fW my expectant brow, holds hack 
Her hand ; and now there st:tlk across my track 
Only the shades of days that might have Hhone 

Binee you have Roam 

— Richard Nixon, in Time*- Democrat, 

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND NOTES. 

The P. H S. S. City of Sydney arrived in the bay on last Monday, 

bringing tiles From the antipodes up to the 18th June.—*— A large lot of 

"exhausted" teas have bean seized by the Melbourne Customs authori- 
ties. —-Mr. Wiuiam EUgg, of the firm of McLean Bros., Ki-vr & Co., ia 
dead. He left an estate, valued at $185.000.***>*>*A hill to legalise Trades 
Unions ta pending before the Victorian Parliament.— *» An organized svs- 
tem of robbing the Melbourne Railroad Goods She :1s has just been dis- 
covered. It bad been in operatii'ii five years, and was conducted by means 
of a hidden entrance under the building. —A society has been organized 
in Melbourne to secure the opening of the Public Library and Museum 
On Sundays. The propriety of this step has been under discussion for the 
past twelve or fifteen years. As a result of receut earth tremors and 
subterraneous rumblings there has been a high tide at Flinders Island, 
Tasmania, and the general contour of Banks Straits has been altered. A 
re-snrvey and corrected charts will be necessary.^— A system of tram- 
ways, extending 1 over forty-nine miles and costing $4,538,030, is projected 
in Melbourne. Public processions ot the Salvation Army have been 
prohibited in Melbourne and suburbs,*^— The people of Melbourne are 
very much scared over the fact that there are large quantities of damaged 
dynamite stored in the hulks in the bay, which are liable to explode with 
but slight provocation ; also over the further fact that there are 80,000 
or 90.000 detonating caps, loaded with fulminate, scattered throughout 
the city, and liable, from the application of any undue degree of atmos- 
pheric heat, to explode at any moment. The Government of Victoria 
is considering the propriety of establishing a system of irrigation through- 
out the Colonies, and the importation of a California engineer, who has 
had a thorough experience in irrigation matters, is talked of. The Great 
Northern Railroad, X. S. W., is. to be opened from Armidale to Glen 
IunB next month. *^— A tin lode, two feet wide, has been struck near 
Deepwater, Northern New South Wales.— —Dr. Moran, the new Roman 
Catholic Archbishop of Sydney, is to be given a grand reception on his 
arrival next month.— —Last year 8,309 immigrants arrived in New South 
Wales from England. ——•The Municipal Government of Sydney is about 
to borrow money, in order to pave the principal streets of that city with 
wooden blocks. " — The railroad from Bundaberg to Mount Perry, Queens- 
land, has been opened. A company has been organized in Brisbane to 
build and operate a system of tram-cars.— —The first shipment of frozen 
meat from Brisbane to England has been dispatched. It consisted 
of 3,594 carcasses of mutton and 100 quarters of beef.— The South 
Brisbane Branch Railroad and the Brisbane Valley Railroad were opened 
this month.— Sir Julius Vogel has declined to enter the New Zealand 
Parliament.*^— There has been a gold rush to Linda, on the King River, 
Tasmania.— —A meeting of unemployed workingmen was recently held 
in Melbourne. The notorious Mr. C. E. Jones was among the Speakers. 
—Six thousand converts were made, by the Blue Ribbon Mission, in 
two weeks at Ballarat.— —A large quantity of axles and other material, 
imported by private firms for use on the Victorian Railroads, has been 
condemned.-^— There has been a run on the Melbourne office of the Lon- 
don Chartered Bank. It did not last very long.— A tricycle postal de- 
livery svstem is about to be tried in some of the country districts of Vic- 
toria. ^—Oysters, ranging in size from a five-cent piece to a well-developed 
bivalve, have reappeared in Western Port Bay, after an absence of a num- 
ber of years.— —An industrial iuactivity seems to prevail throughout all 
the Colonies.— Artesian water, in large quantities, has been discovered 
in the Gippsland District, Victoria, at a depth of 317 feet.— Mr. Sher- 
bonrne Sheppard, one of the oldest Victorian colonists, is dead. ^— A 
rich discovery of gold quartz has been made near Castlemaine, Victoria. 
— Hani an, the American oarsman, is being treated like a king every- 
where he goes. *^— Mr. Alfred Chenery, a well known and well-to-do col- 
onist of 41 years standing in Victoria, is dead. ■—■■It is proposed to or- 
ganize a cyclist corps, in connection with the Victorian Military Force. 
— ■ While great crowds of unemployed are howling for work in Mel- 
bourne, it seems that in the country districts laborers are very difficult to 
obtain. — "—Mr. Henry Palmer, who had been a resident of New South 
Wales for the past sixty years, is dead. ^— The Parliament of New 
Zealand has been opened, —The Albany and Beverly Railroad, West- 
ern Australia, is about to be built.— —The Government of South Aus- 
tralia is relieving a temporary glut in the labor market by actively prose- 
cuting useful public works. «^— It is announced that General Booth, lead- 
er of the Salvation Army, is about to visit the Colonies. The fell- 
mongers of Victoria are still urging the placing of an export duty on 
sheepskins. This is protection with a vengeance!— The returns show 
that during the past three months tbe mines of Victoria have produced 
181,011 oz. of gold. In the same colony, 864,056 acres of public land have 
been alienated during the past year to bonafide settlers.-^— Land in tbe 
center of Collins street (the principal thoroughfare), Melbourne, has sold 
for $4,100 per foot.— A combination was formed in the New Zealand 
Parliament, under the leadership of Sir George Gray, which ousted the 
Ministry. 

John Middleton— Coal- -14 Post at., and NE. cor. Geary and Mason. 



SOUTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 



agar Trains !«.-■ 



8 -Of") a. v tell) Alraradn, N,»«rk. Conimlllo. AlvUn, H.11U Clan 
■ ou JOSH, 1 ■ - Qal ... « rl 



1 "■•! ol « vi;m:i 8TRI 1 1, Mil in ,11. 1,, ,. 
A»rk. Omtnrlllo. ArrtK. Hanu Clara. 8AN 

, SAN I A c'lll Z 
mill nil U r. St bUOUl !■ ,ii. I 

O-JIO i' » (anon 9uwU)X Bxpraa HI Man.AJfando, rTawaifc. Oantn 
■^ J '~' fin*. Uvlao, ,„,j „u 

Stations la SANTA CRUZ. Parlor 0*r. 

A'£50 '• "■ ,l; " lv '"' S ^ N ■" lsl ■ I : Intanaadlali 

~T ,C -^ Baturdav8 and Son tCrw. 

cfc o EXCURSIONS I.. SANTA URUZ and H'-i no to BAH JOSE an SATURDAYS 

'+"-' and 81 NDAYS. to return until MONDAY, Im Iu Iv. 

SOD * »■— BVERY 8UNDAY, EXCURSION ta BAN J08B, BIO TREKS 

ov - M -' .mil s\nta (III z 
83 to 1% Trues and Santa Cruz; 81 7* to Santa Clara and s.m J. mo. 

TO OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA. 

f 0:00 - Si'.::iu S7:im -7: '.'> s:i)O-8:80-9:00-0:3O-10:O0-10:3O-ll:O0-ll:3O A. u. 

«il-J:iHi-l2::ln- «,1:iki-I::: i ■::»" '^::l0-3:00-:i:3O- i 1:80 5:00 ..;.n-8:00— 

6:80— 7:00-7:80-8:30— 10:46— ll:« r. ». 

Ft FOURTEENTH AND WBB8T8B STREETS. OAKLAND: t5:3O-ffl:0O - 

»-8:00-8:30-»:00_:i:'<ii 10100—10:81 ", 1 1 11:80 i « <J14:00 

— 12:30 * l 1:80 8:00 2:SU — 8:00-8:80 1:00-4:30—6:00 6:30 8:00—0:80— 

7:00-7:30-0:30-10:15-11:45 p. M 

Fr 111(111 STREET, U.AMKDA: §5:10-56:111 511:111 8:40-7:18 7:10-8:10- 

8:40 — 9:ie 9:48- -ajio:48— 11:18 fll548a.». 18:16-119:48—1:16 1:48 

2:18-8:48 8:16-8:48—4:18-4:48 6:18 5:46 6:18—8:46 7:16 9:18 -11:81 P. M. 
(SttodnyB excepted. fJSaturdaya and Bundaya only. 

TICK ET. Telegraph and Transfer Office, 222 HI INTUOMKRY ST., San 1 , 

L, Fl ELMORE, Superintendent. R. H. QAKRATT, G. K. and P. Agent. 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Jtcjtrt'Hrnted hy: 

AGENCY OF AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

32 RrVER STREET, Flavel's Warehouse, 

Chicago, Illinois. Astoria, Oregon, 

MR. EUGENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, 
LONDON, E. C. 

San Francisco and Ne"*v Yoi*lc. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 



NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 



[Jan. 11] 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



W. H. DlHOND. 



H. B. Williams. A. CiiKHKBitouaii. 

WILLIAMS, DIM0ND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of Clippers/' 
from New York and Boston, and " The Hawaiian Line." March 22. 



C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants. 

8A.N FRANCISCO and NEW YORK. 

62?" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, comer of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jan. 17. 

THOMAS PRICE, 

CHEMICAL L ABOR A T O R Y, 

Assay Office. Bullion Booms and Ore Floors. 

Hz%T Coin Returns on all Bullion Deposits in 24 Sours. 

Car ful Analysis made of Waterd, Imlustriul Products, etc. Mines examined and 
reported upon. Consultations on O.es, Metals, Chemical and Metallurgical subjects. 

524 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No. 310 Sansome Street. 

San F iian ci bco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN EUR8 t 

[September 21.1 

GILBERT & MOORE. 

FURNITURE AND CARPETS 

ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN. 
IS and SO SUTTER STREET San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTORY— 550 to 572 Brannan street. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Oold Medal, Paris, 1878. 

Sold by all Stationers. Sole Agent for tbe Ilil«iI States, 
MR. HENRY HUE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 

BOZO RAD0VICH, 

Importer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Fine Wines and Liquors, 

UO deary street, Sun Francisco. 



California Wines for Family use a specialty. 



May 3. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1884. 



THE ATTEMPT TO STEAL OUR REDWOODS. 
Will the California Redwood Company, by a liberal use of money, 
be : ble to subvert the United States laws and perfect their steal of 90,000 
acres of the best and only large tract of timber land which remains to-day 
in our State ? Or will the Scotch and English stockholders lose the mill- 
ions they have invested through confidence in the firm name of Falkner, 
Bell & Co.? They must be aware that the moneys deposited with our 
Government will never be returned should the fraud be proven. Every 
dollar of it will be confiscated. We ask our foreign Rubscribers, who are 
directly or indirectly interested, to read carefully what follows, and to 
form their own opinion. We present for their information facts that are 
indisputable, gleaned from the original document which procured a sus- 
pension of further patent issues for the time being, and we have no hesi- 
tation in predicting that when they see the matter thus clearly set before 
them, they will approve of our course of action and realize the motive for 
the low aspersions made against this paper by a member of the firm 
which has engineered the scheme from the beginning. For our part we 
pay as much attention to the remarks of men who are willing and eager 
to buy perjurers for the sake of personal gain, as we do to the yelp of the 
poodle dog which, masquerading in an editorial collar, attempts to defend 
such actions purely for the sake of cur-like enmity, and without, as he 
states himself, a knowledge of the facts of the case. In presenting the fol- 
lowing statement we are not actuated by a malicious spirit. We believed 
from the first we were in the right, and we believe in the end we will be 
sustained by the community at large. 

In an open letter to the Secretary of the Interior, dated June 5, 1884, 
Mr. Kobert Gardner, ex-Snrveyor-General of this State, and at one time 
Registrar of Humboldt county, protests strongly against the issuance of 
the 500 patents demanded by the California Redwood Company and their 
promoters, J. D. Walker, of Falkner, Bell & Co., C. H. King and Divid 
Evans, on the ground that the entries were fraudulent and in violation of 
the United States laws for the disposal of timber lands, which he quotes 
as follows : 

The conditions of the Act of Congress of June 3, 1883, are : " That 
the land shall be valuable chiefly for timber, but unfit for cultivation ; 
that no one person or association shall be permitted to enter more than 
1G0 acreB ; that the entry shall not be made for speculation, nor for the benefit 
of an if other person than the party making the entry. The applicant is re- 
quired to swear, among other things, that he has made no contract or 
agreement by which the title he may receive from the United States shall 
inure, in whole or part, to the benefit of any person except himself." 

H.e then goes on to state how these provisions have been evaded in Hum- 
boldt county by a few unprincipled men, who have attempted "to sub- 
vert an Act of Congress and enter 90,000 acre3 of timber land in one body, 
when the law specifically declares that each person shall be restricted to 
160 acres ' in good faith to appropriate it to his own exclusive use and benefit. 7 " 
The gist of his statement is as follows: 

In 18S3, 89,590 acres were illegally entered by persons hired for the purpose 
and by them transferred to one David Evans, who, in turn, deeded them 
over to the President of the California Redwood Company. This land, which 
lies in Townships 7 and 8 N., Range 2 E., and Townships 9, 10, 11, 12 
W., Range 1 and 2 E., and Township 13 N., Range H. M., is a solid tract 
of timber land 2 to 7 miles wide, and 40 miles long, in all about 150 square 
miles. The school sections are included, being purchased from the State 
by dummy applications filled by an attorney (a relative of one of the 
parties under indictment for perjury) in the interest of the grabbers. 
Unusual facilities were granted by U. S. Surveyor-General Brown in 
corresponding with this attorney. Hired men were always on hand when 
the necessary paper arrived. " It was only necessarv," the writer jocosely 
remarks, for Beach and Marks to open their canal in the rear of Gorham 
Barnum's saloon, and make a drive to the Land Office, when ordered to 
do so by David Evans." On one day 25 men appeared before the Regis- 
ter to make affidavit with papers already prepared. On another day 80 
men appeared before the same official within two hours of the receipt of 
the papers, And again, a few days later, 76 hired men appeared and 
made affidavits before 10 a. M. 

This lively business awoke the citizens of Humboldt county. They 
filed a protest and demanded an investigation to the end that all these 
500 entries might be canceled. A special agent named Smith was sent 
out from Washington, and on a partial report all the entries were sus- 
pended, pending further investigation. This, however, strange to say, 
ended the matter. On receipt of the report the agent was furloughed, 
and there has been no further investigation. 

The Secretary's attention is directed to the fact that the indictments by 
the Grand Jury against Evans, Marks and Beach, for perjury, have no 
connectiou with the restoration of the land to the public domain. That 
the patents demanded for these 500 illegal timber entries by the Califor- 
nia Redwood Co., together with its principal promoters— J. D. Walker, 
a member of the firm of Falkner, Bell & Co., King and Evans — will, if 
issued, be protected behind a late decision of Judge Sawyer, in which he 
held that, after a patent is issued by the Land Department, the United 
States having received all it asked for the land, could not allege damage 
or loss." 

In closing, the writer severely criticizes the methods of F. W. Bell, the 
Notary before whom the deeds were acknowledged, and states that the 
correctness of his record as to date can be destroyed by indisputable evi- 
dence. Suspicion attaches to the movements of the Government agents 
in practically suspending all further investigation, and also to circum- 
stances which would indicate that unusual influences are at work in the 
Land Department of the Government to perfect the steal. 

The letter closes with an urgent appeal to the Secretary to do his duty, 
and his attention is directed to the following affidavit. This document 
speaks for itself. It is only one of twenty-five or thirty similar protests 
which hang in the Commissioners' office. In the face of such overwhelming 
proofs of conspiracy and fraud, can any doubt exist as to the action of 
the Government? In comm m with the people of California, we have the 
greatest confidence in the honesty of Secretary Teller, and have no fear 
that he will let the interest of our State go by default to serve the ends 
of a thieving ring: 

The McLAtTGiuAK Affidavit. 

In the matter of the alleged fraudulent timber land entries in the Humboldt Land 
District under act of June 3, IS7S, Frank McLaughlan, being duly sworn, deposes 
and says: That some time in November, 1882, he made an agreement with Charles 
Beach, of Humboldt County, California, to furnish men to make Limber applications 



at $5 per man- -agreeing to pav the applicant the sum of 830 on the entry— that un- 
der said agreement he (the affiant) procured f mrteen me to make entries, to wit: 

Thomas 0. Persons, N. E. £ of N. E £, 8. A, N. E. £ and S. E. £, section 14, town- 
ship 10 V., range I E. 

Norman Howard, S E £ section 10, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

Charles H Walker, S. W. £ section 20, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Herman C. Miller, N. W £ section 26, township 9 N., range 2 13. 

Thomas McGinn, lots 1, 2 and 3, and S. E. £ N. E. £ section C, township 9 N., 
range 2 E. 

William Morgan, S. I S. W. \ section 9, and E. J S. E. J section 8, township :0 N., 
range 1 E. 

Frank Stevenson, N. W. £ section 22, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Frank Baker, S. W. £ section 9, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

George Elbra, N. E. £ section 3, township 9 N , range 2 E. 

James A. Clayson, S. E. £ section 8, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

John W*. Elbra, S. W. £ section 10, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

Stilting H. Joy, S. E. \ section 9, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

William Grady, S. W. £ section s, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

That subsequent to procuring the above names the said Beach employed this affi- 
ant for one week, for the sum of $20 as compensation, for procuring men to make 
entries; during the time thus employed this affiant spoke to and brought forward 
the following persons, to-wit: 

Benjamin Baeman, W. £ S. E. £ section 2. and W. £ N. E. £ section 11, township 
10 N., range 1 E. 

Thomas E. Mcltenna, N. W. £ section 13. township 10 N., range I E. 

Peter Hurmaner, N. W. £ section 27, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

Richard D. Swift, lots 1 and 2, S. .J N. E. £, section 1, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

Jeremiah Duffy, S. } S. E. i N. E. £ S. E. J, section 3, N. W. £ of S. W. £, section 
2, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

William Ross, S. E. £ of S. W. £, S. £ S. E. £, N. E. £ of S. E. £, section 34, town- 
ship 11 N. range 1 E. 

James T. Wood, S. W. £ section 24, township 10 N, range 1 F. 

Henry T. Peterson, S. E. £ section 32, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

L. P. Schuster, N. W. £ section 9, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

W. J. O'Dounell, N. E. J section 15, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Charles F. Flynn, S. E. £ section 24, township 10 N., range 1 E. 

Oscar A. Homer, N. W. £ of S. E £, S J, S. E. £, section 29, N. E. £, section 32, 
township 10 N., rangel E. 

John Silva, S. W. £ section 32, township 7 N., range 2 E 

David Weldon, in Section 34, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

Edwin A Brock, S. E. £ section n, township 9 N., range 1 E, 

Honest E. Haskins, N. W. A section 4, township 1 N., rangel E. 

Thomas O'Donald, N. E. £ section 26, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Winfred Dean, lots 3 and 4, E. A, 8. W. £ section 18, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Franklin W. Haines, S. W. £ section 20, township 9 N,, range 2 E. 

Roswell B. Welsh, S. E. \ section 5, township 9 N., raugt 2 E. 

Wilfred J. Johnson, N. E. £ section 34, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

George R. Gorham, N. W. £ section 27, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

John C. Thurston, S. W. £ section 27, township 9 N., range 2 E. 

Adsor Felanta (Savantor Nelson), S. £, N. E. £, S. £, N. W. £, section 12, township 

10 N., range 1 E. 

John Silva, E. A, N. E. £, E. A, S. E. £, section 30, township 7 N., range 2 E. 
Aolphus Harmon, S A;, S. W, £, lots 3 and 4, section 2, township 9 N., range 2 E , 
and lots 3 and 4, section 2, township 8 N., range 2 E. 
Thomas Bennett, N. E. £ section 24, township 9 N., range 1 E. 
Gustavus E. Wanrich, S. E. £ section 15, township 15, range 1 E. 
John E. Johnson, S. W. £ section 15, township 8 N., range 1 E. 
James. A. Archer, S. E. £ section 20, township 9 N., range 2 E. 
Wesley Dean, SO acres section 35, township 11 N,, range 1 E. 
Wesley Dean, W, £, S. E. £, section 9, township 9 N., range 2 E. 
James B. Cnristopher, N. E. £, section 26, township 7 N., range 2 E, 
Edgar B. Dresse , N. W. £ section 23, township 7 N. , range 2 E. 
Fred. McFarland (160 acres in), section 32, township 11 N, range 2 E. 
Wm Stebbins (160 acres in), section 29, township 11 N., range 2 E. 
Daniel Cling (160 acres in), section 32, township 11 N., range 2 E. 
John L. Sweet (1U0 acres in), section 32, township 11 N., range 2 E. 
Michael Mulligan, S. E. £, section 0, township 11 N., range 2 E. 
Wm. T Pine, S. E. £, section 1, township 11 N., range 1 E. 
G. R. Lawson, S. E. £, section 7, Township 11 N., range 2 E. 
Fred Grant, lots 3and 4, S. E. £, S. W. J, S. W. £ of N. W. £, section 1, township 

11 N., rangel E. 

Emery Littrell, N. E. £, section 19, township 11 N., range 2 E. 

Herman Harting, N. E, £, section 18, township 11 N., rauge 2 E. 

Benj. F. Tihbets, S. E. £, section 15, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

James M. Morrison, N. E. £, section 13, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

John Kellan. S. E. £, section 12, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

Otto Johnson, S. W. £ section 12, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

John Elliott, N. W. £ section 12, township 11 N., range 1 E 

C. C. Fairfield, S. E. £, section 19, township 11 N., range 2 E. 

Archer McKendry, N. W. £, section 10, township 11 N , range 1 E. 

Wm. Carter, S. W. £, section 24, township 11 N-, range 1 E. 

James Whiting (160 acres in), section 18, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

Robert C. Soper, N. W. J, section 15, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

John Clancy, lot 3, S. E. £, N. W. £, E. £, S. W. £, section 3, township 11 N., 
range 1 E, 

John Love, S. E. £, section 3, townshipll N., range 1 E. 

Eugene Brock, N. W. £, section 22, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

Joseph L. Mar3h (160 acres), section 21, township 11 N., rangel E. 

Jessie F. Tibbets, N. W. £, section 29, township 10 N. range 2 E. 

Edward Mathews, 3 E. J, S. W. £, section 30, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

Edward J . Stoppleton, lots 3 and 4, E. A, S. W. £, section 7, township 10 N., 
range 2 E. 

Henry Lacv (160 acres), section 31, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

Dennis Halloran, S. W. £, N. W. £, W. £, S. E. £, N. E. £, section 7, township 10 
N-, range 2 E. 

W. J. Foley, N. E. £, section 23, township 11 N„ range 1 E. 

John J. Sullivan, S. E £, section 30, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

W. J. Ryan, S. E. £, section 18, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

Hannibal S. Soule, N. E. £, section 30, township 10 N., range 2 E. 

John Hemps hell, S. E. £, section 31, township 11 N., range 2 E. 

John McXenna, N. E. £, section 31, township 11 N., range 2 E. 

Hans T. Marsh, S. E. £, section 26, township 11 N-, range 1 E. 

John E. Heustis, N. E. £, section 25, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

Thomas L Gregory, S. E. J. section 10, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

James A. Ferns. S E. £, section 23, township 11 N., range 1 E. 

Frank H Whitmore, S. E. £, section 9, township 7 N., range 2 E. 

And some 20 to 25 others who made entries on township 7 N., range 2 E., H. M. 

This affiant cannot state of his own knowledge whether all the above-named per- 
sons completed the entries or not. 

This affiant further states that he procured some 40 men who made application to 
enter in township 12 N-, range 1 E., which said entries are not completed, because 
of certain mineral affidavits, as this affiant is informed. 

This affiant would further show that all the applications in township 12 N., range 
1 E —all the above list and also mauyothers -were made outand signed in the back- 
room of Gorham Barnum's saloon in Eureka. The most of the writing was done by 
Charles E. Beach, ML P. Roberts and Harry A. Marks, and acknowledged before F. 
W. Bell, Notary Public. 

This affiant is not informed as to who furnished the money to make said entries, 
but knows to a great extent it came from the office of J. Russ & Co. 

This affiant does know that the men employed to make said entries did not make 
the payment for the land, and had no interest therein beyond the stipulated price 



July 111, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



■ 
DXpmd Ud tb« Unit ftfUMnWTW] 

N K. |. N. K \. N K ]. ■ 
Q, tanrnthJplON., nuv« 1 B.,forwtil< Chariot 

.• vhteh tmiv bi hlch ii unknown 

I thla wu 
ton with all who old by Beach to Inform ti >■ 

r thai hi- would bring In tin entrant money, or would wntl »nn 

■ . . ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

r.' parmlttan to handle. In* money, rtila nmatit mat*- ol !ii- own knowledge 
that nearlv aJI Um Umbar hunta In toe Humboldt Lund District were entered In the 
uuninT aboi r J aae ri bed. 

[Sh/ntxi] Frank McLArailLAN. 

Count] .'f Humboldt, w. 
Bworn aii.l nihMrlbad to before me this August 1,1883. 

W. T. Smith, Special Agent 

We publish this lengthy statement of facti for the benefit of our sub- 
■criben En England ami Scotland, and in it we have copied largely from 
two of our leading: San Francisco dailies, which have already denounced 
the whole scheme as a gross fraud. It is a dirty business from the begin- 
ning, ami will eud disastrously to one party or the other. Should the 
patents issue, the people of California will be robbed in a barefaced man- 
ner. Should they not issue, investors on the other side, who have been 
perhaps a little hasty, will be out and injured. Certainly, so long as 
Secretin Teller remains in office these frauds cannot lie perpetrated. 
Henry Dalbala Harrison, of Falkuer, Itell & Co., will have to adopt 
some other method of reply to our statements than calling names like an 
overgrown Bchoolnoy, before he will succeed in convincing the folks in 
Lonaon and Glasgow that he is an injured innocent. We do not over- 
look some harmless attempts at bulldozing since his arrival here, but re- 
serve comment thereon for the future, when it is necessary. Referring 
lo ft short letter published on the 4th of last April in the London Finan- 
rial and Hitting item, we direct his attention to its contents. In it he 
was vituperative, actually giving the world to understand we were telling 
falsehoods. Xow we publish the same article today at greater length, 
aud we challenge Mr. Harrison, who is now in this city, to deny a single 
statement contained therein. There can be no backdown now, Henry — 
yon must face the music or go in for the baby act again, 

( >ne of the plausible arguments set forth to sooth the minds of timorous 
stockholders, is this : That leading attorneys of this city have passed the 
title as perfect. This is simply unmitigated bosh. Attorneys merely 
deal with the face of papers, without doubt perfectly correct in form 
and execution. Thej' are not paid to rake up skeletons, nor is it their 
province to suggest or impure into possible frauds. 

The farcical view of the whole business we reserve, on account of the 
length of this article, for another occasion. We refer to the examination 
of the property by the experts Menzies aud Blythe, who have to report to 
the stockholders in Great Britain. We wonder if this is the same Mr. 
Menzies who is connected with some savings banks and money-loaning 
institutions in Scotland ? 

It would appear, from the statements of Gardner and others, that 
Falkner, Bell & Co. were the original promoters of this scheme, through 
the agents, Evans, Streeten and others. Certain it is, that through their 
agency the shares were foisted on English stockholders, the firm receiving 
a large commission. This will probably be another lesson to English 
investors. 



Rats, it is said, will desert a rotten ship. We wonder if this is why a 
a partner in a leading English house is about to withdraw from the firm. 

Motto for Scotch Investors In Foreign Securities -" Put not your 
trust in merchant princes." 

CLUB LIFE IN SAN FRANCISCO.— No. 7. 

There Is a very general demand for a purification of club life. We 
are glad to know that the better class of members agree with the senti- 
ments expressed by the News Letter, and are slowly and cautiously 
feeling their way to a remedy. The grave question is how to get rid of 
objectionable members — men who insist upon maintaining all the acces- 
sories to fastness peculiar to their earlier experience. The majority in 
most clubs are, to use a canting phrase, called "Latter Day Saints." 
They are sneered at and snubbed, but they are in a majority for all that. 
They are powerful enough to vote down evil if they only had the courage. 
Let them take heart of grace, meet together and say that their club shall 
no longer be an institution to which it is a disgrace for a gentleman to be- 
long. It is within the right of the majority in every institution to insist 
upon control. It has the right to govern. It may get rid of whom it 
pleases. It can have but little trouble in getting rid of the old topers, 
gamblers and fast men. An intimation that a resolution will be passed to 
expel them would be enough. Not one of them would dare take his case 
before the blaze of public opinion. He would know that the feeling 
would be against him. He would be sensible that he would be the sub- 
ject of contempt aud ridir-ule. He would know that a man is never ex- 
pelled from his club without good reason, and he, more than any one else, 
would shrink from a public expose* as to the facts. Moreover, a man 
with whom a majority of his fellow members no longer desired to associ- 
ate, would feel that the sooner he was down and out the better. 

In view of all these considerations we say that nothing is easier than to 
get rid of objectionable club members. They will go of their own accord 
the moment it is made plain to them that the majority are in earnest. 
That is it exactly. Earnestness is what is wanted. A serious determina- 
tion to do what is right, though the heavens fall, would soon cure the 
morale and elevate the status of our clubs. 

If it should fail — as we are very sure it would not — then let the re- 
forming majority inaugurate new institutions founded upon rules that 
would be a guarantee of their good character for all time to come. A 
club should be a place where gentlemen should feel secure in meeting 
gentlemen as gentlemen ought to be met. Nobody can say that certain 
of our clubs are that to-day. They are far from being what they ought 
to be, and that fact is only too well known. We have heretofore spoken 
in general terms for their benefit. We know that the good seed has 
fallen upon the hearts of the better class of members. We hope it will 
fructify and bring forth fruit, in which case our mission is ended. 

The giraffe has a tongue seventeen inches long — that is, the male gi- 
raffe has. What must be the length of the tongue of the lady giraffe ? 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

'ptir « »m|iiiuy-* MWMaera Hill •.nil lor II •"■ _ I. •• ., _ . \i.i 

1 rOROB ui \, u follow.: 

CITY OF PBKDia POIT 1Mb, 1.1 11 o'clock » 

Bxeojrdoii Ttckati to xokolwnu and rotun 

for .>ch York, vl» Pniimuni 

COMMA W OOTI 1st, lit 1" o'olOC* *. y., 

Taking faighl Mid pusengcra I r MA7.vn.AN, AOAPULCO, OHAVPBIUCO, s.\N 
JOSKOK i:ai ii.mm.a. UJAJCTLA, I.A LI BEET AD ud PDNTA AUENA8, 

For Honolulu, Anekl.ad mo, I Nytlueyt 
CITY Of SYDNEY SATURDAY, VD01 BT M,tl 18 o'clock »., 

Or ImmctlUiU'Ij <m arrival of the Em^'HhIi mails. 

Tt-n Dollars additional is chanced lor Upper Cabin piuwage. 

For freight or passage apply at tile olflce, cur. First and Hrannan BtrcoU. 

[July l'J.j WILLIAMS. DIMOND 4 CO., General Aironts. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

For Japnn mill I'hliiR. I.pnve Wlinrf Corner FlrNt hiiiI 
BRANNAN STREETS at 12 o'eloek noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONG- 
KONG, connecting at Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai: 

OCEANIC AUGUST 7ih 

ARABIC AUGUST loth 

SAN PABLO CAPT. REED 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at Reduced Rates, 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on aalo at C. P. R. R. Co.'s 
General Office, Room 74, cor. Foartb aud Towusend ata. 
For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the PaciOc Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. July 19. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

Tbe Oregon Railway and Xavijtr»tion Company aud Pacific 
Coaa Steamship Company will dispatch from Spear-street Wharf, for the 
above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, via.: COLUMBIA, STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA aud OREGON. 

Sailing* Days; 
JULY 3-8-13-18-23-28, AUGUST 2, and every following Five 

Bays, at 10 o'clock a. m.. 
Connecting: at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
[July 5.J No. 10 Market street San FranciBCO. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of tbls Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
as follows : 
For Victoria, B. C, and Puget Sound Ports: 10 a. m., JULY 2d, 10th, 18th. 2oth, 
and AUGUST 3d, and every eighth day thereafter. The fiist steamer of the month 
connects at Port Townsend with steamer " Idaho" for Alaska. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the 0. R. and N. Co.: Every five days. 
For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obiepo, 
Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Huenome, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, excepting San Diego, every fifth day a. m. 
For Eureka, Areata, and Hookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, at 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday, at 3 p. m. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., General Agents, 
[July 12.] No. 10 Market street. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOR HONOLULir.-The spleudld new 3000-ton Steamships 
will leave the Company's wharf, corner of Stcuart and Harrison streets: 

MAKIPOSA FRIDAY, AUGUST 1st 

ALAMEDA FRIDAY, AUGUST 15th 

AT 3 P. M. 
EXCURSION TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
For further particulars apply to 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents, 
[July 19.] 827 Market St., corner Fremont. 

SKIN DISEASES CURED IN A FEW DAYS.— SULPHOLINE LOTION Re- 
moves Eruptions, Pimples, Redness, Blotches, Scurf, in a few days. Is highly 
successful in Eczema, Psoriasis, Prurigo, Tetter, etc. It totally destroys many deep- 
seated, inveterate skin affections. Most agreeable to use. In Great Britain SUL- 
PHOLINE is the one Skin Remedy. 

SULPHOL1NE LOTION.-ANY ONE, HOWEVER DEEPLY AND APPAR- 
ently hopelessly afflicted with Skin Disease, should apply SULPHOLINE as 
quickly as possible. In two or three days the effect will become evident in a dimin- 
ished appearanoe of the malady, a growing tendency to fade away, and complete 
obliteration of the eruption. Sold everywhere by chemists, etc. 

SULPHOLINE LOTION.— AS A REMEDY FOR PIMPLES, BLOTCHES, RED- 
ness, Rashes, Blemishes, Spots, Roughness, Discoloration, Eczema, Rosea, Pi- 
tyriasis, Prickly Heat, Salt Rheum, Scurf and General Irritability of the Skin, SUL- 
PHOLINE acts like a marvel. None of these eruptions can withstand it. The 
LOTION attacks them all by some depurative action, and brings the skin out clear 
and healthy. SULPHOLINE is beautifully fragrant. Made only by JOHN PEPPER 
&CO., London, England. 

Sold "by WAKELEE & CO., Montgomery and Bush streets, 
San Francisco. 

LIVER PILLS. -DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS. THE GREAT ENGLISH MED- 
ieine. Est ablished 70 years. 

LIVER PILLS.— DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS, CONTAINING DANDELION 
and Quinine, without Mercury, are far above all others aB the surest, mildest 
and best means of removing obstructions and irregularities of the Liver and Stom- 
ach, Headache, Biliousness, Shoulder Pains, Indigestion, Consti) ation, Flatulence, 
Torpidity, so insuring perfect health. DR. KING'S PILLS are sold everywhere. 
Mept byWAKELtE & CO., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 19, 1884. 



PASSING REMARKS. 
French law recognizes property in faces. The painter Jacquet, who, 
to revenge himself on Alexander Dumas, saw fit to reproduce the great 
writer's features, in the central figure of a genre picture, entitled " The 
Jew of Bagdad," has been mulcted in heavy damages. Toward the end 
of the Second Empire, cartoon periodicals were in a flourishing condition. 
There was a long list of these humorous journals, the most prominent of 
which was The Moon, with Gill as its caricaturist. Gill was a genius. He 
subsequently became insane, and died, recently, a mental wreck. The 
Moon was a daily. It was a two-page affair, with a colored cartoon on 
the frontispiece. Prominent persons of all classes were its subjects, and 
the caricatures were marvels of humorous ingenuity within truly artistic 
bounds. Some of the subjects very naturally objected, and The Moon was 
sued for libel and forced to suspend. A law was then passed, making the 
publication of a personal caricature dependent upon a formal permission 
in writing by the subject — the permission to form part of the cartoon. 
The Moon then re-appeared, its title changed, by a typical bit of French 
humor, to The Eclipse. The absurdity of the law will be apparent to us 
Americans ; it was not to the French, who failed to perceive the ludicrous 
anomaly of a caricature, satirizing — often in a brutal manner — a person's 
foibles, spread broadcast over the land, with a facsimile authorization at- 
tached. In case any selected victim refused the necessary permission, 
The Eclipse was printed with an unfinished cartoon, the features omitted, 
and the fact of the refusal announced. This simply held up the personage 

in question to still greater ridicule. 

* * * * * 

Thelarge red political banner flung to the breeze by amorning contemporary 
should be hauled in, and the journal's partisan enthusiasm indicated by 
waving bunting of some other color. As the case stands, an auction is 
suggested to every passer-by, with differences of opinion as to whether 
the newspaper or its candidates— whose names stand boldly forth on the 
banner in question — are to be sold out. There is a basis for humorous 
scribbling in this, with variations on a possible substitution of blue bunt- 
ing for red. I offer it freely to any one willing to work the thing out. 
No charge. 

The coming Presidential election will, in a measure, test the political 
power of the press. The most prominent New York journals are op- 
posed to Blaine; the leading papers of Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Chicago and Cincinnati, and those of many other smaller cities, are ar- 
rayed against the Republican nominees, and no less than twenty-five Ger- 
man papers in Ohio have commenced a bitter tight against Jim and Jack. 
The result in November will indicate if there is such a thing as a posi- 
tive influence of the press, in a question in which men are guided princi- 
pally, if not wholly, by sympathies. If men were controlled in their use 
uf the ballot by reason and common sense, and were open to argument, 
there could be no doubt as to the power of the press to influence them. 
Mingled with all the personal abuse, bitter vituperation and general mud- 
slinging, which are the regrettable characteristics of partisan journalistic 
controversy in the United States, there is much serious argument and 
sensible collation of pro and con. evidence. Unfortunately, these plead- 
ings have weight with but the few, and, to the many, the gist of political 
editorials and campaign gossip lies in the abuse they contain. As the 
insincere and purely perfunctory nature of this stuff is nowadays pretty 
well understood, it is totally impotent. The political power of the press 
is, in my opinion, negative. It is limited to its power of ridicule. It 
cannot elect a candidate, but it can defeat one by making him an object 
of contempt. I think that Blaine will be defeated, not by the power of 
editorials, but by that of cartoons. 

***** 

Talking of the power of the press, it was not evidenced at the Baldwin 
Theater last Monday evening. Jesse Williams, the leader of the orches- 
tra, is a favorite in a large circle of acquaintances. He is a talented 
musician and has officiated at the leader's desk in several companies that 
have appeared hi the last ten years. He was surely entitled to a " recep- 
tion " as he took his seat, but the house was silent. The critic's corner 
got mad and attempted a little display of enthusiasm, hopiog to move 
the house, but the scribbler's welcome expressed by some hand-clapping 
by critics with their husbands, and some cane-rapping by critics with 
their wives, was not echoed in the theater, and the press represented by 
two dailies and four weeklies (this one included) advertised moBt conclu- 
sively its impotency. 

***** 

Nine out of ten people who read, feel inspired with the idea that they 
can write. The true proportion is almost exactly opposite. Half of 
those who make an attempt — do so with a conviction that their strong 
individuality will enable them to tell a strong story and to mark it with 
decidedly original features. They live in the middle station of life, per- 
haps. Out of this station they have never moved, either up or down. 
They are thankful to kind Providence that they have never known low 
life, and they honestly feel that high life is a*thing almost equally despi- 
cable. What sort of a story will such a person tell ? Out of the mouths 
uf the lower characters will issue the individual opinions of the writer, 
coarsened to a certain degree, and from the lips of the aristocratic models 
will pour a strange mixture of grand words and pedantic phrases express- 
ing the very same opinions. These are the errors of the ordinary run of 
would-be novelists. They have no sympathy with their creations. It is 
only with their own opinions or grand views that they feel auy agree- 
ment. The different characters are mere mouth-pieces and are all alike 
except for the difference of incident. To write successfully, one's sym- 
pathies should be stronger than one's pet opinions, so as to be able to 
create distinct characters, instead of mere puppets for the display of one's 
own wisdom or ignorance. 

* * * * 

* 

Some one has written that the reason we have no great American plays 
isjbecause the men who could write them— the literary men — will not trouble 
themselves to do so. This is hardly to be taken as a fact. It by no 
means follows that a successful literary mau is qualified to write a success- 
ful play. In the modern significance of the term, literature doeB not em- 
brace dramas, which are written to be acted, and not to be preserved as 
literary products. Most litterateurs of renown who have attempted stage 
writing have signally failed. Dickens, Longfellow, Thackeray, Tennyson, 
Buchanan, Reade and Collins all met with bitter defeat when they left 



poetry and fiction for the drama. The failure of such brilliant and intel- 
lectual men not only proves that modern dramatic composition is no sim- 
ple accomplishment, but that literary eminence actually militates against 
an author's hope of achieving great things as a dramatist. The poet is 
fancy free. His song may be sung in one key; it may be merry, it may 
be sad; it may not combine joy and pathos. The dramatist, on the con- 
trary, is obliged to run the whole gamut of human emotions. He is 
anchored to earth; he cannot soar into the roseate clouds of imagination 
like the poet; he must hold the mirror up to nature and let it reflect such 
pictures to the view as will act upon the sympathies of the spectator. 
His art lies in exciting the varied emotions of the heart. The poet ap- 
peals to the intellectual sensibilities solely. The dramatist's work is enjoyed 
by all, while the poet's gifts are studied and appreciated by a compara- 
tively limited class. In a lesser degree the novelist is hedged by the same 
restrictions. He cannot construct a play as he constructs a book. He is 
diffusive and improbable, and he handles his rfiaterials in a totally differ- 
ent way to that of the dramatist. In short, the litterateur must be intel- 
lectual, and the dramatist must be human. This is the case in a nutshell. 
There are twenty American novelists to one American dramatist. That 
is because good plays are infinitely harder to write than good books. 
Tennyson is a literary genius, but he cannot write a drama. Bartley 
Campbell is not a literary man at all, but he can write a drama. 

* * * * * 

The Conventions of both the Republican and Democratic parties, called 
to meet in Chicago, have, it is said, finished their labors. Their respective 
candidates, it can be asserted, stand before the public in political and par- 
tisan antagonism. Pour months will elapse between the present time and 
the date of the election. We are in July, and the election is set, accord- 
ing to the Constitution, for the first Tuesday in November. July — 
August—September and October — four months, in which, we believe, 
every journal will defend its candidate and attack that of the opposition. 
Blaine or Cleveland ? This is the question that the voters of this country 
are to answer. On the first Tuesday in November the question will, un- 
doubtedly, be answered. If Blaine is elected, then Cleveland is defeated ; 
if Cleveland is victorious, then Blame's hopes for the Presidency have 
vanished. If Blaine secures the majority of the suffrages, it will be a Re- 
publican victory, and the party in power will naturally continue to govern 
the country. If, on the contrary, Cleveland turns out to be the choice of 
the people, then a change of administration will take place. If — 

# * * * * 

(The above paragraph is a verbatim copy of a sheet of manuscript 
picked up on Clay street, near the entrance of the Call editorial rooms. 
It is torn in half. On the back is endorsed the following : *' We can't 
publish this. The Butler contingency (Greenback nomination) is not 
taken into consideration." Clairbeau. 

GEO. STREET, A.gent News Letter, 30 Cornhill, E. C, London. 

COMPANY^ 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Aumial Sale, 

8, OOO, 000 Jars. 

Einest and Cheapest 
Meat-Flavoring Stoch 
for Soups, Made J>is?ies 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with thefac-eimile of BARON LIEEIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink across Label. The title " BARON LIEBIG " and his photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LlElilG, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEbIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S fjuarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tonic in all cases uf weak digestion and debility. 

" Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medical 
Press, Lancet, Bntish Medical Journal, etc. 

To be bad of all Storekeepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. DAYIL) & CO., 9 Feuchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by EJCHAJ1DS & HA.BRISON, San Francisco. 



LIEBIG 




BLAINE 



Agents wanted for authen- 
tic edition of his life. Pub- 
lished at Augusta, his 
home. Largest, handsomest, cheapest, best. 
By the renowned historian and biographer, Col. 
Coiirt'ell, whosi? life of Garfield, published by 
us, outsold the twenty others by GO.UuO. Out- 
sells everj" hook ever published in this world; 
many agents are selling fifty daily. Agents 
are making fortunes. All new beirinners suc- 
cessful; grand chance for them; $43.50 made 
by a lady agent the first day. Terms most lib- 
eral. Particulars free. Better send 25 cents 
for postage, etc., on free outfit, now ready, 
including larj;e prospectus book, and save 
valuab'e time. 

ALLEN & CO , Augusta, Maine. 



CONTRACT FOR FALL AND WINTER SUPPLY OF COAL! 

EOB YOtTB HOUSE OE STOEE. 

Special Rates for Five Tons. Prices Furnished on Application. 

CHAS. R. ALLEN, 

120 Beale street. Telephone 308. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

MAJfXELS and OSATES, MONVMENTS and BE A OSTONES, 
In Marble and Scotch Granite, 

827 market street bet. Fourth and Finn. 

6S" Send for Deeiims and Prices. W. H. MeOORMM'H. 



July 19, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



NOTAB1LIA. 






Butftttmettet, Deoklwe, tuber ; 

rSfftUM t«r * ledj*l .lumber; 



THE PEDDLLR9 BONO. 

OolJ quota tad rtfinaflhtifi 
Por my Hi to gin tiuir dours; 

ol ftool, 

liilt 1MB (r>'in In ill to bed : 

,1-omebuy, 
Buy, ltd*, or olie your Iiuwh - i 

William Suakm-hark. 



They alt no more in the p.»rl<T where 

Tlu-v s.U by the glowing k'r.Uc, 
But they staud and talk in the twilight fair. 

And they swing '»r the "Id front gate. 
And the old man weeps, hut his bitter tears 

Bring never luilm to hi* soul ; 
It will oast him inure for gates, he fears, 

Than it did last month for coal. 

When a woman thinks the world revolves around her husband she 
naturally speaks or him M "hob-by," and he tells her that, when she 
wants to have ;i thorough house-cleaning, she should ^et the aasistance of 
Messrs. J. Spa aiding & Co., "f the Pioneer Steam Carpet-beating and 
Renovating Works, Nob. 353 and 355 Tehama street. This firm is sure 
bo give satisfaction, and owns the only machine on the Pacific Coast 
which heats carpets exclusively on the hack. 

" How to Take Core of a Husband." is an article in an esteemed con- 
temporary. The average woman knows how to take hair of her husband 
without any printed directions, and please to bear in mind that the Im- 
peiisnabls Paint, sold by J. H. Kelly & Co., Market street, comes already 
mixed, Es impervious to the action of sun or rain, anil goes three times as 
far as other paint. 

Blow, O blow, ye gentle breezes, 
Through the woods and through the treeses: 
Pass the news right through the wicket, 
Then hoot aud yell for that grand ticket. 
The hall is opened, let it roll, 
The virtues of these men extol ; 
They'll run like wildfire through the land- 
Lets have music by the baud. —Chicago Sun. 

Wag: " I say it's a weasel ! " Grigg: " I say it's a Btoat!" Wagg: My 
dear fell tw, a stoat's so weaaUff distinguished ! " Grigg: "A weasel's 
ttoatatty different, my dear fellow!" Proceed unabashed on their tour 
and wind up at Swain's, No. 213 Sutter street, where delicious lunches, 
ice-creams, pastries, confections, etc., can always be obtained. 

A scientific journal discusses "eggs as food." This strikes us as be- 
ing a rather sensible idea and productive of much more good than discus- 
sing eggs as bouquets. But still it is not half so good as the pictures 
taken by those world-renowned photographers, Bradley & Rulofson, cor- 
ner of Geary and Dupont streets, San Francisco. 

It was a cose of breach of promise. The evidence being all in, the 
defendant was allowed to say a word in his own behalf. " Yes," he said, 
"I kissed her almost continually every evening I called at her house." 
Lawyer for the claimant: " Then you confess it ?" Defendant: " Yes, I 
do confess it ; but I had to do it." Lawyer: "Had to do it! What do 
you mean ?" Defendant: *' That was the only way I could keep her from 
ringing." The jury give a verdict for defendant without leaving their 
seats. — Boston Transcript. 

The sign in front of a clothing store on one of our side streets reads: 
" Cast off clothing of every kind," and everyone who notices it feels that 
the advice is excellent — almost as excellent as those pure and unadulter- 
ated liquors Bold by P. J. Casein & Co., Washington and Battery streets, 
to families in retail quantities at wholesale rates. 

The man who can get through the gray matter of his brain the condi- 
tion of things in the Soudan by means of the telegrams should be the 
man to straighten out Grant & Ward's accounts, and ought to be presented 
with one of those fashionable Hats sold by White, No. 614 Commercial 
street, San Francisco. 

*'Her breath is like the spicy gale," warbles a love-sick bard. He 
must have been mistaken. It was the fellow's breath with her. 

Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Rcnewer never fails in restoring 
gray hair to its youthful color, lustre, and vitality. Dr. A. A. Hayes, 
State Assayer of Massachusetts, endorses it, and all who give it a fair 
trial unite in grateful testimony to its many virtues. 

James Hanrahan, Real Estate Broker and General Collector. §10,000 
to loan on mortgages. Office, 319 Sansome street - , American Exchange 
Building. Refers, by permission, to Hon. P. H. Roach and Hon. John 
Shirley. 

The members of the legal fraternity do things just as they please, and 
they ofteu put off till demurrer what they can't do to-day. 

The hotel waiter is an inn dependent, and Dr. Rowas' Famous Rem- 
edy is a sure cure for seasickness. L. R. Ellert & Co., California and 
Kearny streets, are agents for it on this Coast. 

We advise all ladies to discard cosmetics entirely, but in case you are 
bound to persist in their use Boncuti will do more to counteract their evil 
influence than any other soap. 

The peach crop and the speech crop both promise to be large this 
year. — Oil City Derrick. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the most effective blood-purifier ever devised. 
It is recommended by the best physicians. 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724J Market St., S. F. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Baoorded in the City and County of San Francisco California for 
the Week, ending July 14, 1884. 

Oimpik iromthi Jim>rd»uj 'thr VummerHat .4</«.cy,401 California. St., S. I- . 



Tuesday. July 8th. 



ORANTORAND URANTEE. 



_l_ 



nBtTHirrioN. 



II'RUE 



Talk Singe lo Path Mlnchan... 
Wendell E>istun to M IT Lundncrs. 
Mlchl LofluB to John Maguire.... 
E W Burr et al lo W Uasselbrock 
Martin J Actun to Jacob Juggie. . 
(.'has W Randall to Eug Williams.. 
Samo to Ellen Hart 



Undivided one-half so Kreolon, 100 ne 

lUi. DC 26XB0 100-Tsrs 108 ... . ., 
S ('lav. I Hie Biker, e 27:0.VJ. belli)! In 

W A 512 

E Dolores, III :(i » Stlth, e 25X75, being in 

H A 39 

N Day, 105 w Sanchez, w 50x1 1 1, beln.ll 

In 11 A 1*1 

N Elliott, :j«i w sterner, w SiK, belli ! 

in W A 

s California, 181:1 e Lyon, e 25x137. 6- 

W A 581 

N Pine. 181:3 e Lyon, c 85x137:8, brine 

in W A5S1 



f 1, 1100 
850 

i fin 

5 

2,250 

1.580 

M0 



Wednesday, July 9th. 



Mary Ingerson to Wm Boerlcke... 

EllldaJ Middleton to G D McLean 
Itichd RobinBon to Mary A Pollock 

Laura Albreclit toJasPAlex 

A N Drowu to Wm H Wharff 

Job Cordozo to Louis Brunotte. . . , 
Robt CoulBon to Saliic A Roundey 

C C Burr to A Goldthwaite 

Jno C Park et ai to Mary Park 

Marie L Bruns et al to C Wredcn.. 

E G Stetson et al to J Walsh 

Jaa Walsh to Michl Ileiman 



N Vallejo, 137:0 w Fillmore, w 31: 1x137: 
(1-W A 316 

Ne 1st, 135:8 BO Howard, ee 21x77:3.... 

W Broderick, 90 n Golden Gate avenue, 
D 47:8x187:8— W A S8I 

S McAllister, 87:6 o Fillmore, c 50x100 
-W A 302 

N Green, 25 w Oetavia, w 25x100, being 
in W A 19J 

S Broadway, 111:6 o Jones, e 26:3x60. . 

N 17th, 19:3 w Church, w 32x80, being 
inMB95 

S Jackson, 137:6 w Ilydo, w 84:4x187:6 
-lOU-vara 1379 

Sw 21th and Misslou, s 130x117:6. be 
ingin M B170 

E Taylor, 88:9 n Greenwich, n 68:0x187: 
6-50- vara 490 

E Reid, 77:6 s Washington, s 2l).\r.l> 50- 
vara 830 



1 1,510 
5 



4,200 



1. 000 

2,000 



4,000 
4 500 



E Reid, 77:6 s Washington, 8 20x50-1 
50-vara 830 ! 1,150 



Thursday, July 10th 



D S McNamara to Wm Oakley 

Helen M Brunerto Pac Rol Mill Co 
E C Williams to Annie Page .. 



Tully R Wise to Jno H Wise 

H Barnes et al to Annie Page 

Maria E Fiske to N R Baggett.... 
II Holtmeier to Jno R Jones 



1,500 
4,250 



Sw Fair Oaks and 23rd, s 36x90, being! 
inHA27 $2,000 

E Louisianna, 221:6 8 Napa, n 14x200.. 

N Ellis. 171:10 e Larkin, o 84:4x137:6- 
W Addition 

Xe Leavenworth and Washington, n 
137:6x137:6 

N Ellis, 171:16 e Larkin, e 31:4x137:6— 
50-vara 1353 

9w Jackson and Broderick, s 50x112:6 
-W A544 

S Taylor, 82:6 n Union, n 46x77:6— 50- 
vara 402 



4,250 

500 

4,400 



Friday, July 11th. 



Fredk O Wills to Thos McBriorty. 

Geo Edwards to W W Chase 

Robt Murdoch to R H Pluramer. . 

Jos Clark to Sam 1 Hortop 

H F Prechtto JF Q Eggers 



Jos M Comerford lo CbaB G Mason W San Jose Road, 129:6 n Duncan, w 
86:10 x s 6 1-4 inches, being in 11 Ad- 
dition 3 

S 27th, 80 w Sanchez, w 80x114, being 
in HA 127 

Beginning 75 w Capp, and 65 s 20t I, w 
~~:6x S10-M B 63 

N Jackson, 52:2 e Lyon, e 205:4, n 128: 
3, e 17:6, n 15, ne 152:5, sw 189:8, sw 
264:8 to beginning -W A 576 

W Chatlanoga, 200 s 23rd, s 32X125-M 
Block 

Lois 7 lo 14. btk i65, Tide Lands 



5 

680 

5 

10 

1 



Saturday, July 12th. 



Geo Goodrum to Andreas Zhn.... 

Wm II Harries to Ernest J Lyons.. 

Edwd Coffin to Frank Greg 

Jaa Rickbardson to Same 

Chas F Doe to Chaa L Hinkel 

F Janlzen to Folsom St G M E Cb 



Ne 12th, 218:9, nw Howard, ne 148:7, 
nw to 12th street, ne to a poinl, sw 
151:8. se44 tobeg-M B 11 

N Bush, 137:0 e Webster, e 08:9x137:6 
— WA 273 

N 17th, 150 w Dolores, w 25x100, being 
in M B 84 

N 17th, 175 w Dolores, w 1:5x100, being 
inM B 84 

Nw Waller and Devisadero, n 90x10.1- 
W A519 

Nw Folsom, 77 ne 6th, ne 50, nw 160. 
sw 25, se 80, bw 25, seSOlo beginning 
— 100-vara 141 ; subject to a mort- 
gage 



13,665 
50 
5 
5 



Monday, July 14th. 



Isaac T Mordecai to Geo Syiuon.. 

Geo T Marye Jr to V Bellman 

J M Comerford to He.inricb Braun 



E Misssissippi, 225 s Mariposa, s 50 x 
100-PB305 ... ............. ..1(1.1 



N Ridley, 80 e Valencia, e 50x75, bein 
in M B 21 

S 27tb, 127 w Church, w 24x105, being 

in HA 64 

ChaB S Ives etal to Geo W Studley E Shotwell, 245 n 22ud, n 30x122:6, be- 
ing in M B65 

W Hamilton avenue, 350 s Berkshire, 
8 50x100 

Lot 1, blk 39, City Land Assn 

W San Jose Road, 104 n Dancan, u 6:6 
x w82:4— H A3 

W San Jose Road, 77:6 n Duncan, n 27, 
w 84:5, s 27:4, e 75 to beginning -H 
Addition 3 

S 25th, 101:10 e Noc, e 50:llxll4-H 
Addition 131 



J Monkhouse to Jno Buck 

J C Duncan to Delia Murphy 

Chaa G Mason to Jos M Comerford 

Jos M Comerford to Jos H Tboraas 
MaryDnnnigan to M "Warde 



2,650 

1,600 

3,650 

5 
7 

5 

2,700 
400 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER • AND 



July 19, 1884 



MAG DESCRIBES THE FOLKS AT MONTEREY. 

Here we are still to Monterey, but I reckon you'd 'bout as lieve have 
a letter from here as 'most aoy where 's else, wouldn't you? You see 
there's real lots to see down here, 'n as Ned remarked last Sunday evenin', 
"Mag-, if you only keep your eyes 'n ears wide open you'll receive a 
lib'ral education right here." It takes all styles o' folks to make the 
world, don't it? 'n you just bet there's a small world down here " by the 
sad sea waves." We've got all styles to suit (as the fellah says in the 
White House). There's the sentimental blonde 't poses for sympathy 'n 
affection ; au' there's the gushing brunette 't most slops over with twad- 
dle ; 'n the rich, ugly girl an' the poor, pretty one {loads o' them) an' the 
flirtatious sly one an' the bold coquette. ! all varieties. When it 
comes to the married wimmen, though, there's what Ned calls a general 
similarity — on the subject of flirtations at least. O' course there's some 
'ts reg'lar old hands at the bizness, 'n are old stagers, too. Then there's 
wives o' salaried officials 't loves dress. {Some one's got to foot the bills) 
an' there's grass widows an' divorced wimmen, an' separated wimmen, an' 
wimmen liviu' apart from their husbands — not o' necessity, but choice, 
an' wives 't plays their husband for all they're worth, 'n so forth. Then 
comes the dowagers— the old hens that cackle. La me! don't they cackle! 
There's the heavy respectability 'ts always a pickin' holes in their neigh- 
bors, 'n the pharisaical old wimmen 't turns up their eyes 'n hands over 
the goin's on around 'em, an' the highly proper vinegar-faced matrons 
't look like frost ready to nip everything about, an' the highly anxious 
ma 'ts lookiu' out for a settlement for her daughter (or daughters, as the 
case may be), an' the scheming chaperone 't manages to get hold o' the 
eligible young men, 'n encourages 'em herself for her charges benefit, an' 
oh ! such heaps o' folks 't I couldn't begin to enumerate 'em all. 

The men don't 'mount to much, except Saturday. You see them kind 
't lies round loose here durin' the week are gen'rally useless sort o' fellahs 
't haiot got the energy nor ambition to be at work, 'n so they sort o' loaf 
through existence. I do feel kind o' sorry for some o' the bank clerks, 
'cause it must be real hard to live a fash'nable pace on a small salary. I 
tell you, buggies 'n French candies count, they do, an* suppers ('n so 
forth*). I don't so much blame some of 'em for tryin' to 'stablish 'em- 
selves on a good, firm basis by a rich marriage. Walter Gilmore, 
he got kind o' desperate n' went off to the rural districts, where 
he heard 't there was a lo(a)de a waitin 1 for some one, 'n he just 
prospected round 'n thought he'd work things, 'n so he did, an' now 
he's the happy successor o' a dear departed. I guess his whiskers caught 
her. Widows is death on whiskers. It kind o' tickles 'em, an' they do 
love to be tickled. (You may wonder how I know, 'cause I aint no 
widow; but la me! baint I got the Judge an' Ned to post me on such 
things, eh?) We're havin' a real good time down here. Most people get 
into cliques — sittin' at tables for meals, 'n drivin', 'n swimmin' together, 
'n such. Mrs. Sam's a masher, you bet; she don't seem to care a cent 
't the wrinkles is awful discernable by daylight. She just squeezes her- 
self 'n powders, 'n so forth, 'n goes in for bavin' a stavin' time, *n she has 
it, you bet. No foolishness 'bout her. Mrs. B she goes in for a differ- 
ent kind o' fish to fry — it's all fish with her; never mind 'bout its quality. 
There's a young married woman here, with a right slim figger, 'n she's 
got a real devoted beau, 'n they go takin' walks together way off by 
theirselves. Well, the other day we was all to a picnic, 'n I got wan- 
derin' round with George, an' who should we stumble right 'gainst but 

Mrs. , bein' a hugged an' squeezed by her follower! My! didn't she 

get red in the face? Jehosephat!! I rushed up, an' says I: "You 
needn't feel a bit scared — I aint agoin' to tell no one." So she gave me a 
real grateful look, 'n told me I was " a sweet child." (Healthy child?) 

A quartette ('s we call 'em) o' four plays Lawn Tennis a good deal; two 
o' the four's a reg'lar contrast. He's real good-lookin', 'ceptin' a down- 
ward droop o' the eyes 't makes him look sort o' Chinese-ish; but Lord 
bless you, she's ugly! The other two does most at spoonin'. It must be 
real weariu' to be so much in love 'n not get married. I asked the 
Judge how 't was, 'n he just hushed me up like I was committin' murder 
— old beat! Then there's another set 't plays cards for gloves 'n small 
sums! 'n another couple 'ts bent on botanical excursions. (I reckon she'll 
get her fill before he leaves her). Such a lot o' toadyin' as goes on, 
too, 'd just make you real sick. 0* course, the Crockers get the most, 
but the little widow's got the inside track with the missis, 'n whichever 
way she goes the master goes too. Mrs. Hearst is always selected as a 
mark for poor girls to aim at 'cause she's so awful good an' kind. She 
always has one in tow *t she does lots for. I told you 'bout fat Mrs. 

S , didn't I ? — how she kind o' swaggers around puttin' on airs, 'n 

the Irish widow 't the Judge 's kind o' goin' for. He says he's always 
been anxious for bliss. Allan Bowie's been makin' eyes at a light-haired 
married woman, 'n I can just tell him he'll get left on that racket, 'cause 
another fellah's on the inside track already. Jessie's had a real good 
time. She's liked by all the men, 'n if the wimmin don't like her it's 
'cause they're all jealous o' her big eyes 'n innocent ways. 

There's a good deal o' singiu' goin' on, at odd times. You see Sybil 
Sanderson's bein' here made that, what Ned calts, a foregone conclusion. 
Flo' 's death on dress. I reckon she's got a few hints from Henry Kedington. 
They say t he ; s goin' to patent a new discovery o' his, 'bout some kind o' stuf- 
tfin'to use as breast pads, *n he says 't they can use it for their — ahem— limbs 
in bathin' tights, without bein' 'fraid o' spoilin'. If it takes right smart, 
who knows he may make a pile o' money. (Well, I really an' truly didn't 
think 't he knew nrich 'bout the shape o' them things — but you never can 
tell ; ma says them awful soft chaps is the very worst, sometimes, 'n you 
know the little widow trained him 'n George both, an' just look at 
George's last exploit !) 

Speakin o' bathin' tights, there was a high old time down to the raft 
the other day, when two folks got out there 'n began doin' " spoons," an' 
they drippin' wet. A youth 't was near by heard it all, 'n weDt 'n told 
his ma, 'n o' course she gave the whole thing dead away. His ma's a awful 
pretty woman still, though my ma says they was girls together. Charlie's 
ma 's 'bout played out. She don't show nowadays. Ned says he reckon's 
't the state o* her complexion 's what cooked her goose. Ain't it real 
comical how awful easy some folks is tickled at seein' theirselves puffed in 

the newspapers? Now, there's granma , 'ts just too delighted for 

anything 'cause she was put in 'mong the list o 1 beauties in a newspaper, 
the other day. There's an awful deep, real thick flirtation a go- 
in' on here now — just like ostriches, they think 't no one can see 'em. 
You bet every one's a chin-nin' about 'em, an' the first thing you know 



some one '11 get left. Ned says it '11 be the husband. You just wait 'nsee. 
The fat goody-goody boy's been givin' his approval o" Pacific street, 
down to the water's edge, 'n has published a list o' the folks 't suits his 
taste there. Aint it lucky (for him) 't he's got a rich old ma 't can buy 
him a printin' press to fool with airin' his opinions? Sheldon didn't 
come this way for the Fourth, though I knew some folks 't were kind o' 
hankerin' for him ; but la me! Borne old hen's are as sticky as a porous 
plaster, 'n if they once get their claws on a man — young or old— they'll 
never let him pass — even in the train. I really thought Sheldon 'd had 
'bout enough o' old wimmen. Well ! ta ta, now! More anon from 

Mag. 

Not an Illicit Distillery.— A reporter, passing the northwest corner 
of Geary and Mason streets, was attracted by the sounds of machinery 
under the sidewalk, and upon making an investigation as to the kind of 
manufacture carried on here found that he had stumbled ou the drug and 
powder mills of Stoddart Brothers, the manufacturers of the celebrated 
Damascus Creme and Powder, the great beautitiers of the complexion, 
the ingredients of which are all imported directly from Europe. Wagon- 
loads of these celebrated cosmetics are manufactured and shipped from 
here every week to all parts of the continent. The Damascus prepara- 
tions have long ago taken tbe place of Eastern beautifiers of the same 
kind, for the fame of their remarkable properties has spread so rapidly 
that it has found a lasting place in every lady's boudoir. No drug store 
now fails to keep it in stock. Stoddart Brothers did a lucky stroke of 
business when they acquired the knowledge of its composition according 
to the original Syrian recipe. 

We desire to call the attention of capitalists and others to a very in- 
teresting sale, by public auction, of 500 acres of very choice Fruit Lands, 
situate in Haywood, Alameda County, which will take place ou the pre- 
mises, August 16th, at 12 o'clock. The estate will be divided into lQ-aere 
lots, and the live stock, implements, etc., thereon will be sold at the same 
time. Persons who wish to purchase at this sale, but who are unable to 
be personally present, can arrange to have their wishes carried out 
through Taggart & Dingee, Nos. 460 and 462 Eighth street, Oakland; or 
Easton & Eldridge, No. 22 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

The Alta California Printing-House has removed from its old-estab- 
lished quarter over the Alta office to 522 California street, across the way. 
The proprietors, W. A. Woodward & Co., purchased the stock and good- 
will of W. T Baggett & Co., and expect, by the consolidation and in- 
creased facilities, to be enabled to turn out efficient work more rapidly 
and at low rates. This old-established house has always maintained a 
reputation for first-class work and fair dealing, and we hope an apprecia- 
tive public will tender their encouragement to make the new venture of 
the firm a grand success. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex-- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately af- 
ter returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be pre- 
vented. James G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 

Yineyard and Orchard Property 

FOR SALE, 
In 20, 25, 30, 40 or 60 Acre Tracts, to Suit. 

BEST BARGAINS IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY! 

This Property is located on main county road, between San Jose and Los Gatos, 
three-fourths of a mile from railroad station, and near good school and church. 

This Vineyard consists of two and three-year-old, next WiDter, of choicest variety 
Of Foreign Vines; also TWO HUNDRED Choice APHICOT TREES, THREE HUN- 
DRED ORNAMENTAL TREES, etc. Soil unsurpassed by any in California. 

This Property, with all Improvements, is offered at about the price of unimproved 
land iu that vicinity, and presents an opportunity to purchasers seldom met with. 

For particulars apply to 

WOODWAED & BEAOH, Eeal Estate Agents, 

10 Montgomery st.. San Francisco. 



TILES 



of Every Description, 

For Decorations. 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 

311, 313, 315 and 317 Market street, Sau Francisco. 

REMOVAL.-THE "ALTA CALIFORNIA" PRINTING HOUSE, 

The Oldest Established Book and Job Printing House iu the City, 
HAS REMOVED FROM ITS OLD QUARTERS, OPPOSITE, 

— TO — 

522 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Where it has Purchased the Stock and Good-will of \V. T. BAGGETT & CO., the 
" Law Journal" Printing House. 
By this consolidation and increase of material we are still better enabled to turu 
out WORK RAPIDLY, EFFICIENTLY AND CHEAPLY. 

W. A. WOODWARD & CO. 



HASTINGS' COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

The Next. Sessiou will Open on Tnursdny, August 7th, at 9 
o'clock a. m.. In the HALL OF THE PIONEER SOCIETY, on Montgomery 
street. Examinations for admission and deferred examinations on August bth, 7th 
and Sth, at 9 a. m, iu the same place. Applications for admission should be made 
to the Dean, at his othee, No. 41S California street, San Francisco. 

[July 19.] ROBERT P. HASTINGS, Dean. 



July 19, L884. 



CALIFORNIA Al»\ KKTISKK. 



19 



"BIZ." 



Wo remark iocreawri activity in buainaaa circle*, the very natural re- 
unit of the ingathering of bountiful uropi of fruiw, omali, Ota, Ham* 
tera are DO« El the Bud cutting Uio ripened grain, which proves to bo of 
nt i|uality and (Treat in ^imutitv. Non Vvwatit now arriving ai 
lid« moor in iucreaaed qiuntiuc-*. Snippen are in tho market, and have 
already purchased and contracted for tome '.*0.000 tons July and August 
deliver*, within the range o. per cental, for good Shipping 

gradea, while miller* pay 91.40<a 1.45 f->r Choice New and Old. This re 
Dewed movement in WheeA, at current low prices, has induced ship|>ent 
to enter the freight market, and they have secured in all some 50 vessels, 
here and to arrive, for Autumn loading. Recent Spot charters include 
the following vessels: Ship James Drummond, 1,557 tons, Wheat to 
Liverpool direct, at t'l ISaj Br. Iron bark Maude, 1,17- tons. Wheat to 
fork, l'. K., fifl :•*.: ship H. F. Packard, '-',100 tons, Wheat to Liverpool 
direct, fl lis.; ship I,. Bobtpp, 1,776 tons. Wheat to Liverpool direct, 
£1 Ma.; Br. ship (iron) Phaais, l,4iW tons. Wheat to Cork, U. K., 82 6b.; 

this last vessel was chartered prior to arrival— ship John R. Kelley, 
2.300 tons, Wheat to Liverpool direct, £'1 14s.; ship Manuel Llaguna, 
L733 tons. Wheat to Liverpool direct, 34s.; ship Raphael, 1,405 tons, 
Wheat to Liverpool, Havre or Antwerp, private; Br. bark (iron) Rou- 
tenbeck, 'X 1 *) tons, Wheat to Cork, V. K... A."-' 5*. if to a direct port ; U. 
K., 9a '••!. teoa ; iMp - s t. Mark, 1,073 tons, Wheat to Liverpool direct, 
£1 15s.; Br. bark Cormorant (iron), 1,073 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., 
Hark Forest Qaoab, 486 tons, Lumber from Puget Sound to Hon- 
olulu ; brgte John Worster. 581 tons, Lumber from Humboldt to Sydney. 
There is now on the berth about 42,000 tons, against 22,000 tons at even 
date last year. Disengaged fleet, 131,000 tons ; same date last year, 
85,000 tons. Fleet en-route, to arrive in six months, 228,000 tons ; same 
date 1883, 200,000 tons ; same date 1882, 300,000 tons ; same date 1881, 
357,000 bona 

Arrivals during the period under review embrace the following: Pacific 
Mail S. S. City of Sydney, 24 days from Sydney, via Honolulu 7h days, 
with passengers and Government mails, and for cargo— 70 bdls. Whale- 
bone, 2,647 ingots Sydney Tin, etc.; also, in Treasure, S30.G95. Pacific 
Mail B. S. City of Peking, 24 days from Hongkong, via Yokohama 15£ 
days, with passengers, Government mails, 800 Chinese in the steerage, 
and for cargo 0,400 mats Rice, 3,800 pkgs. Tea, 334 bags Coffee. 4,000 
pkgs. Chow-Chow; also, in transit for Eastern cities, to go overland, 
17,359 pkgs. Tea, 186 pkgs. Silks. From Kahului, per schr. Ida Schnauer, 
5,759 bags Hawaiian Sugar. Schr. Beulah, 28 days from same, with 
9,122 bags ditto. Brig J. D. Spreckels, 18 days from Kahului, with 
5,600 bags Sugar. Ship Carondelet, from Hongkong to Macondray & 
Co., with mdse. Stmr. San Pedro, from New Tacoma, with 4,000 tons 
Coal. 

Exports for the week under review, embrace the following leading 
items : To China, per O, & 0. steamship San Pablo, 13,803 bbls. Flour, 
54 000 yds. Cottons, 3,838 lbs. Ginseng, etc ; value $93,000. Also in 
Treasure, §486,308. To Japan 441 bbls. Flour, 9,200 lbs. Sugar and 
Merchandise ; value 810,786. To Singapore, 180 cs. Salmon, etc. To 
India 925 bbls. Flour ; value $3,053. To Batavia 25 cs. Salmon. To 
Central America, per Quickstep, 256 M. feet Lumber, 2,500 Laths, Oil, 
etc.; value $11,052. To Honolulu, per Calbarien, 6,500 lbs. Sugar and 
Merchandise ; value $15,548. To Mexico, per Newbern 300 flasks Quick- 
silver and Merchandise ; value $68,000. To Antwerp, per Ger. ship 
Kaiser, hence July 9, 16,876 ctls. Rye and 22,625 ctls. Wheat ; value 
$51,235. To Apia, per Brazileira, 48,00 lbs. Bread, 225 pkgs. Salmon and 
Merchandise ; value $11,861. To Victoria, B. C, per Wilmington, 
16,000 lbs. Sugar and Merchandise; value $6,030. To Tahiti, per Grey- 
hound, 150 M. Shingles, 129 M. feet Lumber, 18,000 Shakes, etc; value, 
$3,139. To Victoria, B. C, per Queen of the Pacific, 5,300 lbB. Coffee, 
195,000 lbs. Rice, 1.500 lbs. Wool and Merchandise; value $24,500. To 
New York, per ship St. Frances, hence July 9th : 285 sks. Abalone 
Shells, 472,500 lbs. Beans, 5 cs. Books, 15,610 ctls. Barley, 225,026 lbs. 
Borax, 5 pkgs. Glassware, 144 sks. Horn, 95 cs. Household Goods, 499 
bale6 Leather Scraps, 5 cs. Merchandise, 2 pkgs. Machinery, 214,000 lbs. 
Iron Ore, 2,011,000 lbs. Copper Ore, 66 bales Paper, 53 Primevera Logs, 
13 sks. Pearl Shells, 29.550 lbs. Soap Bark, 300 M. Shingles. 2,210 gals. 
Vinegar, 44 cs. Wine, 736,722 lbs. Wool; value $207,859. 

Treasure Shipment. — The steamer San Pablo, hence July 12th for 
Hongkong, carried the following shipments of Treasure : 

Comptoir d'Escompte de Paris, 39 bars Silver Bullion $ 56,000 00 

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, 74 bars Silver Bullion 106,000 00 

Anglo-California Bank, 37 bars Silver Bullion 54,200 00 

Anglo-California Bank, Mexican Dollars 18,300 00 

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, Mexican! Dollars 136,000 00 

Bank of California, Mexican Dollars 14,350 00 

Chinese, Mexican Dollars 89,788 75 

Chinese, Gold Coin 8,650 00 

Chinese, Gold Dust 3,019 20 

Total $486,307 95 

Coffee. — The private circular of R. Hockofler, dated July 14th, has the 
following arrivals since June 29th: Per steamer San Bias, 30th ult., from 
Nicaragua, 418 bags, 54,340 lbs.; from Salvador, 642 bags, 98,226 lbs.; 
from Guatemala, 1,861 bags, 260,540 lbs.; from Mexico, 21 bags, 
3,833 lbs.; from Java, via Hongkong, 334 bags, 46,240 lbs. During the 
same period of last year the receipts were 4,013 bags from Central Amer- 
ica, and 115 from other ports. 

Sugar.— Arrivals since June 29th to July 14th: From Sandwich Isl- 
ands. 48,054 pkgs., 5,050,360 lbs.; from Central America, 107 pkgs., 16,- 
050 lbs.— total, 48,161 pkgs., 5,066,410 lbs. Business is very dull. Prices 
for Refined and Grocery Raws are unchanged. 

Coal and Iron. — J. W. Harrison's Circular of July 12th says: Coal. — 
Prices "to arrive" are: Australian, $7 25@7 37£; Liverpool Steam, 
$7 12i@7 25; West Hartley, $7 50@7 75; Scotch Splint, $7 25@7 37£; 
Cardiff, $7@7 25; Lehigh Lump, $12 50@12 75; Cumberland Bulk, 
$9 25@9 50; Egg, Hard, $11 25@11 50. Pig-iron.— Prices "to arrive" 
are as follows: Eglinton, $24 per ton; Glengarnock, $25; Shotts No. 1, 
$26; Clay Lane White, $22; American Soft, No. 1, $25 50. 



150 150 150 

THE STANDARD SHIRT, 



"inri.li 





N.B. 
150 

uvu 
fine linen: 

Is tho VERT BEST Quality WHITE SHIRT for 

$1_50_ 

Give this Shirt a trial, recommend it to your friends, and promote Home Manu- 
facture by asking for 




150 



150 



150 



THE "POPE HOUSE" HOTEL. 

The Pope House, for fifteen years past the Leading.Private Hotel 

and Boarding--Hou.se of Santa Cruz, 

Enjoying the first patronage in the State, haa CHANGED HANDS, and 

REOPENED MARCH 25th, 

Under the direct personal management and supervision of the New Proprietors, who 

hope, by close attention to the wants and comforts of their gueBts, to merit 

a continuance of the valuable patronage so long enjoyed by Mrs. Pope. 

Private Family Dininfr-ftooniN. 'French Dinners Served to 

Order, in Best Style. 

JS?~ Speci.il OMNIBUS awaits all arriving and departing traiosj and steamers. 

No charge whatever for conveying guests to or from this Hotel. 



KINCSFORD'S OSWECO STARCH 

IS THE 

STRONGEST. PUREST AND BEST, 

AND IS RKC00X1Z6D AS 

THE STANDAEL ALL 0VEE THE W0ELD. 



FOB INVALIDS, 
KINGSFORD'S CORN STARCH 

IS HIGHLY BECOMMENDED FOB ITS PVBITY AND 
DELICACY. Sept. 30. 

THE /ETNA SPRINGS ARE NOW OPEN. 

To the highly curative properties of these waters and the charms of the place is 
added an Elegant and (Japac oub SWIMMING-BATH. These waters Purify the 
Blood, Refresh, Renew and Restore the Whole System. They Cure Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, Dj'spepsia, Erysipelas, Kidney and Liver Diseases, Chronic Diarrham, Par- 
alysis and Pulmonary Complaints, in the early stages. They afford magical relief in 
cases of Nervousness, Sleeplessness and General Debility. 

For Pamphlet, containing Analysis and Cures, address, 

WM. BURNELL. Superintendent, 
Or WM. H. LIDELX, Proprietor, 
Udell PostofBce, Napa County, Cat. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COB. HALLECK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the businees portion of the city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, SI, SI 25 and SI 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 60 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, iroocl for any meals, |5. Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

ART CLASS WORKS, 

Nos. 1211, 1213 and 1215 Howard St., bet. Eighth aucl Ninth. 



JOHN MALLON. 



May 3. 



ALAMEDA.. 

&g- Purchasers can secure some BABOAINS IN IMPBOYED 
and UNIMPBOYED PBOPEBTY, by applying to 

3. M. REYNOLDS, Ileal Estate Agent, 

[April 5.] Park St. , near N. G. K. K , Alameda, Cal. 



APPJ7 X7 Send six cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
X XvJ-Z^ J_rf. of goods which will help all, of either sei, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute'? 
sure. At once address Tbce & Co., Augnsta, Maine. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1884. 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 
The cholera plague is still racing in France, and the number of 
deaths in the afflicted places seems to be increasing, though there does not 
seem to be any very marked enlargement of the infected area. Since the 
first outbreak there have been 1,500 deaths in Marseilles; at Toulon the 
exact number cannot be ascertained. In Paris there have been some 
choleritic cases, but they do not seem to have been of the epidemic na- 
ture. Koch, the German doctor, who is probably the greatest living 
authority on this subject, seems to be of the opinion that the disease will 
spread all over the European continent. Its importation into the United 
States, he seems to think, is quite probable. 

There is but one step from the sublime to the ridiculous, and this in- 
disputable fact has received a particularly amusing and interesting 
illustration in the grave international complication which has arisen 
over the tearing down and burning of a German 6ag from the Hotel 
Continental, in Paris, by a few Alsatian students. This act, it will be 
observed, was not perpetrated by the Government of France or by its 
agents, or with its permission, or even by its subjects (for the Alsatians 
are actually German subjects). Yet the German Ambassador has com- 
plained of the " insult," aud the head of the French Ministry has apolo- 
gized for the "outrage." Even that has scarcely mollified the Berlin 
press, for a portion of it still continues to cry out for "reparation." 
Surely it would be difficult to conceive of anything more absurd. A flag 
is the emblem of national existence, and, as such, each nation is bound 
to protect the dignity of its colors. But when it comes to interfering in 
petty little broils like this, dignity is not protected but lowered. It is 
not loDg since a crazy American burned the British dag. amid a crowd 
of howling "chaws," on tbe Sand lot. If the British Government had 
taken official notice of the incident, it is not going too far to say that we 
would all have pronounced the British Government to be a consequential 
fool. 

There are no new developments in the Franco- Chinese trouble, though 
negotiations are actively progressing. It is understood that the French 
ultimatum was delivered to the head of the Chinese Goverement. at 
Pekin, on tbe 12th instant, aud that one week was given for reply. This 
time will elapse on the day that this paper is published, and as France 
threatens to lay siege to Chinese ports, unless her demands are com- 
plied with, lively times may be looked for ahead Unless, however, 
China has promise of outside support, moral or physical, it is pretty safe 
to predict that she will back down as she did before; and it is not unlikely 
that she will ask for further time to consider the French proposals. 

The French ultimatum is said to contain a demand for an indemnity, 
the surrender of Langson and other places named in the original treaty, 
and the withdrawal of all Chinese troops from the Tonquin frontier. 
If these terms are not assented to. Admiral Courbet's fleet is to immedi- 
ately bombard the forts at Shanghai, and Admiral Lestes is to disembark 
his forces at Foo Chno and seize the arsenal there. These will be the 
initial steps in a war which may set half the world in flames. 

In tbe meantime, while this ultimatum has been delivered in Pekin, 
and the French fleet is actively preparing for the alternative, Prime 
Minister Ferry and Ambassador Li Foug Pas are calmly discussing, in 
Paris, tbe question of who fired the first shot at Langson, in order to 
ascertain whether any indemnity may properly be claimed by France — 
at least the Associated Press telegrams of the 15th said so. 

The conference on Egyptian affairs will resume its sitting in a few 
days and the outcome of its deliberations must be looked for with great 
interest if not apprehension. The financial position is this : Under the 
old system of collecting taxes — which involved the free use of a cowhide 
on the taxpayer — Egypt was able to meet her financial responsibilities. 
Under the present, and somewhat English system of administering the 
finances, in which the cowhide is not a Tax-collecting auxilliary, money 
does not come in so freely, and, unless a reduction is made in the rate of 
interest, Egypt cannot meet her liabilities. Frenchmen, who hold, it is 
estimated, about 8160,000,000 of the debt, and who do not care whether 
the " taxes " are brutally beaten out of the unfortunate peasants or not, 
clamor for their peund of flesh and object to any reduction in the rate of 
interest. This is what the conference is now conferring about. 

El Hazar, the authoritative Mohammedan University at Cairo, has pro- 
nounced in favor of El Mahdi's religious claims. This institution has 
hitherto denied these claims, and its present action can scarcely fail to 
influence many of the Arab tribes. 

The political affairs of Great Britain are in a very uncertain condition. 
Gladstone is said to be giving strong evidence of great physical weakness. 
This, in the face of a condition of affairs which calls for intellectual, 
physical and moral strength, looks bad. Aff present, things in regard to 
the Franchise Bill seem to be in statu quo, but there are rumors of 
negotiations looking to a compromise with the Lords and the passage of 
the bill. The Radicals are red-hot for a fight with the Peers, but Glad- 
stone's health is not equal to the strain ; if it were, they would probably 
be accommodated. 

Panama is now indulging in the luxury of two governments. This is 
the result of the impeachment and removal of the President. One gov- 
ernment of this kind should be sufficient for any one people. 

In the way of exercise, combined with real amusement, nothing 
could be healthier or more delightful than a good swim, and, unquestion- 
ably, the finest place in the neighborhood of San Francisco to enjoy that 
luxury is the Terrace Baths, at Third avenue, Alameda. This famous 
resort, at this season of the year, presents one of tbe gayest and most ani- 
mated scenes one could imagine, and the person is fortunate, indeed, who 
can escape from the beat and turmoil of the city to where the dancing 
waters of this great tank utter a ceaseless yet silent invitation to come 
and lave in their cool and refreshing depths. To those who can spare an 
occasional hour and a half, a bath at the Terrace will save many a 
doctor's bill. 



A TRADE FRAUD. 

There are few ways in which a vigorous, well informed and inde- 
pendent journal can better serve the community in which it lives than 
by exposing the social, professional, trade and other frauds which are de- 
stroying its vitality, juat as so many cancerous sores would destroy the 
vitality of a human being. It is the pride of the News Letter that 
throughout its long career it has always been the open and active enemy 
of frauds of all kinds. Its course in this respect has brought upon it the 
harmless and imbecilic abuse of addle-pated fools, as well as the shrewd 
and, sometimes, hurtful enmity of conspicuously knavish rascals. 
Neither the windy vaporings of loud-mouthed idiots nor tbe less noise- 
some, but more effective, actions of rascals, has ever caused ub to swerve 
from the course which duty pointed out. As it has been in the past so it 
will be in the future. Fraud is not dead in this community, although it is 
less shamelessly bold and open— and that latter fact, by tbe way, 
renders it all tbe more dangerous, because it renders it all the 
harder to find out and expose. We are led into this train of re- 
flection because we are about to renew, in a more or less limited way, 
that exposure of trade frauds, adulterations, and tricks with which we 
startled this community some little time back, and which resulted in 
making it possible to get something pure to eat and to drink. It has 
come to our knowledge that the canning industry, or. at least, one de- 
partment of it, is thoroughly honeycombed with fraud. This is one of 
the great and growing industries of this great State, and warning 
voices have been raised from time to time to intimate that if 
unscrupulous canners did not stop putting up fruits and vege- 
tables which, from over-ripeness or other causes, were not fit for 
use, the reputation of our products would become impaired and the de- 
mand for it reduced, if not destroyed. The fraud which takes place in 
this respect, however, is trivial compared with that which we have dis- 
covered characterizes the jam and jelly department of the business — par- 
ticularly in jellies. If fruits and vegetables lacking in richness of flavor 
are canned and sold, the buyers get, at least, an inferior quality of the 
article they supposed they were purchasing. With jams and jellies it is 
different. In a country where fruits are so plentiful and cheap, one would 
think that it would hardly pay to substitute artificial ingredients for the 
real material. To think so, however, is to think erronenusly. By the 
substitution, a considerable increase of profit may be realized, and, as a 
matter of fact, we are in a position to assure our readers that the greater 
portion of the jams and jellies put up in this State are merely chemical 
compounds — some of them, probably, dangerous — without a trace of the 
fruit they bear the name of. These compounds may be quite as good as 
the article they represent. Until we have further information, which 
we are now in search of, we are not prepared to express an opinion on 
that point. But we are prepared to say that it is a gross fraud upon the 
public to represent an article to be what it is not, and sell it upon the 
strength of that representation. If these compounds, these imitation 
jams and jellies are as good as the real article, all right ; tell the public 
this and sell this imitation article as an imitation article. A purchaser 
has an inalienable right to get exactly what he is led to believe he is 
purchasing. Otherwise, he is cheated. 

Dr. O'Donnell has appealed to the Sunday Sand-lotters to meet him 
to-morrow at the City Hall, and accompany him in a triumphal proces- 
sion to the Oakland ferry, en route for New York, with his pair of lepers. 
We strongly protest against any charlatan or quack being permitted to 
make political capital out of any of God's unfortunates who may be 
stricken with an incurable malady. Their sufferings are fearful enough 
without adding to them by a catchpenny show, where they would be the 
observed of all observers. Leprosy is a matter for our health authorities, 
and we hope they will take it in hand promptly and fearlessly, sparing 
no expense and omitting no measures whereby all traces of the disease can 
be exterminated. We also hope that any attempt that may be made to- 
morrow by this man O'Donnell to create any sickly sentiment, will be 
quickly suppressed, and that the police will interfere to forbid the sight 
of a procession of two lepers, which he has promised shall march to tbe 
foot of Market street, to the accompaniment of martial music. Stop tbe 
brass of the man and his brass bands, and any such attempt to desecrate 
the Sabbath. 



THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

CAPITAX SUBSCRIBED $10,000,000 

Capital paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to capital) J ,875,000 

Total Assets June 30, IS S3 5,333,712 

WM. GBEEB HARRISON, Manager, 

[July 19.] 308 Pine street, San Francisco. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

New Basil Consolidated Gravel Minium Company.— Location 
of principal place of businesa, San Francisco, California. Location of works, 
Placer county, California. Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors, held on the 9th day of July, 1884, an assessment of Five (5) Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately 
to tbe Secretary, at the office of the company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco,- 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment Bhall remain unpaid on 

Monday, the 18th Day or August, 1*8 I , 

Will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 

made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 9th day of September, 1884, to pay 

the delinquent assessment, together with coat of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of tbe Board of Directors. F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

IJuly 12.) 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

assessmentnotTceT^ 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 30 

Amount per Share Fifty Cents 

Levied ;.; July 9th, 1884 

Delinquent in Offiie August 14th, 1884 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2d, 1881 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 




s- ; -Eetter 




Vol. 35. 



SAN FRANOISOO. SATURDAY, JULY 26, 1884. 



No. 3. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE CO., FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 

B^omt/K <.f the AEROPLANE COMPANY for Navigating the Air. 600 
boon from 1 1" - p. m. 



STOCKS. 

The evening organ of the "wreckers," "pirates,*' and bear clique 

generally, hus not yet been successful in staying the rising tide in tbe 

market. On the contrary, Its futile i-fforts have had a tendency to 

strengthen pri es. The public, comprehending the situation, show their 

iust appreciation of opinions, actuated by selfish and interested motives, 
>v oopperinff them. The mines are looking quite as well at present as 
they ever did, even when the leading authority was praising them sky 
high. 

The condition of the mines has little or nothing to do with the market, 
and never had. 

Ni't a single mine on the Comstnck ever had a showing to warrant the 
extravagant figures at which they have been quoted, and no one is better 
acquainted with the fact than the sage correspondent. The market has 
always been subject to the whims of leading manipulators ; it is to-day, 
and always will be, as long as stock gambling exists on Pine street. 

The Chronicle article, rehashed and used as a weapon of war by the 
"authority," was written in spirit and intent diametrically opposed to 
the construction placed upon it for personal ends. It was simply in- 
tended as a correct statement of facts and figures. The general tone of 
the article was sensible in the extreme and truthful in every line. Its final 
application, to serve personal pique, in the relation of the mine3 to the 
market, was, we reiterate, ill-timed. 

The public will derive more benefit from an investigation and exposure 
of the fraudulent operations of the milling ring in Virginia City, which 
would save them at least a moiety of the profits, than by all the columns 
of boshy theoretical opinions upon the future of lower levels, printed in 
the interests of speculators. We would like to see the authority unearth 
his hatchet in a good cause. 

Hale & Norcross is looking well on the 2,800-foot level. The small vein 
of ore lately found assays well, and its character and quality is good. 
All that is now required is quantity. The formation surrounding the new 
find is of such an nature that the chances are more favorable for an im- 
portant development than they ever have been before on the lower levels 
of this mine — even when the celebrated stringers were found some 18 
months ago. At that time, our esteemed and sage correspondent, the 
" leading authority," was as positive a. bull as he is now a. bear. His 
roaring about the future bonanza and the future of this mine, when the 
2,800-level was reached, has made him hoarse. Xow he cau only growl. 

Present appearances indicate that the gentleman was correct in his sur- 
mises published a year ago. The " stringers " have led into a " vein " on 
the 2,800-foot level. Why he is so angry over the verification of his own 
predictions is a conundrum which will only bear one solution, viz., 
Climbed a fence and fell into a bear-pit. The bear3 would now be justified 
in returning his erstwhile complimentary (?) allusions by rending him into 
quarter sections. 

There is no appearance of a pool in this Btock, wiseacres to the con- 
trary. Some people evidently have confidence that there is something 
in the mine, or they would not have paid §7 a share for it. Again, the 
general public are not heavy buyers of this stock. They have been 
cinched so heavily in the past by purchasing on newspaper " points," that 
they have grown wary. In the future outsiders will exercise some caution 
not only in their investment, but in believing what they read. If there 
is not a bonanza on the 2,800-foot level, there is on the 200-foot level. 
On this level there is a good body of ore, which goes from S20 to S80 per 
ton. If stockholders had the profits from this placed to their credit on 
the books of the company, assessments in the future will be light. 

Mexican, as we said last week, is likely to be the point of interest at 
tbe North End. The stock has advanced considerably and that on merit 
of the mine. 

Best & Belcher and Gould & Curry are alBO strong — from a different 
cause, however. There is every probability that these mines will be 
leased, or, rather, "farmed out," after the manner and in the same in- 
terests as Con. Virginia and California. 

The ledge in Alta has teen entered by the drill, but, so far, there is no 
official information of the result. The peculiar manner in which this 
stock has been fluctuating lately indicates that opinions as to the future 
are about evenly divided. For ourselves, we still believe there is money 
in the stock, and this on the general principles which usually regulate 
Btock-gambling, and irrespective of whether the mine possesses merit or 
none. The men who now control the destinies of Alta had a peerless 
reputation in days gone by for daring and skill in manipulation. Any 
operation in which it was reported they had an interest carried the crowd. 
The heavy fluctuations, changes rapid|as a flash of light, suited the gam- 
bling spirit of speculators. High pressure was the order of the day while 
the deal lasted. No exasperating procrastination then retarded the turn 
of the wheel of fortune. The verdict of sudden wealth or financial death 
was speedily decided. What has come over these parties lately ? Has 
"the right hand lost its cunning?" 

London, July 25.— Consols, 100 5-16d. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



\ Caution to Britiahen. 10 

A Judicial Farce 10] 

a Klnndoni In i;-v.,it ■.» 

Am We i Htlzens, or Sot ! '1 

\ SpU'Tiiliil riiaiK-e. 15 

*' Ha" 

Blaine's Letter of Acceptance 10 

Oommenta on Foreign Vttialn 20 

Pacts Sot Generally Known l 

Fashion's Voice 2 

Lo. the Poor Sailor 20 

Mag- nt Saucullto 15 

MuU.' Beauties 5 

Martin Liifhtfoot's Song {poetry) fl 

Mr. Thomas Uendes ." 3 

Mutiny at Durtmoor SO 



Bfotabllla ..... ...17 

Passing Bemarkfl is 

Pleasure's Wand ... t\ 

Ti unaacUons 17 

Seientille ninl Useful 19 

Society 3 

Sporting 7 

Stocks l 

The British Ship " Reliance " 8 

The Cholera ...u 

The Great Boolal Crime 8 

The Now Orleans Fair gq 

The News Letter's View of the Question 8 

The Sorrows uf a Genius. 20 

Town drier 11 

We Scalp the Public Schools 4 



G 



OLD BARS— 920 fine par.— Refined Silver— 14@15 $ cent, dis- 
count. Mexican Dollars, 10@10A per cent. disc. 



**T- Exchange on New York, 20c; on London Bankers, 4fUd. Paris 
sight, 5-12i@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New York, 30c. 

**" Price of Money here, 7@ 10 per cent, per year — bank rate. In che 
open market, 1@1^ per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
6 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand good. 



«" Latest price of Sterling in New York, 484@48C. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

San Franoisoo, 'July 25, 1SS4. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stock* and Bonds. 


Bid. 


j°ked 


BONDS. 








11 


2i 


Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 .... 


— 


— 


BANKS. 






S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 6s, '58 


— 


— 


Bank of California (ex div). 


155 


180 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s ... 


— 


— 




183 


— 




— 


— 


First National (ex div) .... 


116 


120 




— 


— 


RA1LI10AD8. 












0. P. R. R. Stock 


38 


40 










110 




— 


— 




70 
57) 
92} 










— 


_ 




9B1 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 


— 


— 




95 


99 


Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 


— 


.- 


Geary Street R. R 


96 


97 


Virg'a & Truckee R. R. Bds. 


— 


— 


Central R. R. Co 


20 


— 


Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bda 


— 


— 


Market Street R. R 


Nom. 


Nom. 




— 


— 


Clay Street Hill R. R 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Or.R.&N.Co.Bonds,fls(exc) 


106 


108 






52 


99i 
120J 


100 




28 


28} 




120} 


Sac'to Gaslitrht Co (ex div) . 


57 


59 


N.Pacific K. R. Bonds 


1014 


103 


Califor'a Powder Co 


110 


145 




142 


120 
147 




50 
35 


70 




Qold and Stock Telee'h Co. 






08 






125} 
02 


S.V.W.W.Co's Stock(ex dv) 




B81 

116J 




85 


116} 


MISCELLANEOUS. 






Pacific Coast S.S.Co's Stock 








95 


116 




141 


160 




38 
47* 

10 


42 
4SJ 
35 
11 




61 

50 








70 


INSURANCE COMPANIES. 


118 









Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 


4 


6 


Fireman's Fund (ex div) . . 


-- 


131 


California Iron and Steel Co. 


5 


n 




— 


116 



California Iron and Steel Co's stock fell yesterday afternoon to S2.J per 
share, in the hight of what looks like a causeless panic, aggravated by 
the announcement that the Judson Manufacturing Co. had rescinded its 
dividend and levied an assessment of @5 per share. All industrial enter- 
prises are affected, while the volume of business does not pay the office 
rent of the brokers. A. Baird, 411 Montgomery street. 

The annual report of the Board of Fire Commissioners was Hied with 
the Board of Supervisors this week. In their detail the figures of the 
report show that this important branch of our Municipal Government 
is in the hands of careful and conscientious men, and that the taxpayers' 
money is not needlessly squandered by them, although they practice no 
false economy. David Scannell, the Chief Engineer, also filed his report, 
which shows that there were 454 alarms during the year, with an esti- 
mated total loss of S5G4,017_98. This is a very creditable showing, and 
speaks volumes for the efficiency of the department. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 25, 
1884.— TJ. S. Bonds— 3a, 100J ; 4s, 120|; 4£s, 112£. Sterling Exchange, 
4824@484A. Western Union, 58£. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@24 : Burry, 
lOglG ; bulled, 28@38 ; Fall Clips, 16@20 ; Burry, 10@14. London, 
July 25.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 7s. 7d.@7s. lOd. Firm. 

The plant and materiel for the construction of a railway between 
Tientsin and Peking have all been constructed by a leading engineering 
firm in Germany, and have, we believe, already been shipped to China, 
whither it is now in course of transit. 

Registered at the Poetoffice at San Francisco, California, as Second-Class Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1884. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



The Sunday Gusher gave us a very creditable list of good-looking 
men last week, but heavens ! what a mistake it was ! TheBe good-for- 
nothing, autocratic beings were stuck up enough before, and now there is 
no knowing where their vanity and impudence will stop. 

Looking closely into the list, however, there is scarcely a man who is 
not put down as being fond of the ladies. 

Well, we knew that all along. San Francisco men are noted for their 
" sick " wives and gallantry. It is as much a matter of necessity to them 
to have a pretty woman to fool as it is to eat their dinner; in fact, it is a 
mode. They buy their coats as a matter of necessity, always taking the 
last fashion. They love the girls on the same principle, and it is posi- 
tively a fashion, from which they cannot deviate, to make love to every 
woman they meet. 

I met a very nice man, the other day — a new man. We chatted for 
quite a while, when I thought I would ask if he was married, because he 
had invited me to go out with him on the Haight-street cars. In reply 
he said, brightly : "Well, of course I'm married, but it don't make a 
particle of difference." " To me it does," I said, regretfully, " since the 
fact bars my going on those cars." " Bless your soul !" he said, " it is all 
the same ; my dear little wife is always sick, and she'll never know ; I 
am only iu the fashion."' ' So it appears," I went on. " O, dear, shall I 
ever again meet a married man whose wife is not sick?" He looked at 
me blankly. '"Are they all sick ?" he said. "Every one I ever beard 
of," I replied. And now the Sunday Gusher tells us, in so many inuendos, 
that every man Bet down on the beauty list is a lover of the ladies, or is 
loved by them. In fact, there seems to be as much fashion in this kind 
of thing as choosing a hat or dress— choosing his girl — quite a la mode — 
'pon honor. But let me get on to my veritable fashion article and leave 
these silly dudes alone. 

The newest thing that strikes me as being useful and really deserving of 
notice is a glove which is long enough to cover your arm up to the shoul- 
der, with a fulling of silk let in, the casings of the silk being filled with 
elastic. Thus you can slip on this glove without the least trouble, not, as 
heretofore, swearing sotto voce in an unknown tongue because it is such 
hard work buttoning 24 buttons, or otherwise squeezing your hand into a 
mnusquetaire, the orifice of which being in the palm, you find frightful 
difficulty in getting the hand — which is always too large for the glove — in 
at the wrist. Thus the fulled silk gore let into the inside of the glove is a 
blessing and a benefit, preventing bad language and much trouble. 

Gauntlets are also the correct thing, fancifully embroidered from the 
wrist up, and thelong silk mittens are much in vogue, though their beauty 
is questionable, and here let me ask why women wear mits. If they have 
pretty white hands, a very few days will serve to tan them as brown as 
though they were perpetually at work in the garden, and if they have 
ugly hands what so superlatively unbecoming as a mitten ; but why try 
to read the riddle of a woman's " Why ? " 

The " post-boy " hat is the newest craze in London, and a'few are seen 
on our streets. The high crown and rimless back do not make it a thing of 
beauty, but it is odd and new, in which lies the charm. The trimming is 
high in front and should be a rosette of lace and aigrette, otherwise a 
bunch of feathers. The favorite flower in Europe, though, as yet, it is 
not with ub, is the dandelion. I think this is the first appearance of the 
common " clock" as a head trimming. Last Summer marigolds did duty, 
and the dandelion is just as effective, and in fact a more ethereal looking 
bloom, according to the shape of the petals. The color— bright yellow. Red 
atill rules as a fashion color, rich, full and dark, rather than the brick or 
scarlet shade we have had bo long. Other colors are awarded a share of 
favoritism, Holbein green and coffee brown being the most distinguished. 

Aprons for home wear are again much worn. One, of pale pink sateen, 
is shirred just below the waist, and again in three shirrings, about six 
inches lower down; thence falls a flounce of Madras muslin, the bib being 
of the same. A pocket is placed at the right side, or with a coquettish 
bow on it. Another bow at the right side of the waist. Again, an apron 
made of finely spotted Swiss, trimmed with bows, placed here and there, 
and a bib, with one bow, at the left side of the bust, is a pretty caprice 
for afternoon toilette. 

Cravats of lace are more than ever used, fancifully arranged with loops 
and bows of ribbon, and the bows for trimming dresses are no longer 
groups of narrow loops, but wide ribbon made into tie bows, say four bows 
and two short ends, tied small in the center. It is a change from small to 
large only. A cravat of white mulle is a long piece of the material taken 
round the throat and tied by a bunch of ribbons ; then tie again, lower 
down, pip, on so as to form a puff on the bust, and the ends fall down. 

There is little or no change in the mode of dress-making. To fasten the 
bodice on one side by a row of large buttons is no longer new, yet it comes 
this fashion on imported robes, and I must say I like it. 

Draperies are still gathered up like a lambrequin, the folds in front be- 
ing a good receptacle of crumbs and all sorts ojE refuse. We bow to fash- 
ion, and have, of course, to put up with its pains as well as its pleasures 
— that is, J don't do it, but you do; and if you choose to hang a valance 
from hip to hip, and get up at a reception, after eating cake, with the 
creases filled with crumbs, with which you leave a trail along the street, 
that is your fault, for I have often descanted upon the consequences ; 
therefore you are beforehand warned. Siltek Pen. 



To the Ladles. — Mrs. Lewis is now prepared to do the buying for per- 
sons in the interior, and any order received, either for Toilet, Millinery, 
Upholstery, Furuiture, Jewelry, Ready-made Clothing, etc., will be 
promptly, correctly and conscientiously attended to. Str?ngers in the 
city will find that by calling at Mrs. Lewis' rooms they will gain much 
valuable information. A commission of fifty cents will be charged for 
attending to small orders amounting to $10 or less, but on orders amount- 
ing to more than $10 no commission ie charged. Address Mrs. R. G. 
Lewis, Rooms 28 and 29, Thurlo w Block, 126 Kearny street. San Francisco. 

No house can be said to be thoroughly fitted up which does not poa- 
sesB one of those New Monarch Oil Stoves for 1884. This is one of the 
most complete and effective little cooking apparatus ever constructed. It is 
perfect in every detail, and has only to be used to be appreciated. Ladles 
should not omit to call on Messrs. F. Meyer & Co., No. 869 Market 
street, and examine this treasure, or else send for a descriptive circular. 



ARE WE CITIZENS, OR NOT? 

Among the fifty ways in which the average American citizen shirks 
his political duties, and shows his lack of appreciation for his privileges and 
responsibilities, is the way in which even high-toned and highly moral 
members of this community stoop to petty and disingenuous shifts for the 
purpose of evading jury duty. Your average citizen is always ready to 
agree, with considerable warmth even, that this Government is the " best 
in the world, sir," but in spite of this he inwardly believes that, so far as 
it calls for the slightest extra exertion on his part, it is a profound bore ; 
good enough, no doubt, for looking after thieves and criminals, levying 
taxes, and all that sort of thing; but iu other respects not entitled to the 
least share of his time or his attention — in fact, a thing rather to be let 
well alone, if possible. The only occasion on which the average citizen is 
apt to recognize his intimate relations with the Government is when some 
zealouB reformer makes a dangerous attack on the protective tariff. At 
that time the manufacturers are prone to discover on a sudden a positive 
and patriotic conviction that the welfare of all is bound up closely in the 
welfare of each, and that no right-minded man can grudge so much of the 
product of his toil and sweat as may be sufficient, when distributed, to es- 
tablish prosperity and content throughout the land. 

The utter misconception of their relation to their government, and es- 
pecially to municipal government, is astounding and inexcusable. Con- 
sider how small an exertion would be sufficient to fulfill all responsibility, 
and to make a government everything that it ought to be in point of hon- 
esty and capability. Can it be denied that if even one-half of the citizens 
of this municipality were willing to undergo the terrible wear and tear of 
attending their ward clubs even three nights yearly, they would be able 
to »ominate and elect an honest man to every office within the gift of the 
people ? But they make themselves blind to the power that is in their 
hands, and steadily stand aloof from the exercise of their bounden duty. 
Their blindness is voluntary, and it is criminal. The timber land frauds 
are uuearthed by the News Letter ; the butcher town monopoly is ex- 
posed in the columns of daily journals. From day to day public corrup- 
tion is discovered ; scandal after scandal is brought to light — where ? In 
the columns of a newspaper. The people are culpably neglecting their 
business as citizens of this municipality, and are completely satisfied, 
forsooth, to have their interests looked after by the vicarious efforts of 
public journals. Their negligence so far in this respect has, to some 
extent, been compensated for by Borne effective work on the part of their 
proxies. But this jury duty — can it be possible that our citizens are 
aware of the consequences which must impend on a neglect of this duty? 
It is impossible here to shift upon newspapers, or other proxies, the per- 
formance of this political sacrifice. If respectable citizens shirk this 
paltry expense of time, then there are scores of low and dishonest char- 
acters who will desire nothing better than to reap the monopoly of this 
privilege. The prostitution of justice that will follow upon any attempt 
to remove the constitution of juries from the large body of respectable 
citizens is something appalling to contemplate. 

But the constitution of juries is daily becoming a more serious question. 
In New York the number of exemptions from jury duty i3 simply over- 
whelming. Iu this city the juries are practically drawn from some 5,000 
men, In the last criminal venire, 160 citizens were excused before the 
panel could be filled. Some crisiB must soon issue iu this matter. Cor- 
ruption and depravity in the jury-box strike justice and fair-dealing to 
the ground. The inalienable right to a just trial is jeopardized in the 
hands of irresponsible hirelings. There is actually no reasonable ground 
for the excuses that are daily presented by honorable men and accepted 
as valid. Jury duty has a right to be regarded as a necessary and una- 
voidable item in the expenditure of a citizen's time, just as much as is a 
fire insurance premium in the expense account of a business undertaking. 
If we are born to American citizenship, we are born to jury duty. Do 
we expect to have all of the privileges and none of the dnties ? This free 
country is what it is. because we are individually endowed with citizen- 
ship and freedom. When we despiBe and evade the duties of our position, 
in ways of which jury-shirking is but a single significant example, we 
threaten our country, our State, our municipality with a speedy cancer 
of destruction, whose symptoms are even now not indistinct. 

Clearance sales of slop dry goods are of every day occurrence. The 
stocks of many establishments, indeed, are selected with a view to being 
sold in this way, and they are, so to speak, in a perennial Btate of clear- 
ance. But bona fide clearance sales of such magnificent goods as are kept 
by a first-class establishment like the White House, corner of Post and 
Kearny streets, occur but seldom, and when they do occur thrifty persons 
should take advantage of them. Raphael Weill & Co., the new pro- 
prietors, have obtained the splendid stock of this establishment upon 
terms which enables them to sell at absurdly low prices. 

BETHESDR 

COOLS THE BLOOD. 



Devoid of Strong Salts—Soft and Delicious. 



SIS' Persons who indulge in vinous and alcoholic stimulant; will find it the 
MOST REFRESHING, ENLIVENING and INVIGORATING draught ever provided 
in the Laboratory of Nature. 

L. CAHEN & SON, 

418 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

NO. 18 GEAJRY STREET SAN ERANCISCO. 

Incorporated November 24th. 1S69. — Ariolph C Weber, 
President; Ernst Brand, Secretary. Loans at Low Rates. 



.Inly J6, 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



8 



SOCIETY. 



July 94 ISM. Although thil morning it is cold, damp and wintry like 

there has !>een litt!- d plain .<f tin- bright warm «Uvs "f 

il (rook, mnl tot Park, which i> looking beautifully at present, hart 

h. nl in unusual number al rldton of tho*e who have not gonfl out of 

town tin* SumiiuT, I'Vfii for the brief bronthtng spell of from Saturday 

till Monday. I cootd uum the Blanks and the Blanks and the Blanks, 

■ [u under ihli heading, who nil amy they prefer the oomforta of 

hoOM during' the fashionable season abroad, and will take their "outing " 
when the rush, onuh and crowd :it -Monterey and elsewhere are over and 
paafci 

The season has been a late one, both in town and country; still, every 
day now bring* its retaining tmvelers, and .very day fresh faces* are to be 
s--.li npon 1'iir itnete, all looking more or less browned by country air and 
■nnahine. However, that does not mean a renewal of galetlaa in town, 
for nine times out of ten people come home more tired than refreshed by 
their Summer oantpalgn, and, as a rule, do not rush into entertaining the 
moment they get back to the city again, and, if all that I bet»r be true, 
the evil day will this year be postponed as long as possible. 

1 tinners and weddings generally till the bill when alt else fail, and in 
addition to these we have now a more than passably good opera troupe at 
the ( iaUfornia, which is well attended by the fashionables of society, and 
where one can bee all of them who are to be found in town. Under the 
beading of dinners let me mention as the most noticeable that given by 
l»r. Charles Brigham to a number of his professional brethren, the dinner 
d'adteu of Mr. Sennits, of the Pacific Club, that of Mr. Jerome Lincoln 
to Baron Itubner, and the Harvard Club reunion dinner, which took 
place at the Palace Hotel— all of which were spoken of b}' the guests in 
terms of highest commendation. 

Engagements annonnoed and reported are becoming more numerous 
every day. Of the former is that of Judge W. S. Wallace's eldest son, 
K viand Wallace, to Miss Annie Bradley, and among those reported is one 
said to exist between Miss Susie McMullin and General Tom Williams' 
ton and namesake. Many others are whispered of and surmised, but 
even the daring tongue of gossips has not breathed some of tbem aloud, 
ai yet. So, therefore, neither will your correspondent. Weddings are 
equally numerous; though, as a rule, the ceremony has been performed 
in the presence of a few intimate friends only, and of this description were 
those o' Miss Jennie Morris and Mr. W. H. Higgins, which took place 
at the residence of the bride on Thursday afternoon last, the lie v. Mr. 
Miller -trficiating ; Miss Edith Patten and Mr. Frank Wiley, of Vir- 
ginia City, at the Palace Hotel on Tuesday afternoon; Miss Ella Bovee 
and Mr. Henry Sontagg, also on Tuesday, at the Bovee residence on 
California street, and the nuptials of Miss Annie Congdon and Mr. R. 
W. Osborne, which were solemnized on Tuesday evening. Oakland, too, 
has joined the ranks of marryers, and on Tuesday evening the wedding 
of Miss Emma Allen and Mr. G. F. Was tell crowded the M. E. Church, 
where the ceremony was performed by the Rev, Mr. Anthony. The 
church was literally a mass of floral decorations, which were arrayed with 
much taste by a number of the bride's young lady friends, and for once 
the building was like a veritable conservatory and blossomed like a thou- 
sand rosetrees. Promptly at half-past seven the bridal party entered 
the sacred edifice, the four ushers — Messrs. Baxter, Hill, Carrack and 
Parsons— leading the way, and followed by two charming little maidens, 
who strewed flowers from dainty baskets. Then came the bridesmaid, 
Miss Mabel Terry, with the best man, Mr. Albert Wastell, and finally 
the bride and groom. After the ceremony, a namerously-attended re- 
ception was held at the residence of Mrs. Allen, the young couple re- 
ceiving many beautiful gifts, and hearty congratulations and good 
wishes on the commencement of their new journey of life together. 

Apropos of weddings, the newly-married pair, Mr. and Mrs. "Lucky" 
Baldwin, who are at present spending their honeymoon at the East, have 
sent out cards for Thursdays in October, and rumor has it that at each 
reception there will be some delightful surprise for the guests, and each 
evening will end with a dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Bunker have also sent out cards for their silver 
wedding on the 7th of August, which entertainment will be a dual sort of 
affair, the afternoon being devoted to the "old folks," and in the evening 
the young people will have a German. A delightful time is anticipated 
by all, and the friends of Mr. and Mrs. Bunker, who are only bounded by 
their acquaintances, are already vying with each other as to which will 
make the prettiest selection of remembrances of the happy day, as it is a 
foregone conclusion that none will go empty-handed. 

On Friday evening last the first of the promised " hops " took place at 
the Presidio, and was a most enjoyable little party, and on Saturday 
evening the San Francisco Yacht Club gave their initial " hop " at their 
club-house at Saucelito. Commodore Harrison was the presiding genius, 
and it is proposed to hold them every two weeks during the rest of the 
Summer Beason. Affairs at the Navy Yard have been very quiet since 
the sailing of the Monongahda for Callao last Saturday, and Army circles 
in the city are principally busy with the encampment question at present. 
The Olympics, who have been in a state of retiracy so long, are once 
more coming to the front, and announce a tournament to be held at the 
Pavilion at the conclusion of the approaching exhibition, to which all are 
looking forwai'd with much pleasure. 

Mrs. S. F. Thome's health was very much improved during her visit 
to San Jose, and she is now at Gilroy for a short time. Mrs. Dunphy 
and her family are making the Geysers their place of resort this Summer, 
and will probably remain there till September. Mr. and Mrs. Alvord re- 
turned from their wedding trip East last Saturday, and can be found at 
the Savage residence, which they have taken, on Harrison street. The 
Reddings and Miss Kate Grim are back in town from Mount Shasta. 
The Floods are looked for in about ten days, and next week Ward 
M'Allister, the newly-appointed Alaskan Judge, will be here, en-route. 
To-day's train brings back quite a number of absentees, among them being 
General Kelton and daughter, Dr. and Mrs. Burgess, Rev. Kalloch, Mrs. 
Washington Berry, and a number of officers of the Fourteenth Infantry. 
The Goodmans and Mrs. Stubbs, and the Government Directors of the 
Union Pacific Railroad and a party of friends are also coming, on special 
cars. To-morrow Wm. Dunphy and J. C. Breckenridge, more Demo- 
cratic delegates from Chicago, will arrive. Felix. 



THE GREAT SOCIAL CRIME. 
It can scarcely bo doubted that the unnatural interference with the 
female reproductive function la the grant aooia] crime of the day. It ii 
reported t.> by sfItss who I i'.«r children, and by the nnnui 

ried tooonoaal their shame, Woman moving. In respectable aomel v. and who 
are apparently leading a blameless and roll am to think it no ai i! 

i what they are | dl their honor b] Iwaya painful, 

frequently destructive both t" health ami happtnsaa, and every now ami 
then attended by a fatal termination. Buch pel DDI an ■ ntloually ap 
plying to physicians to relieve them of the oonaequenoe <»f their own Im 

prudence, and unfortunately thero are found man authorized to pi 
medicine who proclaim themselves the £odtet' Frim-i, and wh.i " 
to conceal the immorality ami accept the crime. The praotlofl is, la 
so common, and affects so many people, that no one wishes to have itex- 
posed and have its authors punished. It is astonishing how ready we aro 
to condemn infantcide as practiced by uncivilized communitisa, and yet 
how ready we are to hush up the crime of foeticide whenever, by some 
untoward accident, it is forced upon the attention of the public. We 
have, indeed, laws against abortion and abortionists. We naveaCorO 
uer's Court to investigate tho cause of death, and judges to try and 
punish guilt. But the public hurrah when they have been bluffed suc- 
cessfully, and such a thing as a thorough investigation and a conviction 
of the guilty, is absolutely unknown. 

These remarks have been painfully illustrated by a recent case. No 
one really doubts that the lady was pregnant and was anxious to con- 
ceal her condition. No one doubts that an abortion was produced 
which resulted in her death. It is simply incredible that two physi- 
cians, who have been entrusted for seven years past with the post 
mortem examination of cases involving criminality, aud whose special 
attention was directed to the condition of the womb, should have been 
so criminally careless as to make themselves the wound which they 
described to the Coroner's Jury as having been inflicted during life, the 
source of the hemorrhage and the cause of death, and yet how completely 
have the facts been mystified. Outside statements have beeu made 
as facts. Facts have been stated without proof. No experts were, ex 
amined and no cross examinations held. It was stated, for example, that 
in the course of the treatment a speculum was used. If so, when and 
with what object? The injury was invisible in that direction. The in- 
strument was even worse than useless— nay, it was positively dangerous 
in case of peretonitis, and it could throw no light upon any affection of 
the kidney. If, as is more than probable, the wound was self-inflicted, 
for assuredly desperate women will take desperate and painful chances, 
why was not the instrument produced and the real facts detailed? No 
one, indeed, has greater right to complain of the miscarriage of inquiry 
than the professional attendant of the deceased, whose position has been 
more injured by his own foolish statements and recriminations than by 
his conduct of the case itself. No one is condemned, and no one cleared. 
The main object was to hush up an unfortunate business, leaving suspi- 
cion upon all concerned. We believe it would be better to have no 
inquiries than a farce like this. We can only suggest that physicians who 
are called upon to attend such cases would do well to protect themselves 
by insisting upon a statement of facts before a confidential witness, to be 
used only in case of urgent need. Such a statement would have been 
extremely valuable in the present case. 

Mr. THOMAS MENZIES. 
No merchant of recent years has taken a higher position in the com- 
munity than the gentleman whose name heads this paragraph, while few 
enjoy a greater personal popularity amongst the select circle who enjoy 
the advantage of his social acquaintance. To mercantile talents of a high 
order, Mr. Menzies united a financial training that has formed a happy 
combination of qualifications in a new member entering the old firm of 
Falkner, Bell & Co., from which be has now retired, with a handsome 
independence, well and worthily won. We say *' worthily won," because 
no transaction has ever been associated with Mr. Menzies' name that was 
not open and above board, equally free from doubtfulness, whether in 
point of soundness or regularity. We have no warrant for saying that 
Mr. Menzies' retirement at the present time is due to the attitude of the 
firm as promoters of a scheme that has been exposed and freely denounced 
in these columns. We merely note the coincidence, aud go on to say that 
we understand Mr. Menzies does not retire entirely from active life. In 
whatever field he may see fit to operate he carries with him the esteem, 
confidence and best wishes of that part of the community whose good 
opinion and good will are best worth having. 



Married— In Oakland, July 23rd, by Rev. Dr. McLean, Frank Lowell 
to Lillian D. Kohn. 

The Placque Pictures of the Elite Studio have such a poetical effect 
that they are most popular. 

BLANKETS! 



We have opened a Special Department for the Sale of 

Blankets and Comfortables. 

We ■will show as large, if not a larger, Stock than 
can be Found in San Francisco. 



Gtreat I IS HLj 3 

Corner Kearny and Commercial streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER %AND 



July 26, 1884. 



WE SCALP THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

We have looked into the public school teaching of San Francisco, and 
propose to go for the scalp of these institutions. They cost enough to be 
good, and they are not good enough for their cost. We find pupils at the 
age when we had taken up algebra and geometry, doddering along still in 
elementary arithmethic. We compare notes with a friend who got his 
schooling at the East {in Connecticut), and who has boys of his own. He 
therefore has had experience of these schools, and we ask him how he 
has managed. He tells us he found his boys had lagged miles behind the 
pace he was put through ; that he tried public and private schools here 
faithfully, and had to give it up. He then sent his oldest boy to one of 
the old New England schools, and the fellow came home after a couple of 
years, having learned what he ought to have learned. He had, in fact, 
made up his lost time. Quite a number of San Francisco boys have gone 
to the Eastern colleges, and have, as a rule, entered high ; but those we 
have personally known of, all (we believe) received coaching by a tutor 
at the same time that they attended the public schools. We are not go- 
ing to pitch unreasonably into the public schools. We know that three 
hundred boys cannot be taught in a day school as thirty could be. Per- 
haps our public schools are doing a« well as other American schools do. 
We merely wish to point out that their work is, in the extreme, unsatis- 
factory, measured by the only standard we have to measure with — our 
own experience, and that of such of our friends as were similarly taught. 
We are not oblivious, either, that the public school children are being 
taught without cost (comparatively) to their parents — compared, we mean, 
with what first-class private schooling cost in New England and at the 
date referred to ; but we do insist on remarking that this San Francisco 
schooling is so inferior to that, that it ought not to be put up with. The 
fairly well-to-do parent can attempt a remedy by engaging a tutor ; but 
when the state of our public teaching is such as to render this course im- 
perative, it seems to us clear that the standard of teaching should be 
raised, if only for the benefit of those children whose parents are not in 
position to provide them tutors, or whose own educational disadvantages 
are such that they are unaware of the need of tutors. We suppose the 
only way of doing this is to increase materially the number of teachers, 
and with it the whole expenses of the Department. Well, this ought, 
then, to be done. 

But the foregoing is by no means the end of the matter. We have 
pointed out how poor this teaching is, compared with that of the higher- 
class New England schools, as these existed thirty years ago, and as we 
see that they actually exist to-day. But during the whole of that thirty 
years we have had it rubbed fato us how inferior even this teaching to 
that of the German public schools is. For having been t mght what pass- 
ed for civil engineering we have since had an opportunity of comparing 
what we were made to acquire with the acquirements of a eood many 
Germans, and of some from the United Kingdom — Irish, Scotch and 
Englishmen. American technical schools have improved since our time, and 
we have met some of the younger men who are better equipped than we 
were, but a good many who are no better. However, the average of the 
whole lot of us is below that of the foreigners. We are now speaking 
solely of book acquirements. But we want to put in a word or two here, 
spoken by Prof. Simon Newcomb ; his word is weighterthan ours: " Not 
only is our mathematical education far behind that of France and Ger- 
many, but a much better mathematical training than our average student 
gets is absolutely necessary to an adequate comprehension of physical 
science. To take an example: It is safe to say that the number of our 
college graduates who know mathematics enough to understand clearly 
what physicists mean by the terms ' conservation' and * transformation of 
energy' is very smalL * * It is probably safe to say that the average 
Ph. D., who has just graduated from a German University, speaks and 
understands both French and English better than nine-tenths of American 
Masters of Arts speak or understand either French or German ; that he 
reads Greek equally well with his American compeer, and Latin a great 
deal better ; he also has as good command of mathematics as the best half 
of the American graduates, and possibly as good a command as the aver- 
age American professor of our three hundred colleges." Here our astron- 
omer is comparing the final results of the two Bystems of education, when 
each is carried to its highest grade. Taken at any stage of the course, 
from the Kiudergarten to the University, equal inferiority — an inferiority 
of kind as welt as in degree — will be found in American teaching. We 
think it likely that Gov. Stanford has observed the results of this deficient 
training in the small army he has employed ; and this may be one of the 
reasons that now impels him to found a school, at which American youth 
can equip themselves for their struggle to exist in competition with for- 
eigners of whatever land. 

A curious point in diamond lore has just been established, to the de- 
light of savants, in Paris, where the exhibition of the Crown jewels at 
the Louvre has made the subject very popular for the moment. It has 
not long been laid down that the diamond has the power of retaining 
light and of afterwards emitting it in the dajk. The theory has been 
well buttressed by reasons, but the proof has not been easy of test. All, 
or nearly all, the great diamonds -such as the Koh-i-Noor, the Regent, 
the Grand Mogul — cannot for public reasons be made the subject of ex- 
periment, and stones of a lesser size do not always give satisfactory re- 
sults. Happily, a private individual, the owner of a gem of 92 carats, 
and estimated at a value of 300,000 francs, has lent his diamond for 
scientific investigations. These have been most satisfactory, and the 
'■ phosphoresence " of the stone may be regarded as proved. The diamond 
was exposed for an hour to the direct action of the sun's rays, and after- 
wards nemofed into a dark room. For more than twenty minutes after- 
wards $ emitted a light, feeble indeed, but still sufficiently strong to make 
a sheet of white paper held near it quite visible in the dark. A similar 
result was arrived at by a very different experiment, and light was gener- 
ated by rubbing the stone with a piece of hard flannel. 



Among the laxatives which the genius of modern pharmacy has 
produced for the benefit of suffering humanity, Slaven's California Fruit 
Salt holds the foremost position. In cases of dyspepsia, biliousness, 
kidney and liver troubles, and other disarrangements of the human 
organization, it is paaticularly efficacious. His Yosemite Cherry Tooth- 
paste is a splendid dental preparation, and his Yosemite Cologne is a 
delicious perfume. 



FACTS NOT GENERALLY KNOWN. 

Napoleon as a Deadhead.—" Who is he ? " asked a dramatist of Tal- 
ma, as the latter was accosted by a young man on the streets of Paris one 
day, dressed in the seedy uniform of a sub-lieutenant. " O," was the re- 
ply, "he is an impecunious fellow, passionately fond of the theatre, who 
bothers the life out of me for free passes. As he appears to comprehend 
classical acting, I grant him his requests." " Who is he?'' asked the same 
dramatist twenty years afterwards, as a man in the uniform of a Marshal 
of France stopped his horse to salute. "That is the young man that 
used to bother me for passes for the theatre. He has no occasion to do so 
now. He is the Emperor." 

John B. Gough was a singer of comic songs in New York before he be- 
came a lecturer. 

P. T. Barnum began his show life as an advertising agent for Turner's 
Circus. 

John H. Haverly was a tailor's apprentice. He first went into the 
show business with Cal. Wagner's Minstrels. 

David Garrick was the wealthiest actor that ever lived ; also was most 
honored. 

"Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean," is an English song; was changed 
from " Britannia " to " Columbia," and was first sung in the United 
States by E. L. Davenport, an actor. 

Baltimore has produced the most actors of any other city. Next is 
Philadelphia, and then comes Boston, and least of all is New York. 

The oldest theatre that now stands in this country is the Walnut street, 
in Philadelphia. The next oldest is the old one in Savannah. Ga. 

The oldest actor living resides in St. Louis— N. M. Ludlow, 87. 
Charles R. Thome, Edmond S. Conner, Joe Procter, Thomas Lyne and 
James E. Murdock, all over 70. Macklin, the actor, played Ski/lock at 
95, and died at 105. 

Lester Wallack was at one time an officer in the English army, served 
in India, born in 1819, but still plays juvenile characters. 

Ed. Bingham used to keep a cigar-shop on the corner of Montgomery 
and Washington streets in 1858. Was also a soldier before he went on 
the Btage. 

Barney Williams set up tenpins for a livelihood when a boy. His real 
name was Bernard O'Flaherty. Died worth 8400,000. 

Frank Mayo, real name Maguire, was a waiter in a restaurant in this city, 

James. E. Murdock, George Jordan. Wm. E. Burton, M. W. Leffing- 
well, Artimus Ward (Charlie Brown), J. H. McViokor were printers. 

Lawrence Barrett was a bell boy in a hotel in Detroit. 

Charles Wheatleigh, Edmon S. Conner, James M. Scott were tailors. 

John Collins was a cook, in Dublin. 

Joe Wheelock and James E. Carden were sailors before the mast. 

A. H. Davenport (Dolly) was a jeweler's clerk, then studied law with 
Dan'l. E. Sickels, was admitted to the bar in New York. 

Edmond Kean (real name Carey), Dion Boucicault, Tyrone Power, 
Macready, Gustavus V. Brooke, John P. Kemble were all strolling 
plavers. 

McKean Buchanan was a sugar broker in New Orleans. 

Joe Emmett was a house aud sign painter before he became an actor, 
in St. Louis. 

Tom Maguire was a hack-driver in New York. 

The elder Charles Matthews was a driver for a London cabman before 
going on the stage as an actor. 

The greatest sleight-of-hand performers were Jews — Hazlemyer, Hartz, 
Heller, Jacobs, Phillippe, Herman, Adrian and Blitz. 

Edwin Forrest was a tumbler and leaper in a circus company. John 
R. Scott was a butcher-boy. Joe Jefferson painted scenes, as well as 
acted, when a young man. Salary, SIS per week. 

Try. — Try pop-corn for nausea. 

Try sun baths tor rheumatism. 

Try ginger ale for stomach cramps. 

Try clam broth for a weak stomach. 

Try buttermilk for freckles. 

Try a hot flannel over the seat of neuralgic pain, and renew frequently. 

Try taking cod liver oil in tomato sauce, if you wish to make it 
pal atable. 

Try a nap in the afternoon if you are going out late in the evening. 

Try a cloth wrung out from cold water, put about the neck at night, 
for a sore throat. 

Try walking with your hands behind you when you find you are 
bending forward. 

Try cranberries as a poultice for erysipelas. 

Try planting sun-flowers in your garden if compelled to live in a 
malarial neighborhood. 

Try a newspaper over your chest, beneath your under-shirt, as a 
chest protector, in extremely cold weather. 

What an Old Man has Noticed. — I have noticed that all men are 
honest when well watched. 

I have noticed that diamonds, silks, furs, broadcloths, gold watches and 
chains are often bought with other people's money. 

That there is more gratitude in dogs than there is in men. 

That purses will hold nickels as well as gold. 

That mock philanthropy is like giving a mermaid a pair of boots. 

That seal-skin sacks and fine jewelry wius more women than youth and 
beauty does. 

That the most enduring love is that of a mother for her children. 

That nearly every office-seeker is the right man in the right place. 

That Christians, Mohammedans, Jews and Infidels all worship one 
God. It is spelled G-O-L-D. 

That he that takes a bad woman by her word and an eel by its tail 
may be considered to hold nothing. 

That most men choose a wife as a child does a doll, no matter if the 
head is filled with sawdust. 

That poverty is the worst banner that a man can put up. 

That life is too short to give young men advice as to who they should 
marry. 

That a handsome widow should be married, buried or put into a convent. 

I have noticed that the absent one is always in the wrong. 

That a young wife with an old man is like a light in a sick-room. 



July 26, 1884. 



OAUFORNLA ADVERTISER, 



MALE BEAUTIES. 
W. T. Coleman U oat of tfa* taut cel*bnftad of 'Frfitoo'a mala b*aa< 
ii.-*. lie b ft dun) bruiwttft, with laughing Mu« »■>•<•*. whlofa ovldantly ;il 

■k. Upon tlu- bright ■•i.i.- ttl thin,-; itTftiffht DOftft ftDtl i i ilii'l, full 

bleb it ornamented limply with ■ wilky mnttaohej he&ttendi 

itriotly t" bufttoftftft, ftnd OftO never be iiuluood t*> tekfl pftrt in .my DQOVQ 

tnt-iit tending to thf order, peeoo or morale ->f the * ii v. 
Allan Bowift A dokly aomi* blonde of the languid type, Etather lar^e 
Miix-.i oomplexiun, ■ tone, knd walks as ii 

Lion wen ftn Intolerable bore; .ttf. t-. the oynlc, but simply arrives 

at -enilitv. 

\V. H. 1.. Kuril"--- A ileuii-hriuietti-. I tegular features, pale oomplexion, 
hf.ivy .i.irk mustache end dark eyes: Is nothing if But military, and oar- 
rina austerity to the extreme, fsadmirabls ej an orator, actor, Inwyer, 
Knight Templar, Brigadier General and oounnlor; in fact ii* difficult to 
ii whlofa pharaoter he moat doth vhine. 
Dan 7ost A brunette ol the purest type. Dark oomplexion, blank 
hftir and eyes. and little abort English Bide whiskers, a mustache, adorn- 
ing, but not biding, the well cot tips of which he is bo justly proud ; well 
shaped noaa and a middle ajaed trim figure. affght be s little more care- 
ful in ilre**. and Inus a decided objection to Writing hilht deux, or being 
regarded aa a masher. 

Prank Newlands A strawberry blonde. A long, thin, pale face, in- 
clined t*> freckle, e'ean-shaved, and Bunnonnted by a luxuriant crop of 
van obfttlnate hair, which BtandB erect with indignation whenever Spring 
Will. •>■ is mentioned. Pale blue eyes, atraight nose, firmly compreased 
lips, and a general wide-awake appearance, which indicates a desire to let 
nothing that can be of advantage t<» him escape. Dislikes notoriety, and 
despises filthy Lucre :is it deserves. 

Stuart Taylor—A decided brunette. Kather florid complexion, clean- 

sinived face, excepting a heavy mustache, wicked black eyes, and almost 

wnmaniafa in his appreciation for "purple and fine linen." Is regarded as 

the very prince <>f mashers*, and is said to have been the model for the 

I statue of Apollo Belvidere. Is tired of politics, and seriously meditates 

oing superintendent of a Sunday-school. 

George T. Marye— A decided blonde of the lady-killer class. Good 

features, healthy complexion, face covered with a closely-cut, well-cared- 

for, flossy beard, blue eyes, and hair accurately parted in the middle. 

Has Senatorial aspirations, and toward that end is carefully cultivating 

I a dignified walk, and studying to make his periods in speech more rounded. 

! Detests the English, and considers it uu insult to be told that he, in the 

least, resembles a Johnny Bull. 

John T. Doyle— A pepper and salt brunette. Spare, gaunt figure, cold 
gray blue eyes, and a long rather bottle nose. Is of the Jesuitical school, 
and thiuks the end justifies the means in all cases. Though well advanced 
. in years he still clings to a childish love for hobby horses, and has rail- 
roads no the brain. 
Arthur Scrivener— A blonde of the golden typo. Slightly-built figure, 
I tall, but inclined to stoop. Carefully brushed hair, blue eyes, straight 
I nose, leg of mutton whiskers and scattered mustache. Has a tripping, 
l boyish walk, as though his high spirits could not be repressed. Genial, 
jovial and gay, his happy speaking countenance invites confidence, and he 
1 is no way backward in giving his, or in speaking his mind on the slightest 
) provocation as occasion requires. • 

F. O. Layman— A demi-brunette. Heavily-built figure, which he 
dresses with the utmost neatness and good taste, an open, frank counte- 
nance, bright blue eyes, rather thick nose and close-cut beard ; goes in 
for the role of benefactor to the human race, and to that end is perpetu- 
ally inventing fresh means of locomotion for mankind, as too much exer- 
cise on foot is not beneficial, he knowing how it is himself. 

T. P. Madden — A decided brunette, but verging on the sere and yellow 
leaf. Black hair and beard heavily tinged with gray, a faultless nose, 
black sparkling eyes, a cheerful disposition and a mirthful laugh. A tall, 
well-built figure, and was formerly looked up-m as the Adonis of Mont- 
gomery street, but he has lately changed his parade ground to Market 
street, especially of a Saturday afternoon. Is almost a fixture in the 
city, but thinks seriously of paying a visit to Yosemite, which he has 
never yet seen, some time this year. 

E. J. Coleman — A blonde, with a dash of the brunette. Blue eyes, the 
beauty of which he persistently hides with a double pair of eye-glasses, 
straight nose, close-cut beard, good figure, but which of late inclines de- 
cidedly toward corpulancy, showing that the good things of this world 
are muchly to his taste. Has had political aspirations, but is so well sat- 
isfied with the title of son in-law that he has never vigorously sought for 
any other. 

E. E. Eyre — A demi-blonde. Tall, straight figure, close-cut beard, 
curly hair, blue eyes and roman nose. Is a disciple of Father Matthew 
and a follower of McDonalds, and has twice won the blue ribbon — not on 
the turf. Is noted as a stock sharp, and at the same time as an honest 
man, and is fair and square in all bis dealings. 

Horace davis — A brunette, or was once, his hair and complexion now 
rapidly assuming the hue he most effects in dress — gray. Rather short 
in figure and heavily built, a round, full face, gray beard, gray eyes and a 
well-built nose. Is slowly working his way to the white house, which he 
hopes to attain in time, and his political speeches, while flowery, are 
noted for their telling force and great depth. 

Charley Felton — A demi-blonde. Rather pale face, with clear-cut 
features, twinkling blue eyes, straight small nose, his mustache and goatee 
quite biding the symmetrical mouth which his fair friends claim he pos- 
sesses. Politics and widows are his pet aversions, and he spends his time 
visiting the latter in their affliction (as a penance), and otherwise goes 
round doing good. 

Nat Britton — A pale blonde of the nondescript order. Colorless face, 
cold blue eyes, hooked nose and prominent chin, the latter made even 
more noticeable by the way he cuts his beard. Noted for his excessive 
good temper and free-handed generosity, and bis dislike for anything Ger- 
man, having never been known to make a quotation in a foreign tongue. 
Dr. A. F. Sawyer — A decided brunette. Dark complexion, black hair, 
rather deeply set blue-gray eyes, dark mustache and a row of beautifully 
even white teeth. Like little Georgy Washington he is unable to tell a 
lie even to oblige a lady, and is one of the most popular members of the 
medical profession in San Francisco. 

[Conclusion next week.] 



BANKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, (npltnl |>ald up. 91,730,- 
000, with powor to Incn im to jjQ.Oi 
oorner OallfornJi i , . . London. 

Branches Portland, On .. British Columbia. 

riii» Hank transacts n General Banking i:>i-in. — .v 
ttd 8pedal Deposits raoairod, I u-diu irnuiUtl srallabls in all j«ru..( 

the world, approved BUla discounted and advances made on l.'"-"' collateral 

Druwti direct iU current rate* ujioti iu Head UlUce and Hranehei*,arid ftpou IU Agent* 
a* follows : 

N\-w York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Uverpool Norlli and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland -British Linen Oampanj ; Ireland Bank of Irelaml ; Uai 
too and South America— London Bank of Hexfoo and Booth amsrlos : China and 
Japan- Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China ; Australia and 
—Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company or Sydney, Bnjriisb, SentUah 
ud Australian Chartered Bank. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital S3, 000, 000. 

WM. AI.VOKI) Prcaldeut. 

THOMAS BKOWN, Cashier | B. HVBRAT, Jr., Aw't (iwliler 

Auknth: 

New York, Agency of the Bank of CaLfnmia ; Boston, Tromout National Bank, 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Hasan, N. M. EtotbeoMlda 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia, . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Gorrespon dents in all the i-rim i 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacifl Coast 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lftko, Cincinnati, 
Port'and, 0., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg;, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Chritaiann, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital «1,500,000, Gold. PreMldent, Daniel Cal- 
lag-uau. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MORGAN; 

Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

Dirkctoks.— D. Callaghan, 0. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, Isaac Wormsor, James 
Phelan, James Hcffltt, N. Van Bergen, James II. Jennings, George A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— Loudon : Hank of Montreal, No. 9 Birchin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neumau 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York; National Bunk of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Cocmiercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market ratCB of Exchange. June 28. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 82.100,000. 

San Francisco Office, 12 l California street; London Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVEyER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England aud 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Bauking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and betweeu said cities 
and all partB of the world. June 9. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets, 

Loudon Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York IkciiIh, J. W. Sel- 
iginan & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, $0,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world, 

FRED. F. LOW, 1GN. STEINHART, Managers. 
P, N. Liliknthal, Cashier. Sept. 13. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid TJp $3,000,000. 

Agency at New York, 62 Wall street. 

Aw net/ at Virginia, Nev. 
Buys and seUs Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
e lers' Credits. Nov. 8. 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corii.r Eddy and Powell streets, San Francisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate ut current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July, 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farquharson (President), Robert F. Bunker (Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer), John Easton (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A- 0. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux. [July 12. J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

Oharles Orocker, E. 0, Woolwortli, Wm. H, Orocker, 

CROCKER, W00LW0RTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 

322 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

/lurry on a General Ranking? Rnalness. Correspondents 

\_j in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 10. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real EBtate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar and Lelbbank,No.526 California street, San 
Francisco. Officers : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— L. 
GottK Fred Roedine, Chas. Kohler, Edw. Kruae, Oeorge H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L Simon. Peter Spreckels, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISON. May 18. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER «AND 



July 26, 1884. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

'* We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's. "--Tom sioore. 

It is a sign of the times that Aida is one of the most popular of 
operas. It is a proof that musical taste has been elevated and that art 
is progressing. When this last opera from the fertile brain uf Verdi ap- 
peared, the Italians considered it the work of a renegade from old tra- 
ditions. The Germans accepted it as a surrender to the theories of Wagner, 
and the French facetiously said that Verdi had mixed saner kraut with 
his maccarunL None of these observations are correct. Verdi, at a 
mature age, discarded the foolish traditional cavatinas and cabalettas of 
Italian operas, took up the dramatic expression where Meyerbeer had left 
it in the Huguenots and the Prophet, studied the local coloring of Rossini's 
William Tell and Auber's Massaniello, and, inspired by the spirit of 
Wagner, composed his master work, Aida, as a recognition of that great 
maestro's genius. 

* * * * * 

The production of this elaborate opera by the Italian Opera Company 
now at the California is a most surprising one. To the surprise felt at 
the excellency of the performance is due, in a measure, the enthusiasm 
evoked, for it must be said that the applause has been indiscriminate and 
has been showered upon good and bad alike. The ensemble of the troupe 
is remarkable. A smoother performance cannot be imagined. Every artist 
is perfectly at home in his or her respective character. All are excellent 
actors and actresses, and give that dramatic meaning to their work with- 
out which such an opera would be a failure. The chorus, without being 
perfectly satisfactory, is effective. The orchestra is better in its reed and 
brass features, taken by themselves, than in its ensemble. The scenery 
is very pretty, though slightly faded. The costumes are rich and correct. 
In the matter of accessories, properties and supernumaries no expense has 
been spared. The mise-en-scene, therefore, leaves nothing to be desired. 

Giannini is by far the best tenor heard in San Francisco since Wachtel 
sang at the Grand Opera House. He is a dramatic tenor par excellence. 
His voice is robust and yet sweet. It is without a B.iw from the lower to 
tbe higher register. It is under perfect coDtrol and attunes itself to both 
pathetic and heroic phrases. Giannini is broad-chested and his voice is 
very powerful, but even when forced it does not lose its roundness and 
purity ofjtone. There is no effort visible in Giannini's singing. His voice 
comes from him with perfect ease and freedom. Tbe necessary dramatic 
expression of the music of E,hadames is imparted to it with ^,reat fervor. 
Giannini sang " Celeste Aida " deliriously, finishiug the romanza with a 
clear and distinct chest high B. His share of the great third act he sang 
with so much passionate earnestness, and yet within the bounds of genu- 
ine artistic singing, that he deserves a place among the foremost dramatic 
tenors of his day. Giannini is young and ambitious. He sings con amore. 
He sees a brilliant goal before him, and is working towards it with all his 
soul. Two years ago he sang in New York with Mapleson. I am told 
that he was not liked. He has either developed wonderfully since then, 
or there must have been at the time other considerations besides artistic 
ones to be weighed. 

Signora Damerini is an excellent dramatic soprano. Her voice is clear 
and pure, but its high notes are marred by a vibrato. Her method is ex- 
cellent. She phrases well. She slugs with rare expression, making of 
the character of Aida a truly pathetic one. On Monday she electrified 
the audience by her dash and passionate delivery of the emotional phrase 
in the love duet in the third act. On Wednesday she was suffering from 
a cold, but this did not sensibly affect the exquisite expression of her 
singing. 

***** 

Signor Vilmont, the baritone, has a fresh, rich voice. In volume it 
has not yet been fully developed. Vilmont is a forcible actor, and makes 
of Amonasro a character of great dramatic streugth. The great trio of 
the third act, as sung and acted by the three artists, Giannini, Oamerini 
and Vilmont, is the finest bit of operatic work presented to the public of 
San Francisco in years. From personal knowledge I can vouch its supe- 
rior dramatic and artistic excellence to the represent ition of the same act 
at the Paris Grand Opera. 

* * * * 

Signora Mestres is a clever operatic artist with the remnants of a voice. 
She sings well and acts with force, but the purity and the tone of the 
voice have departed. A few good notes are left in the lower register; the 
upper ones are mere tremulous fragments. Siguor Serbolini is a basso of 
conventional quality. The minor characters are satisfactorily sum.'. Sig- 
nor Lou'heder is an efficient chef d'orchestre. With a little more practice 
he will lead his musicians to a more effective degree of precision. In tbe 
great finale of the second act, able instrumental aid is lent by the Angel 
Island band (Sth U.S. Inf., under its leader, Chas. Fuchs), four of whose 
members perform on the long Egvptian horna. 

***** 

This company possesses a varied and extensive repertoire. Now that 
its success is an assured fact, a most agreeable succession of operatic per- 
formances is in view. It is to the credit of the public that they have re- 
cognized unadvertised merit. At the same time appreciation, to be valua- 
bly should be extended with justice and discrimination. This has not 
been the case with the Aida performances. The unsatisfactory work of 
the contralto has been aa much applauded as the glorious singing- of the 
tenor, and there has beeu no gradation of commendation accordiug to 
merit. The audiences have allowed their enthusiasm to get the better of 
their judgment. 

***** 

That most amusing entertainment, Orpheus and Eurydice, is a great 
success. It is something that will bear several visits. Vanoui introduces 
this week several new songs. She should not have left out " PUouit." 
It is the Frenchiestof Freuch songs, and she sings it with the perfection of 
chic. It is a song composed for Judic. I heard her sing it several times, 
aud the celebrated French artist never did it as well as Vanoni. The day 
will come when Vanoni will set the gay capital in a furore. The part of 
" Styx " has been cut out entirely. This is a rather serious attack ou the 
original operetta. Some of "Styx's" business was objectionable, but his 
" Monarch of Arcadia," one of the features of Offeubach's score, was ad- 



mirably sung by young Bjuiface, who assumed the character, and should 
by all means be reintroduced. The fly duet between " Eurydice " and " Ju- 
piter " has also been cut. This reduces Valium's promiuence in the bur- 
lesque, much to the public's loss. The violin solo and chorus introduced 
in the second act is by Gliick. Ida Mulle, as " Cupid," bears a marked 
resemblance to our friend in dress coat and tall hat, " Puck." It may be 
interesting to know that this cute little woman is twenty-six, has two 
children at home and a young sister under her charge. Next to Vanoni the 
brightest, cleverest actress of the troupe is Daisy Murdock. Pretty, vi- 
vacious and full of the necessary laissez aller, she is a most charming little 
body to admire. The statement that friend Charles Dungan appeared in 
this production in New York is a mistake. The part of "Adonis," men- 
tioned as having been assumed by him, was written in for him in Farnie's 
Blue tieard. Next week, new airs and new business will be introduced in 

Orpheus. 

***** 

The California Quartette — Morant, Wyatt, Holland and Wetter— is to 
return East shortly. They will give an entertainment, as a farewell to 
their many friends, on Sunday next (to-morrow), at the Standard Thea- 
tre. This quartette has no superior in modern minstrelsy. It is a great 
favorite with our theatre-goers. The four singers have always been found 
willing to assist at any and every charitable entertainment, and some 
recognition of this is due them. The opportunity is now offered the 
public. 

***** 

The Bandmann-Beaudet season at the Grand Opera House has 
attracted but little notice. Bandmann is not an agreeable actor. He is a 
man of undoubted artistic ability, but his methods of acting are marked 
by such peculiarities that there is but little desire to see him act. Louise 
Bsaudet — the delicious Little Doke, for one night only, of Ainice's troupe 
— is now a dramatic actress. She is a clever little woman, and at first 
indicated that with time she would achieve success in her new sphere, but 
from present appearances her heart is with her first love, and the atmos- 
phere of operetta envelops her even in Juliet. Nartisse, Ham f et, and 
Romeo and Juliet, form the repertoire for the week. 

* * * * n 

The charnre of bill at the Bush-street Theatre lasted but one night. On 
Tuesday the Devil's Auction was re-produced. I did not see Comanche, 
but I was iuformed that it contained some remarkable pantomimic aetiug 
by Maffit. It is probable that this company will appear for a week at 
the Graud Opera House. On Monday next Leon and Oushmau, a semi- 
minstrel organization, will be the attraction offered by Jay Rial. Their 
printing is very novel aud ludicrous. 

***** 

Helen Dinsreon is singing Oscar, the Page, in Un Ballo en Masehera at 
the Tivoli, with great success. Her voice is well suited to the fioriture of 

the music. 

***** 

Chopin almost always instructed his pupils to commence exercises 
playing the notes staccato. The staccato effected by a free movement of 
the wrist is a wonderful means of counteracting heaviness and clumsi- 
ness, The hand should be so held over the keys that the teacher, placing 
his own hand under the wrists of the pupil, feels scarcely any pressure. 
This is, besides, the kind of exercise which most certainly conduces to 
an equality of power in the fingers. It is likewise that which most 
quickly counteracts the natural inferiority of the fourth and fifth fingers. 

* * # * * 

Beethoven's piano is said to be on exhibition in London. It is the 
instrument made by Graf. The piano is a perfect curiosity. It has six 
and a half octaves, has three st'ings to the bass and four to the treble, 
and retains much of" its power. It was specially manufactured for Bee- 
thoven, and stood by the side of his Broadwood instrument, which never 
satisfied him. The authenticity of tbe Graf is vouched for. 

* * IT * * 

Nym Crinkle says : " A play should have a dramatic story, strong hu- 
man characters, iutense motives of action, a conflict of good and evil, 
crisis of conduct, suspense, passion, sentiment, humor, wit and a vexed 
and suarled experience woven deftly, and then unraveled." 
Beatc'I-ekc. 

~~CALrFORWlA~THEATRE. 

Instantaneous Success of CA5IBIAGGIO, S1ENI & LAMt'ANl'S 
GRAND ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY! 

SATURDAY (TO-DAY) MATINEE. 

AIDA! 

Monday Evening:, July 28th — IL TROVATORE. No operatic performance on Tues- 
day, Saturday or Sunday evening. 

PRICES OF ADMISSION.— Dress-Circle and Orchestra (reserved), S3; Dress- 
Circle and Orchestra (admission), $1 50 Balcony (reserved) , $1 25; Balcony (admis- 
sion), 75 cents. Box Office open daily from a. m. to 9 p. m. 

[July 20.] CHAS. L. PIEB O B, Manager. 

BALDWIN" THEATRE. 

AL. HAYMAN . - Lessee and Manager 

ggy* The Hit of the Season! To-Night. Every Evening (including SuiilI,i_\ i and 
Saturday Matinee. 

BIJOU BURLESOUE COMPANY! 

ORPHEUS A KB" EURYDICE! 

VANONI, in Three New Specialties! D1GBY BELL'S Great Topical Song! LAURA 
.JoYCH, " Don't Put On a Pious Air" IDA MULLE and DAISY MURDOCK, 
"Thou Art My Own, Love. Brieve Me." HAItRY HM'PEK'S Ballad, " Dream- 
inir " Augusta Roche, Jennie Prince, Annie Caldwell, Jennie McNulty, E. S. 
Grant and Thirty Others! Popular Prices. July 21S. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Lessee and Manager. Ma. M. B. LEAViTT | Acting Manager Mr. JAY RIAL 

t^" TO-NIGHT, 
THE DEVIL'S AUCTION! 

GALLAGHER, GILMORE * GARDNER'S Great Combination! 

THE HEltlSEKT BROTHERS! MASON AND LORD! THE CHAMPAGNE 
BALLET! THE STAIRCASE BAND! MLLE. VIALLE ! MLLE. BRAMBILIA! 
THE UUDES AND COQUETTES! 

Matinee Saturday. Monday Evening, July SSth -LEON AND CUSII.MAN. 



Jul 



CALIFORNIA AJDVERTI8EK 



: 



SPORTING. 



BtcyollnK. A merry party from the ranfci <•( tb< a Club 

b Mom l "..inity Iftll Snii.ltv. This turn .nit 

■!.o club has made under the shadow ol uonot In 
The aw ■ hour we bed the i 

■ •t •baking band* with Uapl I B woelito boat, end efter blm 

with M ' h, Neele, Day, McLaughlin, Monro, Cook, I 

berffi Pinkie* end Ihe bugler, Mr. Gibson. I ! Ii n the Son 

in. I the "-nil to mount wee given, when the party rode »' ■ 
ii.: the winding shores of Kicharaaona Bey, wheo 
■hfbiof thel pleasant sheet of weter, the road became nasty end heavy, 
end the sun, which bed for en hour been delightfully genie) in it« 
became painfully oppressive to the laboring wheelmen. From 
' i -ii to Corte Bladen there la » long, steep, rough bill, and 
foot, i ded following the wheels. For a 

while there were bellowe to mend all along the ran tea, and, aa the way- 
■ide refraehment honasa are far apart, support and cheer f'>r the inner 
Him w.i- not u abundant aa the demand. Through Rose Valley the 
otly shaded, Here the line increased its rate of 
time waa made into San U ifaaL At 1^30 p.m. the wheel* 
in -ii glided silently and gla Uy bit ■ the shaded grounds of the 8 in Rafael 
Park, where BVau Clauanneea stood on the porch of lit-r hostelry t< > wel- 
come them. ■ lopione draughts of liquid refreshments were eagerly swal 

mueaof bard riding over anoh roads, with theannal b! 

in the senitb, certainly promotes thirst, if it slackens speech. Brushing, 

and bathing followed; then lunch waa ready. Each rider vied 

\s itli the Captain in doing just it «• to the many courses that came and went 

with cheerful rapidity. The lunch was served under the branches of a 

an vine, immense bnnches of grapes hanging overhead. As they 

it ripe, the company had to content themselves with the fruit of 

the grape in liquid form, which gratefully washed down the aolid edibles. 

Afu-r an hour spent jovially around the festive hoard, the riders again 

were calls t to mount, and, after a spin tl r mvh S.iu Rafael, met and jour- 

i tme together on the afternoon train, well satisfied with their first 

i i-it in company to the fashionable Biiburb U San Rafael. 

Cricket.— Last Saturday the Merion Club played a match against an 
eleven selected from the officers of the British merchant service. The 
seamen were all at sea in batting and fielding, and the Merions had a very 
soft victory. The scores were: Merion, 57 and 91; the seamen only 
making 14 in their single innings. For the winners, Burnett made 25, 
Ben Benjamin IS, and Creighton 17. Barney Benjamin secured 7 of the 
mariners wickets. The Fhiladelphians continue to play in good form in 
England. On the 13th of July they finished and won a match against 
the ' rentlemen of Northumberland. The scores being: Philadelphia, 145 
and 11*2; Northumberland, 72 and 89. Up to the date of our last advices 
the Americans bad played 13 matches in England. Of these they had 
won 7, Inst 3 and 3 were drawn. The Australians are keeping up their 
end in England, <>n the 28th of June tbey defeated the Gentlemen of 
England, The scores being 2*20 and 210 for Australia. The Gentlemen 
of England put together 261 in their first innings, but only managed to 
score 141 in the second attempt. Dr. W. G. Grace was the only man 
who made a three figure innings during the match, scoring 107 for his side. 
On the 2nd of July the Australians defeated the Players hv four wickets. 
The scores beinc: Australia. ISO and 178; Players, 230 and 134. On the 1st 
of July Oxford beat Cambridge, as reported some time since. The scores 
being: Oxford 200 and 80 for 7 wickets; Cambridge. Ill and 177. On the 
4th of July the Australians met an eleven of England, when England 
scored 453. Of this number Scotton, who played in this city a couple of 
years ago with the English eleven, made 135. The Australians will be for- 
tunate if they can make this match a draw. To-day the Occident and 
Merion Clubs play the fourth match of the series for the Harrison trophy 
at Oakland. The Occident men have one match to the good so far. 

Pigeon Shooting.— Last Saturday the Neophyte Club had an enjoyable 
match, at Bird's Point, the terms of the contest being, as usual, 12 birds 
each, Hurlingham rules. The shooting was unusually good, so good that 
we think it is time for the Neophyte's to change their name. Messrs. 
Bennett and Kellogg made clean scores, and then tossed for first and 
second choice of medals, which Mr. Kellogg won. Four of the Club 
killed 11 — Messrs. Rambo, Haskell, Dutton and Upham ; Messrs. Pollak 
and Goodall killed 10 each ; Messrs. Piatt and I)ean 8 each ; Messrs. 
Ghapin, Roche and Brown brought up the rear, with 7. 5 and 4 opposite 
their names in order. These scores indicate that the Neophyte Club 
could select ten men who could hold their own against the other two ama- 
teur clubs, the Gun Club and the Alameda County Sportsmen's Club. A 
triangular match between the three would be interesting. On the same 
grounds, last Sunday, there was some good shooting. The first event was 
a sweepstakes match, $10 entrance, an open handicap, 15 birds each, 
Hurlingham rules, for which ten entered. Hopper, Walsh and Bassford 
made clean scores, and divided the pot. Fay killed 14 and Fisher 13. 
Rivard, Slade, Pearson and Greely withdrew. The same shooters entered 
a six-bird match, 85 sweep, and 7 out of 9 made clean scores. 
Hopper and Kivard only making misses. The clean-score men agreed to 
a freeze-out. Pearson missed his first, and Greely, in his turn, followed 
suit. This left Fay, Bassford, Walsh and Lambert. On the ninth round, 
there being no other change, the mark was put back three yards, when 
Slade and Walsh fell out. Fay, Bassford and Lambert killed 12 straight 
each, and increased the score to 36 yards, when Fay's 13th bird fell dead 
out of bounds. Bassford missed the 14th, and Lambert killed, taking 
first money, and Bassford second. This shooting is remarkable. To-day 
the Gun Club will give one of its pleasant matches, at Bird's Point, where 
there is sure to be a large gathering of their friends. 

Yachting. — These are dull times for yacht scribes. Interesting facts 
are scarce, and fiction is drawn upon to fill up space. The " tall story 
about a sea in Monterey bay making loose the cabin table of the Nellie, 
and wetting things generally below,'" is a '' tall story " of the meanest type. 
The table was never loosened during the trip. If the story-teller was put 
upon the daily allowance of water that "wetted things generally below" dur- 
ing the race, he would soon be foul for want of washing. We have heard so 
many *' stories" about the Nellie's performance in crossing Monterey bay 
that we expect to read next week that " the Nellie crossed the line at 



Banl ■ • 'i ■-!/. bottom up, with 

Mr. Mai donoe | bortly. II I \ 

laid up until I 

i 

: ithom buoy, 
for the imelli i 
■ noe wae from ■■. lee, there w ■ 

of work both on and off the wind. 
Fishing Last Saturday nigh I I 
Ing trip to the Parallom Hi.- *>a was ?erj rough, end ma 
friers, who started out full of faith and hope, w< Eekto Kan on 

Sunday morning. The few bleat with undisturbed stomachs made g I 

catohi a, returning to the city on Sunday afternoon with 600 pound-. of Hsh. 
In the bay, leal Sund ty, 1 1 found to !»• unusually muddy, 

and, as a result, the catcher were poor, [a Raccoon Straits the n 

of fish taken was unusually imall about three i nd* ] ■ i 

Harbor View there was a run of sharks all last Sunday, tutne of tin* 
anglers ita boats hauling out 30; tbesiafl being from 6 to 7 feet. Thli 
■port, although not of the highest order, is not without 
Since Sunday smelt have been very plentiful The watchman i 

steamer Donahue on Tuesday and Wedm !■■ fine catches, 

The markete are juBt now full of fish mackerel from four to five i 
ton ■ and seabaes from 20 to 40 pounds En weight but all very soft. 

Trouting. -lb-ports (hat hive ivai-htd us from San Andreas and Pilar 

citoe lakes are unfavorable. The water in San eVndreas is unusually low 
for the season of the year, and the hah decidedly scarce. In Crystal 
Springs catches of black bass have been good during the week, Bdeasre, 
Willard, Green and Zeigler each taking their limit of fish. In Webber, 
Independence and Taboe lakes there bos been tine fishing quite equal to 
the beet averages in those waters. A-tTahoe Messrs. Levi Peck, Julius 
Green and party report that they are doing well. The South Yuba, at 
Cisco, and the North Fork of the American river, near Alta, are still 
very attractive, and the size and number of tish taken continues satisfac- 
tory. The stream of the South Yuba is only three quarters of a mil) 
from Cisco station, and Alta is only '![, miles from the North Fork of the 
American, but to reach the stream there is a descent of 1,800 feet. For a 
three days trip both points are admirably adapted. Siskiyou county 
always claims attention as the season advances. This is the month for 
McLeod river anglers to make their pilgrimages to i he Mecca of < 'alifor- 
nia anglers. At Castle Lake, eight miles above Sieson's, there is now 
tine Bshing. The railroad to Hazel creek, from Bedding, is now com- 
pleted, except an iron bridge to cross Slate creek. The bridge is now on 
the road from the East, and may be put in nlace within a week. Then 
the line will be extended 40 miles beyond Reading, and afford facilities for 
fishing in the Upper Sacramento, which have been so hm^ Imped for by 
our anglers. News has been telegraphed that Fish Commissioners Buck- 
ingham and Dibbel were upset from a boat in Lake Tahoe. Of course, 
anglers expressed many regrets — that both were not drowned. 

Hunting.— We have had but few hunting reports so far. Soon after 
the opening, Messrs. Orr, Kradford and Estee had a successful hunt in 
Marin County, each getting a deer. Between the 5th and li)th instant 
Messrs. H. H. Smith and V. J. Driffield hunted for two weeks on the 
Gualala river, Mr. Smith killing 4 and Mr. Driffield 5 deer. They were 
all spike bucks. They also brought a California lion into camp during 
their hunt. Messrs. H. Walters and V. Jackson killed three bucks in the 
Santa Cruz mountains last week. None of them were in prime condition. 

Rowing matters are at a stand t-till in these waters, if the phrase will 
be allowed. 

Athletics are dull. Anticipation looks for the Merion Club's pro- 
gramme for Admission Day— that is, if the club still holds its allegiance 
to athletics? 

Wrestling will have a small boom now that Delmas is here to meet 
Cannon. 

The men of the P. R. keep hammering away at each other, but none 
of the fighting is of interest to any one outside the close adherents. 

The American Lacrosse Team, who were so successful recently in 
England, have been easily defeated by the Canadian team of Toronto. 
Why cannot our youngsters learn this game? 



Persons who desire to secure a delightful suburban home, or to make 
a promising investment, are advised to direct their attention to the an- 
nounced sale, by public auction, on the lfith of August, at VI M., of 500 
acres of choice Fruit Land situate in Haywards, Alameda county. The 
estate will be divided into 10-acre sub-divisions, and the live stock, im- 
plements, etc., etc., now on the place, will be sold at the same time. 
Those who cannot be personally present at the sale, can make airauge- 
ments, through Taggart & Dingee, Nos. 400 and 402 Eighth street, Oak- 
land, or Easton & Eldridge, No. 22 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
to have their commission executed. 



If you want a delicious drink, try the Fredericksburg brewing Com- 
pany's Kaiser Beer. It can't be excelled. 



TELEGRAPH HILL 

OBSEEVATOEY AND CONCERT HALL! 

SATURDAY, JULY 2C,th-FAREWELL WEEK 

— OF TMK PAMOI 9 - 

HUNGARIAN GIPSY BAND! 

They Will Appear Every Evening and Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday Afternoons. 

TIV0LI OPERA HOUSE. 

Eddy street, near Market.— Itreling Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Maimers. — Great Success! This (Saturday) Evening, Verdi's Grand 
Tragic Opera, in Three Acts, 

TTn Ballo in Masohera! 

MISS HELENE DJXGEON aa Oscar, Grand Chorus and Orchestra. 
Admission, 25 cents. Reserved scats, 50 cents. July 26. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26, 1884 



THE NEWS LETTER'S VIEW OP THE QUESTION. 

The Question is one of general public and particular private interest. 
It is moreover, one on which the News Letter entertains decided and 
perfectly definite views. And these views it designs at the present mo- 
ment to express in unequivocal terms. The immediate pretext it will 
take as a peg to hang its manifesto upon shall be some recent criticism of 
Mr. George William Curtis, of New York, a citizen public spirited 
enough to devote to politics a part of the time he is able to spare from his 
vocation, which is that of hired editorial-writer to Harper's Weekly news- 
paper. This periodical is not the property of Mr. Curtis. It is the pro- 
perty of a firm of publish- r?. The firm, with its own money and business 
enterprise, established the periodical with the same object that it has 
made its other business ventures— namely, to make mure money. At a 
particular political juncture the Harpers decide that the interest of their 
paper requires it to take a particular editorial line, and they instruct their 
editorial writer accordingly. The Hue happens nut to accord with that 
taken by Mr. Curtis in his personal political conduct. And we are now 
seeing him abused for -for what? We ask because really we are not quite 
sure what course his critics would have him adopt. Ought he to throw 
up his employment? That suggestion would scarcely be made by a 
school-girl of any common sense. But it is not our purpose to pursue the 
ethics of Mr. Curtis 1 position. In stating clearly what tbat position is we 
cuneeive that we have quite justified it. But the fact that it should be 
possible for men otherwise sensible to confound Mr. Curtis, the citizen, 
with Mr. Curtis, the hired writer, shows that there is sad confusion of 
thought befogging the public mind on this question; and upou this confu- 
sion we design now turning the beam of our private bullseye. 

Does a newspaper, pray, belong to its owner? or to the persons he pays 
to write for it? Granting that it may, perhaps, belong to the owner, we 
would ask — Does he print it for his own advantage? or for that of its paid 
writers? Gratuitous as these queries may appear, there is more than a 
word to be spoken in answering them. Individuals who write for the 
press are fond of identifying in some way as their own the work they sell 
to a publisher. The favorite method is to adopt a signature which they 
would have appended to their " matter," when it appears in the paper. 
Now, really, if this matter were supplied by them gratuitously, their 
claim to so much identification would be only a just one. Their work 
would then advertise the appended signature, fixing the writer's quality 
and rank in " the profession, ' until he could go into the market with his 
signature and vend bis wares. He would get the exact market value 
he had himself established for them. We seize this opportunity to an- 
nounce that the News Letter is prepared to pose on these terms of all 
unknown, ambitious genius. Our columns are open to receive any 
amount of brilliant, pungent, piquant writing (approved as such by the 
editorial judgment) to be signed by any name the writer pleases ; and for 
the insertion of such approved matter he will not be charged one cent! 
But if he ask us to buy it, and we do in fact boy it and pay him the 
money, then whose, pray, is the stuff? Is it ours? Or does the seller 
get the money and own the matter, too? If it becomes really our own, we 
think we may take the liberty of putting to it a signature of our own — 
or none, and of printing when we please and how we please, and of exer- 
cising any other acts of ownership over it. 

We do not mean to assert that the object of press writers in getting 
themselves identified with their matter is always, or usually, that of se- 
curing ulterior advantages beyond the money they are paid down on the 
nail. In a majority of cases, perhaps, little more than an uneasy vanity 
is at the bottom of it — a strained estimate of the preciousness of those 
pearls of thought and brilliants :>f phrase which hard necessity forces them 
to sacrifice to the rapacity of a publisher. Then, dear contributors, don't 
sacrifice them ! For Heaven's sake, take them somewhere else, or lock 
'em up. The News Letter abhors the thought of waxing opulent and 
indolent upon any unhallowed traffic in the jewels that are fished from the 
deeps or digged from those Golcondaa — your brains. But if you persist 
in casting them into our trough (abstracting therefrom in exchange an 
agreed equivalent in minted coin) the News Letter begs now to point 
out to you, kindly but firmly, that it insists upon becoming the owner of 
whatever it pays you for, that it regretfully but peremptorily declines to 
buy from you at all on any other terms ; that it even may — that, in fact, 
it doubtless will— on occasions "mix your babies up" in a way to harrow 
your feelings. In this matter we feel for some of you quite sincerely ; 
like you, we have known the pains, the tender cares, the harmless vani- 
ties of authorship. We could not wantonly outrage your parental instincts; 
mere humanity would restrain us ; besides, joking apart, it is to our in- 
terest that you keep good humored in dealing with us. We are proud of 
you — but: But if the editorial judgment require that a morceau from 
the pen of Pious Jones shall go to sparkle amid the other scintillations of 
our Town Crier, why—it will have to go there. 

That's all. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL OPTICS. 

A science of a very recent date, in the doctrine of the anomalies of 
refraction and accommodation, the connection between science and prac- 
tice is more closely drawn together than in any part of medicine. Many 
an obscure type of disease emerged into the clearest sight, and assumed, 
as if spontaneously, an elegant simplicity. Prof. Ponders, page 329, re- 
marks how necessary a want of knowledge it is to the correct diagnosis of 
the various defects of the eye, and how deeply it affects the whole treat- 
ment of the oculist, will come to the sad conviction that an incredible 
number of patients have been tormented with all sorts of remedies, and 
have been mutilated by inappropriate operations, who would have found 
immediate relief and deliverance in suitable "spectacles." C. Muller, 
the Optician, 135 Montgomery street, advises parents having children 
i:nmplaining of their eyes, subject to inflammation, headache, deviating 
in or out, as the case may be, to call. He will explain the cause and rem- 
edy of all such difficulties, very often the means of saving the loss of sight 
nf the deviating eye, sure to follow physical exclusion. All complicated 
c;ises of defective vision thoroughly diagnosed free of charge. Every pos- 
sible combination of lenses mounted in two hours notice. Correcting all 
errorB of refraction and accommodation in simple or compound astigma- 
tism, belonging to Myopia or Hypermetmpia and Presbyopia, the result 
i if advancing years. 

R, Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



THE BRITISH SHIP RELIANCE. 

There is now discharging at the Sea-wall the finest sailing ship that 
ever passed through the Golden Gate, and perhaps the best specimen of 
marine architecture that ever sailed out of any port. The Reliances 340 
feet over all, and 314 feet between the perpendiculars. She ia 42.6 feet 
beam, and her depth of hold is 24.6 feet. When loaded her draft is 23 
feet ; registered tonnage, 2,1 568 tons. She has four masts, three square- 
rigged, and the jigger is one piece of iron. The fore, main and mizzen 
masts are 170 feet each, from deck to truck. She spreads 13,000 yards of 
canvas. Her rigging is all of steel wire ; her topsail ties and runners are 
also of steel wire. Her hull is of iron, and the model appears to be as 
nearly perfect as the eye can demand. Her lines are as tine as those of a 
yacht, indicating unusual speed. We saw her lying in the stream a few 
days since, and looked her over fore and aft with intense pleasure. Her 
lofty spars are so finely proportioned that a seaman's eye would never 
weary in looking at them. Her carrying capacity is 4,000 tons of dead 
weight. Her crew,, all told, is 37 men. She has two decks — the upper 
iron-sheated with 3x3 planking. The Reliance was built by W. H. Pot- 
ter & Sons, of Liverpool, to the order of W. T. Dixon & Sons, of the 
same city. She was launched 12th January last, and sailed on the 2nd 
of March for San Francisco, arriving here on the 6th inst. , making a good 
average passage of 126 days, which is 12 days less than the regular time 
for the same season. 

Captain James English is her commander, and this is his first voyage 
to this port. Capt. English superintended the building of this model 
ship from the day her keel was laid, and of her equipment until she was 
docked to receive her cargo, and she does him and her owners credit in 
every way. Before she was begun, and during her construction, Captain 
English visited the principal shipyards in the United Kingdom, and 
wherever an improvement was being made in shipbuilding the change 
was incorporated into this vessel. 

One of the many new features is that the cabin is amidships. It is a 
fine, airy room, finished in light, hard wood, with a skylight built up to 
the wheel-house, which is over the cabin. The captain's quarters are on 
the starboard side, and are neatly finished, as are also the spare* room, 
sleeping and bath room. The pantry is on the port side. Forward of 
the cabin is a large and well arranged store-room. The rooms for the 
petty officers are on the port side. The forecastle is on the starboard side, 
all part of the deck-house, the finish and furnish of each being appropri- 
ate. The wheel-house and chart-rooms are finely finished, and a bridge 
runs from the main upper deck clear aft. The stearing gear is of the 
most improved patterns, and the vessel can be steered either from the 
midship wheel-house or by the wheel under the fantail, which makes 
such an ornamental finish to the stern. The galley is forward, and the 
engine house is abaft the galley. Steam is used for hoisting the anchor, 
loading or unloading and making sail, the steam pipes running from the 
capstan clear aft. The bulwarks are high, and the water ways unusually 
wide, to clear the decks of water rapidly. Below everything has been 
done to make the ship thoroughly staunch. The improvements never 
before used in a sailimr vessel are three rows of stanchions in the lower 
hold and between decks, and double-angle iron stringers to which the 
beams are fastened. Each of the four masts is tied with diagonal lies. 
She has a collision bulkhead. In the main iron deck there are seven 
panting beams, three abaft the iron bulkhead. Other features below we 
could not examine, as the cartro was being put ashore, which, by the way, 
is the largest and most valuable ever carried into this port by a sailing 
ship, and is being turned out in splendid order, which is in part due to 
the patent ventilators reaching from the deck to the lower hold. The 
carsro and ship came consigned to Meyer, Wilson & Co. 

Visitors to the Reliance will be struck with the fine figurehead, a model 
of Pegasus. Her name was given by one of her owners, a member of 
the firm of David Corsar & Sons, of Arbroth, Scotland, manufacturers 
of the well-known Reliance canvas. Since the ship arrived in port a 
stream of visitors have been down to look her over, who have all been 
welcomed by ber genial captain. But one opinion has been expressed — 
" that she is beyond comparison the finest and staunchest ship that has 
ever graced the port of -San Francisco." 

People who are looking for something really superior in the way of 
Whisky, should try those fine old brands which are manufactured by H. 
& H. W. Catherwood. These delicious stimulants have been first favorites 
in the California market since the days of '49. They are known as " A. 
A. A.," "Cranston Cabinet," "Double B," "Old Stock," "Century," 
" Henry Bull," " Monogram," " Brunswick Club," and others. Messrs. 
Dickson, De Wolf & Co. are the sole agents for these Whiskies on the 
Pacific Coast. 

Poison Oak.- A positive preventive and cure is found only in 
Dickey's Famous Creme de Lis. It also removes Tan, Sunburn and 

Freckles. 

THAMES" AND MERSEY MARU^NSURIINCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

CAPITA!, SUBSCRIBED $10,000,000 

Capital paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (In addition to capital) 1,875,000 

Total Assets June 30, 1SS3 B, 232,712 

M'JI. GREEK II A It It ISO. V. Malinger, 
[July 10.] 308 Pine street. San Francisco. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OS HAMBTTBG. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 I Asset* Jan. 1. 1SS4. 81*088,015.63 

Mii-|>m» 227.S8S.90 | Invested in the U. S. 494,234.28 

CEO. MARCUS & CO., 

232 California street, San Francisco Cal,, 

General Age nts for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains . 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital 85,000 t 000.— Agents: Balfonr, Guthrie &. Co., No, 
/ 316 California street, San Francisco. Nov. 18. 



July 86, 1884. 



lUUKORNIA ADVERTlsKli 



MARTIN LIGHTFOOTS SONG. 

ln-iirkfii. bMrkao, out!*-* nil, 
bewkea onto in.'. 
And I'll sill*- you > song of » Wood-Lyon 
Uum swimming ool ovm the sea. 

He IHUOd went, he r:uii;--l out, 

Ami f.ir aiul wide rangod he ; 
He took his* Ute oat of every beaat 

Uvm coder the greenwood tree. 
Tin 'ii by then l-:»uh' a silly old wolf, 

" . \nil I'll serve you," qnottl h<- ; 
Qaoth tin- Lyon, "My paw is heavy enough, 

So what wilt thou do for me?" 
Then by there came a cunning old fox, 

" \u«l I'll serve you," quoth he; 
QdOtfa the Lyon, "My wits are sharp enough. 

Bo what wilt thou do f<>r me?" 
Then by there came a white, white dove, 

I'lew ofl * Hir Lady's knee ; 
Sang " It's I will he your true, true hive, 

It y<m'll be true to me." 
"Ami what will yon do, you bonny white dove ? 

And what will you do for roe?" 
"O, it's I'll bring you to Our Lady's love, 

In the ways of chivalrie." 
He followed the dove that Wood-Lyon 

By mere, aud wood, and wold, 
Till he is come to a pefect knight. 

Like the Paladin of old. 
He ranged east, he ranged weat, 

And far and wide ranged he — 
And ever the dove won him honor and fame 

In the ways of chivalrie. 
Then by there came a foul old sow, 

Game rookling under the tree ; 
And *' It's I will be true love to you, 

If you'll be true to me." 
' 4 And what wilt thou do, thou foul old sow? 

And what wilt thou do for me?" 
" O, there hangs in my snout a jewel of gold, 

And that will I give to thee." 
He took to the sow that Wood-Lyon ; 

To the rookling sow took he ; 
And the dove flew up to Our Lady's boBom ; 

And never again throve he. 

—Chas. KingsUy in English Illustrated Magazine. 

A KINGDOM IN REVOLT. 

The Sandwich Inlands is threatened with a bloody revolution, caused 
by the attempt to lobby a bill through the Legislature for the establish- 
ment of the Hawaiian National Bank — an institution which would have 
owned the kingdom and the Kanakas, body and breeches. The revolt is 
led by the venerable John Thomas Waterbouse, a wealthy English mer- 
chant, whose British blood is fired with indignation at this attempt to 
steal a march upon the too-confiding red men of the isles. Yea, the grim 
god of war stalks abroad throughout Hawaii nei; the fiery poi-eaters are 
burnis'iing their swords in the tropical sun, and the white braves, robed 
in silver-fringed mrtlott, are fiercely arraying themselves in war-paint and 
feathers. The signs are really ominous, and the "sand-lotters," as the 
opposition is called by the Government, mean business. Several large 
public meetings have been held, inflammatory posters, in English and 
Hawaiian, have aroused the public to the highest pitch of excitement, 
and an address, signed by over one thousand citizens, has been presented 
to the King, respectfully requesting him to dismiss his Cabinet. In the 
meantime His Majesty remains secluded in the royal palace, and from 
this idylic retreat commands the Army and Navy, holding both in the 
capacious palm of his hand, ready at a moment s notice to hurl them 
against the kipis (rebels), who are (in words) assaulting the very gates of 
the palace. It is a standing joke that you couldn't get the old white set- 
tlers on the Islands to fight even were you to couple them together after 
the fashion of the fabled Kilkenny cats; but it must be remembered that 
there is a floating population of foreigners who would ask no better fun 
than the task of gobbling up the Hawaiian Army of seventy-five or a 
hundred men. The Hawaiian Navy is not a formidable enemy, 
being composed of something in the shape of a washtub. Our latest 
accounts from the Islands indicate that the opposition to the Gov- 
ernment is very formidable, and, with a military leader, a man of daring, 
ready to fight for and win a kingdom, could be organized into a success- 
ful revolution. The King is reported to be trembling in his raalo, while 
Premier Gibson stands the brunt of the battle, assailed on all sides, yet 
holding the fort. Our informant, just arrived from Honolulu, says that 
city was in the agonies of revolt, but is of the opinion that the whole 
thing will fizzle out in talk, as " there's no fight in the white men there." 

Gentlemen who are in search of a reliable place to replenish their 
wardrobes are recommended to try Messrs. J. M. Litchfield & Co., Mili- 
tary and Merchant Tailors, No. 415 Montgomery street. The best mate- 
rials and careful and experienced cutters and workmen can always be 
found at this establishment, and perfect satisfaction is guaranteed. Mili- 
tary, Society and Gents' Furnishing Goods are kept on hand and manu- 
factured. 

We desire to call the attention of our readers, and the public generally, 
to the fact that there is an excellent mine of mica, located in British 
Columbia, for sale. The mica can be extracted in one-foot, squares, and 
its quality cannot be surpassed. Further particulars can be obtained by 
addressing this office. This is a rare chance to obtain a valuable property. 



A magnificent assortment of Japanese curiosities and works of art 
is to be seen at G. T. Marsh & Co's., No. 625 Market street. 



INSURANCE. 



Nod. 322 nn.l 3 



HUTCHINSON A MANN, 

INSURANCE AGENCY. 

I Citllfuruln nlrvcl, Sm Frmiul-.ru, «'nl. 



AGRICULTURAL 

AM. KM \NNI,\ 

BOATMAN'S 

CITIZENS' 

FARRAQI T. 

FIREMAN'S 

GERMAN 



Fire Insurance. 



....r New York 

...«( 3) i 
.of Now 
...nf Ball 
mi Piitatmnrt 



IRVINO of n 

ICS'.... of v 

METROPOLITAN PLATE OLASSof N V 
NEW ORLEANS INS, ASSOl I I 

PENNSYLVANIA 

PEOPLE'S.... oi pUtaburih 

ST PAU1 .. f Bt Pan] 

iv ofNowOrloana 



U1RAKD of Philadalphla ... 

LONDON AND NORTHWESTERN ol Manchester. 
Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MARINE INSURANCE CO of London 

LA FONCIERE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY of parla 

Capital Represented $£7,000,000 

All Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly Paid. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON, 

320 mill 322 < allforuln street. Sun Francisco, Gal. 

HUTCHINSON & MANN* ManagsTB i W. L, 0HALMBR& Special and Ailjustor 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 180-1. 
Prinoipal Offloe 216 Sansome street. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Capital Paid Up in V. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,069 75 

Assets January 1, 18S4 87r>0,47S.I3 I Promiums,sincoorganizat'n.$4,5ill,8'27.57 

Surplus for policyholders — $752,096.78 Losses, since organization.. 81,97l\ 088 10 
Net Surplus (over everything). §352,030. 98 | 

, „ OFFICERS: 

J. P. HOUGHTON President I CIIAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGI LL General Agent 

Dikkctors ov the Home MinTAL INSURANCE Co.— L. h. Baker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L, N. Shepard, John Currey, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Watcrhouse, Cliauiiuey 
Taylor, S. Hull, J. S. Carter, H. P. Coon. April 12. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8750,000 I Assets Over $1,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I GUSTAVB TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FAKNF1ELD General Agent | N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOHEN, Surveyor. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, $20,000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, $10,000,000. 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool- Capital, $5,000,000- 
W J. ('AI.MXOIIAII & CO., General Agents, 

Aug. 12 '213-215 Sansome Street 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Oo , o£ London Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London.... Established 1836. 
Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool. Established 1857* 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
8.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building'. 

PHSNIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

England. Estab'd 1782. -Cash Assets, $5,266,372.35 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets. $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1851— Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BUTLER A- HILDAS, 

General Agents for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich. Capital 5, 000, 000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the prinoipal seaports of the world. Iu the set- 
tlement of all claims under an EngliBh policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
Juno 9. HARRY W. 8YZ, Agent, 420 and 423 California St . , S. F. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,600,000 

Cash Assets 1,709,976 

Cash Assets in United States 775,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Annus, 
March 20. 316 California Street, Ban Francisco. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER £ND 



July 26 : 1884. 



A CAUTION TO BRITISHERS. 

A few weeks ago a respectable, bulkly, elderly Scotch civil engi- 
neer arrived on this coast to inspect and report on the redwood timber 
lands— 150 square miles in area — which the California Redwood Com- 
pany has attempted to appropriate, or "grab." The object of thin in- 
spection was to confirm, or otherwise, the representations of the middle- 
man, who, for an enormous commission, are promoting this enterprise, 
as to the quantity of timber standing on the tract, etc. For all the 
world, the case is like that of the mines that are offered for sale in 
England with so many " millions in sight." To inspect property of this 
sort, an "expert" is sent, perhaps a college professor, expert in any- 
thing except practical mining. The mine is put in order for his inspec- 
tion, and after such an examination, under the tutelage of vendors, as he 
knows how to make, he reports that he has actually seen all the mill- 
ions he was meant to see. On the faith of his report some hundreds of 
thousands sterling are transferred from British to American pockets, 
and never again seen by the shareholders, who confided too much in 
the "respectability" of the channel through which the scheme was 
brought forward. The victims always forget that such schemes can be 
brought forward successfully only through respectable channels; through 
no other sort could they succeed at all. Now, it requires practical knowl- 
id..je in mining to judge the value of a mass of ore in a mine, but ten 
times more does it require practical knowledge in woodcraft to jndge 
the quantity of timber on a given area. Days and weeks of patient 
work may be reqnired to form the first estimate; but weeks and months 
of hard labor are imperative for the second. The tract to be inspected 
by Mr. Blythe for the California Redwood Company was forty miles 
lung by three to seven in width. For its proper examination, the open- 
ing of trails would alone have required weeks. Am estimate worth any- 
thing at all, must be based on survey, accompanied by a practical knowl- 
edge of woodcraft, that would have occupied weeks more. The mere 
identification of the tract to be " grabbed," could only be done by aid of 
the local surveyor, pointing out initial points, and so on. Except for the 
word of the promoter, Mr. Blythe does not to-day know that he was on 
the land at all: he does not know how much he may have Been, and we 
v enture the assertion has no certain knowledge within eighty per cent, of 
the amount of potential lumber be did see. He was in Humboldt county 
only a few days in all. Yet it need not be doubted that on his return to 
\i igland he will, in good faith, report that he saw all the timber he was 
in sant to see, and that it is on the land claimed by the company. 

We do not know where the buyers have gone for their legal advice, 
hut it appears probable they have been advised that the California Red- 
wuod Company has valid title to great part, if not all, of the timber laud 
it is attempting to sell. We can only say they have taken very bad ad- 
vice. If they are led to believe that they will receive title to the one- 
hundredth part of what they buy, they have taken very bad advice in- 
deed. It is true that vast tracts of public land have in the past been 
"grabbed " by the very device that it is attempted to practice here, but 
i be success of those " jobs " was due to connivance of the whole body of 
Land Office officials, through whom the title of the United States was de- 
raigned. More than once, latterly, when the " grabbing " character of 
entries identical with these has been exposed, the Department has dis- 
allowed them. At the present juncture of politics, there is not the shadow 
of a ghost of a chance of their being allowed. The British purchaser 
must bear in mind that such '" grabs never were made in pursuance of 
the law, but only under color of the law. They were, at all times, an 
evasion of the law, and a direct violation of its expressed intent under a 
colorable compliance with its letter. They were allowed in many cases to 
succeed, generally through lack of any opposition — the slight adverse in- 
terests having been settled with and occasionally through knavish com- 
plicity within the Department. Neither of these conditions will help 
the California Redwood Company. There is an opposition to their 
"grab " that will insist on having the ear of Mr. Commissioner and Mr. 
Secretary himself before this fraud on the law can be consummated ; it 
•vill be exposed, and in the tight of such exposure there is not an official 
walking on two legs to day who would venture to confirm the "grab." 
We put the situation this way, because it is one our English readers can 
understand, although we can assure them further that, without any 
reference to the temporary exigencies of politics, the personal character 
■ f both the Commissioner of the Land Office and of Secretary Teller is 
such that no "grab " has any chance of succeeding that is brought to their 
attention. If we appear zealous in this matter, we crave leave to remind our 
English readers of the scores of unworthy schemes originating on this 
coast from which we have warned them during our quarter century, and 
challenge their memories to cite one instance in which we have not been 
justified by the event. We appeal to a score of cases in which our better 
information has beeo disregarded, and that have resulted in disaster. 
The present scheme is destined, if it succeeds in Britain, to result in total 
loss. The California Redwood Company has no title to the land it pro- 
poses to sell. Nothing is more improbable than that it will ever have 
title. Its "grab " could not be perfected even *!f it were an American 
scheme, worked by Americans. Anti-monopoly Bentiment alone would 
suffice to defeat it. Can any body of foreigners, then, be so stupid as to 
suppose they will be permitted to violate the national prejudice and the 
law at once ? Pshaw ! We are almost tempted to exclaim that if Britons 
Itit themselves be gulled by so clumsy a scheme as this, they deserve to 
iiise ; but this would be too hard a sayiDg. What we do say, though, is 
i his : If they are gulled, it will be due to the inveterate British deference 
ti) respectability — the respectability of the channel — that appears to render 
John Bull at times as blind to the pitfall as he is deaf to the shout of 
warning. Large sums of money have already been advanced on security 
<.f the claims of the California Redwood Company. Those advances are 
lust, unless the money can be got out of John Bull, for the collateral is 
not worth the paper it is written on. 



Mr. A. F. Evans, of the firm of Messrs. A. F. Evans & Co., Commis- 
sion Merchants, is on a business trip through the Atlantic States. He 
ii now in Kansas City, and will visit Chicago, St. Louis, Louisville, Cin- 
cinnati, Milwaukee, New York, and other places. He will be gone alto- 
,e:her two months, and we can cheerfully commend bim to those he may 
meet as one of San Francisco's most enterprising business men. 

AnOld Maid's Paradise— Marrying an old bachelor worth §100,000,000. 



BLAINE'S LETTER OF ACCEPTANCE 

In accordance with time-honored political traditions, Mr. Blaine has 
signified his acceptance of the Republican nomination for the Presi- 
dency in a formal letter. Hia letter is an elaborate literary produc- 
tion, couched in clear and well chosen language, and in that respect it is 
much superior to the platform upon which it is predicated and of which 
it is an authoritative interpretation. As a statesmanlike review of the 
great questions of public policy now at issue, it is a disappointment even 
to those who agree with Mr. Blaine's theories. A very large portion of 
the letter is devoted to a discussion of the tariff issue. In handling this 
subject the distinguished writer labors under the disadvantage of being 
on that side which is opposed to correct, well-defined principles of po- 
litical economy, and is struggling to maintain those views which are sup- 
posed to be popular with the unthinking masses. It was to be expected, 
however, of a man of Mr. Blaine's attainments and unquestionable abil- 
ity, that he would exhibit a brilliancy and freshness, even in the support 
of erroneous doctrines, that would have thrown a deceptive glamour around 
the heresies advocated. He has done nothing of the kind. He has sim- 
ply arrayed, in somewhat imposing battalions, a stock of illogical plati- 
tudes and meaningless or deceptive figures, all of them stinking with 
staleness and worn threadbare with use. In one or two particulars 
Mr. Blaine's letter exhibits a boldness in ignoring common sense 
which is interesting, if not convincing. He calmly claims the 
great development in the material resources and wealth of the country 
since I860, as the result of a protective tariff. This, indeed, is the key- 
note of his whole argument on the revenue system, and in putting it forth 
he pays a very left-handed compliment to the people whose support he is 
seeking, because, manifestly, he must consider them to b« destitute of 
intelligence and reasoning faculties. It requires an astouuding degree of 
vivid imagination to place the natural development of a new country, in 
Bpite of an erroneous revenue system, as effect and cause. Common- 
place minds, however, will find some difficulty in understanding how a 
protective tariff has resulted in developing mines, or producing a large 
yearly increase in the acreage of wheat, corn and other crops, not one of 
which are protected, and all of which find their principal market abroad. 
Mr. Blaine would have been as logical had he claimed our great increase 
in population and material resources since I860 as one of the results of 
our terrible civil war and the unsettled condition of a portion of the 
country during the dark years which immediately followed it. 

In the interpretation which Mr. Blaine has placed upon that plank of 
his party's platform which calls upon Congress to remove the burdens 
which have depressed American shipping, intelligent, conservative men 
will find cause for grave alarm. In effect, Mr. Blaine announces himself 
in favor of a Bubsidy policy. We all know what that means. Subsidies, 
jobbery and Johnny Roach ! Robbing the public treasury to put money 
in the pockets of a few rich and unscrupulous men, under pretense of 
building up an American merchant marine ! This is not a new or un- 
tried theory. It has been tested in this country, and the result of the 
test was lots of subsidy and few ships. Truly, this would be removing 
the burdens which have depressed American shipping interests with a 
vengeance. 

There is one subject treated of in Mr. Blaine's letter, upon which his 
views are thoroughly in accord with intelligent public opinion, and that 
is the reform of the Civil Service. Whether ne is sincere in the views he 
has put forth upon this question, or is merely endeavoring to placate a 
very pronounced public sentiment, is a point upon which there is a clearly 
defined difference of opinion. 

The other points treated of by Mr. Blaine are in the nature of clap- 
trap, and are unworthy of discussion. Taking it altogether, this letter 
will not strengthen the writer with the thoughtful, conservative men of 
the country, and other classes will not understand it. 

A JUDICIAL FARCE. 
The course pursued by Judge Wilson, in the trial of the murderer 
Hutchings, is anything but creditable to himself or satisfactory to the 
public. This man Hutchings murdered his mistress, and then, instead of 
seeking to avoid the consequences of his rash crime, he, for reasons that 
need not be discussed, surrendered himself to the authorities and confessed 
himself guilty of a crime the brutal heinousness of which he placidly ac- 
knowledged and seemed to rejoice in. At the preliminary examination 
he waived all rights and requested to be sent before the Superior Court at 
once. He was promptly and properly accommodated, and when arraigned 
before Judge Wilson he pleaded guilty. Under these circumstances it 
was the duty of the Judge to immediately sentence this brutal and self- 
confessed murderer to that ienominions death he so richly deserved. 
Judge Wilson, however, seems to have entertained a somewhat different 
idea in regard to the duty he owed society, so he remanded the prisoner 
for sentence, and in the meantime caused successful efforts to be made to 
induce him to withdraw his plea, ask to have the proceedings set aside, 
and a new trial had. The result is that the execution of this murderer is 
indefinitely, if not altogether, postponed. In doing this, Judge Wilson 
may think that he has shown a very praiseworthy tenderness of heart. 
As a matter of fact, he has done nothing of the kind. He has simply 
made a mockery of justice and acted in scandalous defiance of any proper 
knowledge of his sworn duty to society. If he intends to retain his present 
judicial position, the learned and most amiable Judge must try and realize 
that society does not support Courts for the purpose of standing between 
hideous criminals and well deserved punishment. If the amiable Judge's 
feelings are so abnormally tender that he cannot properly discharge the 
duties of his office, be can easily get himself out of his embarrassing posi- 
tion. His resignation could be handed to the Governor any day. After 
making mockery of justice it would be in order now. 

As evidence that the people of England had attained a higher mental 
culture when Shakespeare wrote than now generally credited, proofs 
have recently transpired that Queen Elizabeth fluently read Greek and 
Latin, besides being well up in Spanish, Scotch and Dutch. Where is 
there a monarch now that can boast as much? 

We regret being called upon to announce the death nf the eldest son 
of Mr. Charles Meinecke, which sad event took place in Europe last week. 

Dr. F. P. Mann and family leave for the East July 30, to remain per- 
manently. 



Jnlj S6, 1884 



OAUKOKNIA Al>\ KKTI8EB, 



II 



TOWN CRIER. 



"BMI lha OH*t What tha d«Til art thoo I 

"Unt that will play lha davil.air wllb yoo.*' 

" 1UM * • tin* Id hla tail aa lane U * "ail. 
Which nidi him crow hoUlar and bolder." 



Know all mon by those present*: That I, tb« 7W» Cfrier< of the 

inty ol Sm l'"i tii.-i-. .■-. State ol California, being of sound 

bodily health and in full possession of my imanninfl powers, do hereby 

the following pronQnetaineota, the oonntttda of whieh yon tan 

hereby charged bo they. In view ol the existence and gradual increase of 

cholera In Prance, sad Its probable extension to other foreign oa- 

tiona, inolndlng Maw Jersey, and it* more than probable introduction Into 

V u York, Boston and other on wsshei I Kuttern hamlets, it Kvonu* my 

duty t>> r.-f iinnn'inl the nece»«ity »>f pLi.-im; . mr crocs roads in a first -el. is* 

unitary condition, in order that are may escape, if possible, the displeasure 

of this dreaded ■course. Therefore, by value of the power in me vettted, 

I do hereby command that without delay every male resident of the city 

■'inly ol Sen rfranoisOO blow his nose anil soak out his ears ; that 

every female inhabitant thereof dean her finger-nails and thoroughly 
rinse her mouth; that children of all ages have their beads oombod and 
faces washed ; that the denizens of Barbary Coast be submitted 
to a thorough disinfection by means of chloride of lime ; that 
the natives of Tar Flat be treated to a plunge-bath in the 
waters of the bay; that habitues of the region of Telegraph Hill 
be oompelled to Steep their feet in a solution of carbolic acid; that the 
Mongolian portion of the city be submerged by the united action ol the 
Firs Department; that the pools of politics (Democratic and Republican] 

rosed of their tilth; that the Board of Supervisors be mercilessly 

overhauled and shorn of its corruption; that the School Directors be 
carefully examined, and, if found to be lousy, dosed with blue ointment; 
that the municipal officers, from Mayor down to Poundraaster, be vigor- 
il, combed and wiped; that all county officers be assiduously 
purified of their rottenness and nastiness; that the Police Department be 
well smoked and mopped out ; that the Custom-house be subjected 
to leeching', cupping and scalding; that the Harbor Commissioners be 
taken violently by the heels and soused in salt water; that political rings, 
government rings, county rings, municipal rings and rings of all descrip- 
tions be destroyed by fire; that all dives, deadfalls and dens of iniquity 
be raided and annihilated; that saints and sinners, old and young, male 
and female, be elaborately macerated in strong suds and rinsed with clear 
water— to the end that the city may be regenerated and rejuvenated and 
prepared to meet not only the cholera but the small-pox, yellow fever, 
itch, blank death, St. Vitus' dance and all other loathsome diseases, and 
-fully escape contagion or contamination therefrom. In witness 
whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 26th day of July, 
a. D. 1884, in the city, county and State above mentioned. 

His 
T. (X) Crier. [Seal.] 
mark. 

I extend to Miss Josie Edwards, of Oakland, the olive branch of 
peace, and beg to offer her my congratulation and approbation. Miss 
Edwards has set an example for the young ladies of the United States, 
which ought to be carefully studied by every maiden who values her vir- 
tue and glories in her good name. The particulars of the case are that 
one Al. Carter, a " masher" and whisky drummer, was, at one time, pro- 
lific iu his attentions to the young lady above mentioned; that he subse- 
quently (masher-like) tired of her and transferred his voluble affections to 
another lady, whom hs married; that, not content with the injury he 
had already inflicted, he began to boast of alleged liberties he had taken 
with Miss Edwards, and to hold her character up to derision and dis- 
honor; that, hearing of this, Miss Edwards sought out her traducer and 
fired at him several times with a pistol, unfortunately missing him; 
that, upon being thus confronted and attacked, the masher aud whisky 
drummer took to bis heels. Notwithstanding the fact that she made a 
bad shot and therefore failed in her purpose, Miss Edwards is entitled to 
credit for her fearless defense of personal honor. 

Topics for Women.— Love knows hidden paths. Love makes labor 
light. 

Love makes time pass away, and time makes love pass away. 

Love me little, love me long. 

Love one that does not love you, answers one that does not call you, 
and you will run a fruitless race. 

Love teaches asses to dance. 

Love your friend with his faults. Lovers' quarrels are love redoubled. 

Love rules the kingdom without a sword. 

Love, knavery and necessitj- make men good orators. 

Lovers* purses are tied with cobwebs. 

Lovers think that others have no eyes. 

Love is a nine-days fever. The first love is with our hearts, the second 
is with our head. 

Love and reason seldom go hand-in-band. 

Love is like the measles. When we have it iu early life it does not 
amount to much, but when it comes late in years it is dangerous. 

If youth only knew, and age only could. 

A woman wants a man and not a money-chest. 

Love is the theme of the minstrel all over the earth. 

A Western poet has written a new song entitled " Love is Sweet." 
It is evident the wretch has never been divorced and compelled to pay 
alimony. 

A local philosopher has a high opinion of " Women as Fiction 
Writers." So have we as we glance over a stack of old love letters. 

A "Black Eagle" Club has been formed in this city. As several 
"sore " Democrats belong, it ought to " soar " immensely. 

In the early Spring of 1885 President Arthur will March 4th into 
the wonderful realms of private obscurity. 

The grape crop, it is announced, will be a little backward this year. 
This will delay the gripes crop, also. 

Why is a professional politician like a tramp? Because he takes any- 
thing he can lay his hands upon. 



Bo Would Bo An Editor. 
There once was a land, fond mother, 

And ibs bad a f«t, fat boy. 
Win. from his earUeat child! I up 

I ■■■■ t an ink pot for a toy. 

She called Ed ■ phrenologist* 

All hfa little bumps to res), 
Who said he'd b» 

\i whose feet the world wonld ki I. 

But time sped on, the boy grew up, 

And, with bead wrapped In towel. 
Wrote little nothings, woTeh he finned — 

With flourish -H. McDowell 
He strove to be a journalist 

And he got a decent place ; 
Bnt letting petty spite creep in 

Put him out in duttjraoe. 
For Harry knew a certain girl 

Who'd ducats in galore. 
But he found he had a rival, 

Which made poor Mac feel sore. 
So he meanly used the paper 

Just to write his rival down, 
Which P y, when he heard of, 

Sacked our Harry with a frown. 
Then, like his dad of Bull Run fame, 

He beat a swift retreat, 
And, like some harpless minstrel then, 

He walked the weary Btreet. 
His mother then said : " Harry, here 

Are sixteen thousand dollars 
To start a weekly paper with 

And get right to their collars." 
Then Harry started with a will, 

And he made the dollars fly 
Until bis nice full treasury's 

Seven thousand short of dry. 
So hurry back rich maiden, 

Or we fear that you will find 
Harry's weekly in "extremis," 

And no cheese left, but the rind. 
And Harry, too, himself may burst, 

Like frog in ancient fable, 
Who tried to emulate a bull 

In size, but wasn't able. 
The French Bonne is becoming more frequent on our- streets each 
year. This year the crop is extra large, as a good many of our high-toned 
people, who have lately done the " European Tower," consider it the cor- 
rect thing to bring back a French nurse. It is not every girl, however, 
who wears a white cap that is of Gallic extraction, for we overheard one 
of these dear creatures abuu'ng her squally charge in a brogue whose rich- 
ness was equal to that of the best Cork butter. 

"What was that excitement on the street just now?" we asked of 
a man who was just leaving the Bcene of action. " O, only a runaway 
team," he answered, as he leisurely strolled away. His words were sim- 
ple, but what a satire they contained upon our street authorities, who al- 
low horses to stand unhitched at nearly every door, like packets of dyna- 
mite apt to go off at a moment's notice. 

A certain Undertakers Association advertises that from 25 to 50 
per cent, can be saved on all purchases (a most delicate way of saying 
coffins), and that they will furnish the most stylish turnouts. It seems 
hard to connect the latter polite terra with a hearse. If they had said 
sombre turn-ins it would have been more appropriate. 

A Walla Walla man, who evidently has small regard for his souI'r 
salvation, claims to have picked over 8,000 pounds of strawberries from 
less than two acres of vines this season. I have great admiration for 
this man's business tact. I trust he will find a purchaser for his farm at 
his own price. 

If my memory is not playing me for an idiot, the firm was known as 
Grant & Ward before the failure. As Mr. Ward is the only member in 
prison, I am led to believe that the partnership is dissolved. Liabilities, 
§16,792,647; actual assets, §67,147. Pass me my thinking cap. 

Mr, Blaine's Letter of Acceptance contains over six thousand 
words, and already over six millions of lies for and against it have del- 
uged the American people. We hope Cleveland's letter will be shorter, 
or else the " father of lies" will have to take a back seat. 

In England, during the time of the Tudors and Stuarts, there was an 
officer of the Court known as the " King's Cock Grower." The thing was 
never transplanted in America until recently, but now it is fashionable to 
have "Cleveland Crowers" and "Blaine Growers." 

The era of miracles is not entirely relegated to oblivion. A tele- 
graphic dispatch conveys the startling intelligence that Ben Butler, upon 
his arrival in Washington, refused to talk. I am now prepared to hear 
that my Democratic friends are refusing to drink. 

A Colusa girl banged her hair in the forenoon, banged her beau in 
the afternoon and sang the " Star Spangled " Banner at a church sociable 
in the evening. That girl is about as entertaining as a country brass 
band or one of the Call's editorials. 

Should all Mr. Blaine's book-agents vote for him, I fear tbe Demo- 
cratic candidate would be left in the lurch. "O that mine enemy had 
not written a book," may yet be an appropriate complaint for Mr. Cleve- 
land to utter. 

Why is a certain stall in the California Market, on a Saturday morn- 
ing, like Telegraph Hill on a Sunday afternoon 1 Because there are more 
calves to be seen there than anywhere else. 

The California delegation did not succeed in getting Thur-man. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 26 : 1884. 



C. P. R. R. 

Time Schedule- Tuesday, July 1st, 1884, 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 
Ban Francisco as follows: 



LEAVE 
(for; 



DESTINATION. 



J ARRIVE 
\ (from) 



:00 A.M. 
:00 p.m. 
:00 P.M. 
;00 A.M. 
80 A.M. 
30 P.M. 
:00 a.m. 

00 P. M. 

00 a.m. 
00 P.M. 
30 P.M 
00 P. H 
30 A.M. 

P.M.!. 

A.M.'.. 
:00 p.m. 1 ., 
:30 p. m. 

A.M. 

0f>P.M. 

:30 a.m. 
.30 p.m. 
;00A.M. 
30 P.M. 
:00 p.m. 
:30 a.m. 
:00 a.m. 
00 P.M. 
00 P.M. 
U0 P.M 
00 p.m. 
.00 a.m. 
:00 A.M. 
00 A.M. 
30 A.M. 
.00 A.M. 
:00 P.M. 

.00 P.M, 

:00 p.m. 

30 A.M. 
00 A.M. 
:00 P.M. 

00 a.m. 
30 A.M. 
:00 P.M. 
:00 P.M. 
00 P.M. 
:00 A.M. 
:00 P M. 



..Byron and Martinez . 

. .Calistoga and Napa.. 
..Colfax 



I Deming, El Paso ) Express... 

(and East j" Emigrant 

j Gait and \ via Livermore. . . , 
I Stockton j via Martinez — , 

..lone 

. . Knight's Landing , 

. . Los Angeles and South , 

. Livermore and Pleasanton. . 



( Merced, Madera, I 



j Fresno and Tulare . 

, Marysville and Cbico 

( Mojave, Needles I Express . . 

(and East ("Emigrant 

.Niles and Hay wards 



j Ogden and I Express 

\ East f Emigrant 

j Red Bluff )viaMar sville. 
( and Tehama t" via Woodland. 

..Redding 

..Sacramento via Livermore.. 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia 

" via Benicia... . 
. . Sacramento River Steamers. 
. . San Jose 



.Vallejo., 



.Virginia City.... 
.Woodland 



0:40 p.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

10:10 a.m. 

■jl>[40 P.M. 

•1-2:10 p.m. 

0.10 A.M. 

*10:10a.m. 

0:40 P.M. 

6:40 p.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

6:10 A.M. 

5:40 p M. 
*12:10p.m. 

5:40 P.M. 
10.10 A.M. 

9:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 
*8:40 A.M. 
'1-2:10 P.M. 

9:10 A.M. 

5:40 p.m. 

9:10 A M. 

0:10 a.m. 

5:40 P.M 

3:40 P.M. 

&:40 A.M. 
*S:40 a.m 

7:40 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

6:40 P.M. 

6:40 p.m. 

5:40 P.M. 

6:40 P.M. 

7:40 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 
*6 :00 a.m. 
"3:40 p.m. 
13:40 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 

6:40 P.M 
"12:10 P.M. 

9:10 A.M. 
10:10 A.M. 

7:40 a.m. 

6:40 P.M. 
10:10 A.M. 



Train leaving San FranciBCo at 7:00 a.m. can meet 
Pacific Express from Ogden at Oakland Pier: and that 
leaving at 8:30 a. m. can meet Pacific Express from The 
Needles and El Paso at Oakland Pier. 

'.Sundays excepted. JSundays only. 

TDaily from Martinez. Snndays only from Byron. 



LOCAL. FERRY TRAINS. 
From "SAW FBASCISCO." Dally. 



To EAST OAKLAND-»6:00, *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8 
8:30,9:00, 9:30, 10:00. 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:,' 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, '12:00. 

To KRU1T VALE— '6:00, -'6:30, *7:00, *7:30. *8:00, "8:1 
"3:30, *4:00, *4:30, *5:00, «5:30, *0:00, *0:80, 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda) — *9:30, 6:30, (U? 
•12:00. 

To A LAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 9:' 
9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, tll:30, 12:00, (12:30, 1:' 
{1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:: 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — "6:00, »6:30, 7:00, - 7:30, 8:00, <*:; 
9:00, (9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 19 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:< 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— »6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:80, J8;i 
8:30, 9:00, 10:00. 11:00, (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, "4:: 
5:00, «5:30, 6:00, '6:30, 7:00. 



To "SAN FJBASC'SCO." Pal ly . 



From FRUIT VALE-<-<s:23, «6:53, »7:23, "7:53, <'8:23, 
"8:53, "9:23, "10:21, "4:23, "4:53, *6:23, *5:53, '6:23, 
"6:53, 7:25, 9:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda>-»5:15, "5:45, (6:45, 
9:15, "3:15. 

From EAST OAKLAND -*5:30, "6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 
6:30, 0:u0, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:51, 9:57, 10:67. 

From BROADWAY. Oakland -»5:37, »6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 
7:37,8:07,8:37,9:07,9:37,10:07,10:37,11:07,11:37,12:07, 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 5:07, 
5:37,6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:00, 10:06, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— »5:22, "5:52, "6:22, 6:62, *7:22, 7:52, 
"8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11:52, 
(12:22,12:52,(1:22, 1.52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
5:22, 5:52, 6:22. 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:62. 

From BERKELEY -»5:15,*5:45, "6:15, 6:45, »7:15, 7:45, 
♦8:15, 8:45, (9:16, 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:15, 5:45, 6:16, 6:45, 
7:45, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. 

From WEST LliKKELEY— »5:45, »6:15, 6:45, »7:15, 
7:45, 8:45, (9:15, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 
4:45, »5:15, 6:45, «6:15, 6:45, "7:15. 



•Creels Route. 

From SAN FKANCISCO— «7:16, 9:15, 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 

5:16. 
From OAKLAND— *6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 12:15, 2:15, 4:16. 



•Sundays excepted. tSandays only. 



" Standard Tine" furnished by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
A. N. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Geo. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 

COMMMENCING May 4, 1884. and until f"rther notice, 
Boats ai.d Trains will leave from and arrive at San 
Francisco Passenger Depot, MARKET-ST. WHARF, 
as follows: 



Leave S. F. 



Week 
Days. 



5:00 p. m 
6:30 p. m. 



7:40 A. M. 
5:00 p. M. 



Sundays. 



8:00 A. M. 
5:30 p. M. 



Destination. 



Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa & 
Way Stations. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Arrive in S. F. 



10 A. M. 
6:45 p. M. 



8:50 A. M. 
6:10 P m. 



7:40 a. M. |8:00 A M. 


Gucrnevillc. 


|6:45P. M.|C:I0 p. m. 


Exc pt 1 1 
Satur- 
days. 
3:00 p. m.|«:20 A. m. 


Donahue. 


1 1 

|7:00p. m.|10:OOa.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol and Mark 
West Springs. At Clairville for Skagjjs Springs, and at 
Cloverdale lor Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Bartlett Springs, Ukiah, Eureka, Navarro 
Ridge, Mendocino City, Westport and the GeyBers. 



EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturday to Monday, 
to Petaluma, §1 75 ; to Santa Rosa, S3 ; to Healdsburg, 
84 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 



EXCURSION TICKETS good for Sundays only.- 
Petaluma, SI 50 ; to Santa Rosa, S2 ; to Healdsburg 
to Cloverdale, S4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 



From San Francisco to Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days— 7:40 A. H., 9:20 A. M , 2:00 P. M., 5:00 
p. M., 6:30 p m ; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 9:30 A. M., 12:00 H., 
2:30 P M , 5:30 p. m. 

To San FranciFco from San Rafael, Week Days -5:40 
A. M., 8:00 a. m., 10.30 a. m.,3:10 p. m., 5:10 p. m.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 A. M , 10:45 A. M., 1:10 p. m., 4:00 P. M., 
5:50 P. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days— 
6:10 a. m., 8:20 A. M., 10:50 a. m. 3:30 p. M., 5:33 P M.; 
Sundays 8:35 A. M., 11:05 a. m., 1:30 p. m., 4:20 p. m., 
6:10 p. m. 



ARTHUR HUGHES. 

General Manager. 



PETER J. McGLYNN, 
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



Saucelito— San Rafael— San QuentiD, 

—VIA — 

NORTH PACIFIC COAST 

RAILROAD 

TIME TABLE. 

Commencing Monday, May 12, 1884, and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains ivill 
run as folloivs: 

For SAN RAFAEL and SAUCELITO (week days)- 
7:30, 9:15 A. m.; 1:30, 3:20,4:50,6:15 p.m. (Sundays)— 
8:00, 10:00, 11:30 A. m.; 1:30, 4:30, 0:30 P. M. 

From SAN RAFAEL (week days) - 6:15. 7:45, 9:20 a. 
m ; 2:00, 3:25, 4:50 p. m. (Sundays)— 7:55, 10:00, 11:30 
A. m.; 3:15, 4:30, 6:30 p. m. 



From SAUCELITO (week days)— 6:45, 8:15, 10:00 A. 
M.; 2:30, 3:55, 5:30 p. m. (Sundays) -8:30, 10:30 a. m.; 
12:00 m.; 3:45, 5:00, 7:10 p. m. 

Extra Trip— From Saucelito, on Saturday, at 7:00 p. M. 



7:30 A.M. and 1:30 P. M.— Daily, Sundays 
excepted, THROUGH TRAINS for Duncan Mills and 
Way-Stations. (Through trains from Duncan Mills ar- 
rives in S. F. at 10:30 a m and 6:00 p. m.) 



Sla^e Connections. 

Stages leave Duncan Mills every morning except Mon- 
days, for Stewart's Point, Gualala, Point Arena, Cuffey's 
Cove, Navarro, Mendocino City, Caspar, Noyo, Kibe- 
sillah, Westport and all points on the north coast. 



hatnrday to Monday Excursions, 

Excursion Tickets sold on Saturdays, good to return 
following Monday: Fairfax, $1; Camp Taylor, §2; Point 
Reyes, §2.60; Tomales, S3 50; Duncan Mills, S4. 



Snuday Excursions. 

8:00 A.M. (Sundays only)— Excursion Train for 
Duncan Mills and Way-Stations. Returning, arrives in 
San Francisco at 7:40 p. m. 

Fares for Round Trip: Camp Taylor, Sl:75 ; Point 
Reyes, §2. Tomales, S2.50; Duncan MillB, $3. 

DAVID NYE, ■ F. B. LATHAM, 

GenT Superintendent, Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 
GENERAL OFFICES, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET. 




Summex" Arrangement. 

Commencing Sunday, May 4, 1884, 
And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passengor Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streets),as follows: 



8:30 A.M. 
t9:30 A M. 
10:40 A.M. 
*3:30p.m. 

4:25 p.m. 
"5:15 p.m. 

6:30 p.m. 
;il:45 p.m. 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 
8. F. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,. 
and Menlo Park 



c»:-lO a.m. 

* 8:10 a.m. 
1 9:03 a.m. 
,♦10:02 AM. 

* 3:36 P.M. 
t 4:59 P.M. 

\ 6:00 p.m. 
t 7:50 p.m. 
't 8:15 p m. 



8:30 A.M. j ( ~\ | 9:03 a.m. 

*3-30pm J -Santa Clara, SanJoseand.. [ ;! l ^t■ M ■ 
4^25 Sli -Principal Way Stations... \\ f*™> 

1 ^ ^ ) 't 8:15 p.m. 



10:40 a.m. I 
*3:30 p.m | 



Gilroy, Pajaro, Castroville I -'lO:^ a.m. 
...Salinas and Monterey ... f 6-00 p.m. 



11 10am || ..Hollisterand Tres Pinos. 



3:30 P.s 



I / Watsonville, Camp Goodall, \ 
10:40 A.M. J Aptos, New Brighton, Soquel ( 
"3.30 P.M. "j (Camp Capitola) and Santa f 

j (Cruz ) 



10:02 a.m. 
6:00 p m. 



10:02 a m. 
6.00 p.m. 



10:40 A.M.I... Soledad and Way Stations...! 6:00 p.m. 



+ 7:50 a.m.N .-Monterey and Santa Cruz., j \, g ^ 

|( (Sunday Excursions) .... > | 

•Sundays excepted. tSundays only. tTheatre train 
Saturdays only. 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, and PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS Stage 
via Santa Clara, which connect with 8:30 A. M. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS —At Reduced 
Rates — to Monterey, Soquel, Santa Cruz and Pesca- 
dero ; also to Gilroy, Parais j and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

r- c a . ™i , ( Sold Sunday Mornixg ; good for 
For Sundays only, j Rotun| game day 

For Saturday, ( Sold Saturday and Sunday only ; 
Sunday and-j good for Return until followii g Mod- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip c „„ Sat to Round Trip - 
from San SSf Mon. from San 



Francisco to 



San Bruno.. 

Millbrae 

Oak Grove, . 
San Mateo. 

Belmont 

Re '1 wood., .. 
Fair Oaks... 
Menlo Park 
Mayfield.... 



75 

1 00 

i no 

1 25 
1 25 
1 25 



i -,o 

65 
90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Franci co to 



Mount'nView 
Lawrences. .. 
Santa Clara . 
San Jose.. . . 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
I Monterey . . . 



gl 5(1 

1 50 

1 75 

1 75 

2 75 

3 00 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 

?2 00 
2 25 
2 50 
2 50. 

4 00 
6 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. Passenger Depot, Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

^~ SOUTHERN DIVISIONS. ^ 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Schedule. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

(Branch 8. JF. and N. P. R. JR.) 

Boats and Trains Leave Sin Francisco as follows: 

3. (~\ (~\ v M., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
,\J\J INGTON-STREKT WHARF, f 



of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 



, for the Town 



Sunday Excnrsions. 

8.QH a- «■ (Sundays only), from WASHINGTON- 
.^\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen a-id Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets: 
To Souoma, SI; to Glen Ellen, SI 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Ast. General Manager. 



The marriage of the Hon. Hallam Tenny- 
son, eldest son of Lord Tennysou (the poet Lau- 
reate), with Miss Audrey Boyle, only daughter 
of Mr. Chas. Boyle, was solemnized in Henry 
VII. 'a Chapel, by special license, recently. The 
Lord Chancellor and the Countess of Selbourne 
and daughter, the Premier and Mrs. Gladstone, 
and Eight. Hon. Ct. J. and Mrs. Goschen were 
present. Four or five hundred priviledged spec- 
tators were seated in Henry VII. 's Chapel. 



July 86, 1*81 



*- 



PASSING REMARKS. 
Looking over some old pamphlets, » few days w, I found one 
whloli give* the hUtory of that f*i .ry known as " Ml 

Dixnn'i Line " During U osntury there wen andlau 

cUmnstooe u to their geographical limiu, betwMO ill*' provinoM <>f Mn 
ryUnd and PennayKanin, ting loirmed oonfllota, whan the 

Cathalk hfarylnnden would give th« battle-ory. " Hey for SaJnto-Marie! " 
and the st.ru PuriUuu would answer back, " In tin- name of God, fall 
onl" tt waa finally agreed, in 1763, that Ohajlai Mason and Jeremiah 
Dixon, two Ei bould run tic- bonndary line and settle 

the qneation forever, For four years they nude, their way through the 
i\ last were obliged u> Btop, having reached the [odlan war- 
path, al a point two hundred and forty-four miles from the Delaware. 
The prominent purl this line of survey nub* quantly played in the biatory 
• •f this country need not be recited here. Founders of empires have been 
ten, but the names of these two modest surveyor** will be known 
until the end of time. 

• * • • • • 

In the Bast, where the Anti Maim- I.' 'publicum? are numbered by the 

it. Is. it in not difficult for them to stand by their principles, iu the 

hoe of partisan enthusiasm. Being in number* ami duly organised, they 

impart force ami courage, one to another, and make Kea-son's struggle 
with Sympathy an easy one. Here in San Erancieco, we Independents 
are but a handful, and every man is by himself. Under such condi- 
tions, the severing of party ties, however temporary it may be, is a pain- 
ful operation. There is to the love of every Republican for his party, a 
touch >>f idealized patriotism. A something that appeals to the heart alone. 
A lingering remembrance of our saved nationalism. A leaning — generally 
nnconfeased -towards ECnow-NothiDgiem. When forced by principle to 
turn our backs on our political associations, and our faces to our old-time 
enemy, these sentiments asaert themselves, and it requires determination 
to fight them down. We are placed in a dilemma. We don't wish to 
become Democrats, and we can't give our aid to elect a man who to us is 
the incarnation of everything that is despicable in American politics. For 
a man who desires purity in politics, and houesty iu government, a ballot 
cast for lilaiue would be a paradoxical vote. Recognizing Cleveland's 
Hrmnees and his independence, we would willingly see him as the Execu- 
tive, could it be done without indorsement of the elements that have 
nominated him, but we don't wish to support a party we despise. 
Abstention is merely evading the question. We are, I repeat it, in a di- 
lemma. An independent nomination would help us out of the fix, but it 
is not to be. The N. Y. Conference has declared for Cleveland. The 
alternative of two evils is the prominent feature of national election?, 
and this year it is presented to us in a way as deplorable as it is disa- 
greeable. 

* • * * * 

At the Aida performance, last Monday evening, a few of us were en- 
gaged in an animated discussion on Wagner and his influence on the 
musical world. To me, he is one of the greatest geniuses that ever lived. 
From the beginning of his career, he conceived the idea to wed music, 
poetry, dramatic action and spectacular effect so closely together that 
what i.e represented by this combination should become realism itself. 
Opera to him was not the stringing together of pretty tunes with simple 
rhythmic aud conventional harmonic accompaniments, with feeble lan- 
guage set to them — the combination so meaningless that were the arias, 
cavatinas and caballetas to be drawn, grab-bag fashion, from the score 
and assigned to the different phrases ami sentences of the libretto similarly 
selected, no incongruity would result. To him language was as great a 
factor as music, and he allowed the spoken word as broad a basis as the 
entoned sound. The word was worthy of musical harmony, if musical 
harmony was worthy of the word. To combine these two he had to create 
noble words, in order to clothe them with harmonious sounds. But there 
was a third factor to his combination ; noble words are only spoken by 
noble cnaracters, and these he had to create first. The present age offered 
him not what he needed, the medirevel age neither, and so he went back 
to the great mythological forms of Germany, those giant characters that 
are symbolical of all human virtue, all human strength, power aud daring, 
and, be it said in the cause of truth, all human weakness also. Out of 
them he fashioned his heros and heroines, and into their mouths he put 
the great and noble words he wanted to wed to his music. This was, 
positivefy, the grandest conception of Richard Wagner. The rest came 
of itself. The fourth factor of the combination, the spectacular, followed 
as a matter of course. The heroic figures, singing noble words set 
to glorious music needed fitting surroundings. Spectacular completeness 
had to be brought about. Then Wagner thought his theme complete ; 
the harmony of sound wedded to the nobility of language framed in the 
perfection of setting. Of the musical part of this wonderful combination 
it is needless to speak. Wagner's work in this respect is too well known. 
There is not a possibility of harmony that he has not evolved. His 
themes are the perfection of melody and he has subjected them to the most 
involved contrapuntal treatment. With him the orchestra was not a mere 
subsidiary, but a co ordinate element. Wagner has been attacked by 
his contemporaries and brethren in art more than any other musician that 
ever lived, because he had a decisive firmness and a dynamitic way of 
forcing his intentions, without regard for the ranks he split asunder, for 
Ids powerful genius pointed only to the luminous projects he would con- 
quer. But it is the fate of every great man, whose mission it has been to 
mark an epoch in the time of art, to be the subject of contemporary abuse. 
I will quote a few lines from a recent letter of Liszt's to illustrate the in- 
fluence of Wagner on the musical world. " What warm-blooded music 
this so-called ' music of the future ' is. Like a mighty gulf stream it dif- 
fuses its passionate warmth through the ocean of music, so that even its 
foes have to follow i's current, though it be against their will." 

* „ " # * * 

In the discussion referred to, which suggested these remarks to me, my 
opponents unwittingly surrendered, bag and baggage, when they admitted 
as the two operas they preferred, Faust and Aida. Gounod is a follower 
of Wagner's musical teachings, if not of his dr -matte theories. The 
principle of orchestral melody, as distinguished from vocal, finds in him a 
glorious exponent. Verdi composed Aida in the Wagnerian spirit, with 
fixed purpose and determined intent, as a tribute to the Great Maestro. 

Clairbeau. 



OALIITORNLA ADVERTISER 13 

SOUTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 



I'uavnircr Tmliu l»i. SUli FOOT OF MAHKKT siki.i I, BOOTH MHK.»l: 

8.0(~v a. m. dniiv .Alnmlo, \.»..rk, OtntnTllto, Alvlao, Bulla din, BAN 
• CJV -' .Ins; -AVIA I III /. 

niul all w v. si Parlor! 

O-OA p. m (moodI snii.i ! i, K\|.rt-« \it Bdsn, Alfindo, H 

^• OM - y villi'. Alii-.. Auih-ii '«, Suntii Cliini, SAN J08K, l/.» (JiiUm mid nil 

SullmiM [,. SANTA CHI 

X *Q/*\ I'. M. ilnily f..r SAN JOBB, L(M G*tM Hid IllUinncdlillc point*. 

^ -^ V - / S, it: ml ..i - .in.! S In- La Silil.i CrilZ. 

<fcp? liXi'l lisniNS I.. SANTA I HI /.uml Hi 50 111 SAN JOSE 00 SATI IIHAYS 
■+>° Mill SUNDAYS. I,, rulurn until MONDAY, i... 

8-ClCl * H.-BVBRY srSDAY, KXCl HsniN t.i s\N JOSH, mi; > 
■ V - / N^' an. I SANTA CUT/.. 
83 to IhV Tri'tii* un.l Suntu Cm/; 91 75 t'. Santa Clara and San Juno. 

TO OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA. 

§0:00-10:30— 87:00— 7:30— 8:00-8:80— 0:00-0:30—10:00-10:30 -11:00-11:30 a. h. 
« !■.... -12:80 11:00 1:80 « ! :O0 -'::10— 3:00— 3:30— -1:00 -4:30- -6:00-5:40-0:00— 
U::W— 7:00-7:30-8:30— 10:15— 11:15 p. m. 

Fn.tn Fcll'KTKENTH ASH WEBSTER STUEETS, OAKLAND: »6:SO-|P:0O - 
§u:30-7:0O-7:30-8:0O-8:30-!):O0-0:30-10:O0— 10:30-"; 11:00-11:30 a ». llj.110 
— li::io-«li:00— 1:30 — 2:00- 2:311 — 3:00— 3:30— 4:00-4:3n 6:00—5:30-0:00-0:30— 

7:00-7:30-9:30-10:45-11:45 Y. U 

From HIGH STREET. ALAMEDA: §5:10-$5:4O -50:10 0:10-7:18-7:40-8:10- 

8:48 0:10— 0:40— 10:10— Hlo:4fl-U:W-1|ll:4ii * «• 18:18— HIM*— 1:10— 1:40- 

•i:iil--J:48-8:10-3:40—4:;o— 1:10-6:18— 5:10-0:10-0:40. 7:10-0:10-11:31 p. m. 

^Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays and Sundays only. 

TICKET. Telegraph and Transfer OIBco, 222 MONTGOM ER Y ST. , San Francisco. 
L. FILLMORE, Supcrintcndi-iit. R. M. GARRATT, G. F. un.l 1'. Afcnt. 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Jlejtrescnted by: 



AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO 

32 BtVER STREET. 
Chicago, Illinnn*. 



AGENCY OF 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

Flavel's Warehouse, 

Astoria, Oregon. 

MR. ETJOENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSQATE STREET WITHIN, 

LONDON, E. C. 

Sau Francisco and New York. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

■[Jon. 11] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

H. B. Williams. A. Chesebrouod. W. H. Dijio.nd. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

UNION BUILDING JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, 
from New York and Uoston, and " 



"The California Line of Clippers,' 
' The Hawaiian Line." March ii. 



C. ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants, 
SAN FRANCISCO and NEW YORK. 

gig" Agents of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California. Jao- 17- 

THOMAS PRICE, 

CHEMICAL, LA.BOR.A.TOR.Y, 

Assay Office, Bullion Rooms and Ore Floors. 

63f" Coin Returns on all Bullion Deposits in 34 Sours. 

Car ful Analysis made of Waters, Industrial Products, etc. Mines examined and 
reported upon. Consultations on 0, es, Metals, Chemical and Metallurgical subjects. 

524 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No. 310 Sansome Street, 

San Francisco, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Hold Medal, Paris, 1878. 

S~ old by all Stationers. Sole Agent for the United Mules: 
MR. HENRY HOE, ill John street, N. Y. Jan. 5. 

~ BOZO RADOVICH, 

Importer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Fine Wines and Liqnors, 

29 Geary street, San Francisco. 

California Wines for Family use a specialty. May 3. 



HASTINGS' COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

The BTexi Session will Open on Thnrsilay, Angnst 7th, at 9 
O'clock A. M., in the HALL OF THE PIO.NEKK SOCIETY, on Montgomery 
street. Examinations for admission and deferred examinations on August fcth, 7th 
and 8th, at 9 a. m., in the same place. Applications for admission should be made 
to the Dean, at his office, No. 418 California street, San Francisco. 

[July 19.] ROBERT P. HASTINGS, Dean. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER* AND 



July 26, 1884. 



THE CHOLERA. 
The sudden outbreak of cholera in France and its probable extension 
throughout Europe naturally (rive rise, even in this remote locality, to 
mai y interesting questions. Will it cross the Atlantic and invade New 
York and other Eastern cities ? Is it possible that it may find its way to 
the Pacific coast? Are there any means by which we may hope to ar- 
reat its progress, and, should it unfortunately attack us, are we prepared 
to resist it with success ? Has any advance been made in our knowledge 
of its nature, and have we any better prospect for successful treatment 
than we had thirty years ago? 

It must be admitted that until within the last few months the essential 
cause of cholera was an unsolved mystery. It was called a germ of 
zymotic disease because, like small-pox and scarlet fever, it seems to grow 
and propagate in the human body and to spread from person to person. 
Whenever it has left its Indian habitat, it has invariably followed the 
great lines of human intercourse, aod, when once fairly on the march, its 
progress has never been stopped, neither by most stringent quarantine or 
by *" cordons militaires," which apparently put an end to personal and 
commercial intercourse. More than once physicians have announced the 
discovery of a special germ, but this gtrm was never isolated, no exact 
tests of its nature and properties were ever made, its form was not accu- 
rately known, and, in fac v -, its very existence was a scientific guess. 

All this, however, has been changed by the surprising discoveries of the 
German Cholera Commission, acting under the direction of Dr. Koch. 
The appearance of the cholera germ has been accurately described; its 
location in the body is known. It has been cultivated outside the body 
and completely isolated. It has been proved that its deadly qualities are 
not destroyed by cultivation, and that when the pure cultivation is intro- 
duced to the. bodies of certain animals all the effects of true cholera are 
reproduced, and the germ itself is indefinitely multiplied. Koch's re- 
searches have now been verified by Dr. Vandyke Carter, one of the most 
distinguished physicians in the Indian medical service, and that tbey have 
been indorsed by: Vichow and Pettenkofer ought to be a sufficient guar- 
antee of their truth. It is a significant fact that Dr. Koch has received 
the decoration of the Legion of Honor from his French opponents, as an 
acknowledgment of his vast discoveries. 

What, then, is the origin and nature of cholera? And, first, we may 
note that it does not originate in Europe or America. In these countries 
there prevails in Summer time a form of cholera. Diarrheal may be gen- 
erally prevalent in a district, the soil of which is saturated with organic 
matter. This diarrhcea may assume all the symptons of genuine cholera, 
vomiting, diarrhcea, cramps, rice-water evacuations, collapse and sudden 
death. But these are but evidences of gastric intestinal irritation, such 
as might ensue upon the introduction of a poison. But there is no evi- 
dence that this disease is capable of propagation, and if the persons at- 
tacked be removed from the influences which gave rise to it tbey will not 
communicate the disease to their new neighbors, living under conditions 
favorable to health. The true cholera germ is, therefore, a product of 
the East. When it appears in Europe or America it has been brought 
there, and it is no small advantage to the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco that it has to travel over an ocean to a vast continent Be- 
fore it reaches the Pacific coast. Another point is also certain, that 
a person may take about the cholera with him for some days without 
knowing that he has it, and without its being detected by any physician. 
Suddenly the germ attacks a fatal part and the victim succumbs. In 
trains and ships, where many people are packed together, the cholera in- 
fection may remain dormant for awhile. The germ is most easily diffused 
by means of water. This was first proved by Snow in regard to the 
celebrated Broadway pump, and was subsequently confirmed byRadcliffe 
and Ernest Hart, who traced its connection with the East London water 
supply. It may also be propagated by clothes and rags, and also in the 
form of dust. 

From these facts it is evident that we have no certain method of exclud- 
ing the disease by any process of quarantine. In his speech to the Ger- 
man Reichstag Professor Vichow said that, " after the experiences of 
1830, nobody could believe in the efficacy of drawing cordons and prevent- 
ing intercourse wich infected places." The so-called fumigation of pas- 
sengers and merchandise is a farc3 unworthy of an intelligent people, yet 
both these methods are already in full blast in Spain and Italy. Quaran- 
tine in theory is very plausible, but in practice it is beset with insupera- 
ble difficulties. It may be properly instituted upon the great high-roads 
of traffic, as a matter of observation principally, and for the inspection 
and detention of ships and trains arriving from infected places. In this 
respect we in San Francisco are very favorably placed, but we need proper 
conveniences for a quarantine station and for isolating any infected 
persons. 

But the most important factor in the question is one which is to be 
found at home. As Pettenkofer tersely putB it, there must be a germ and 
there must be a soil. If a germ of cholera be imported into a city, where 
the ground has been raised by dumping garbage, where the subsoil is 
reeking with organic matter from defective sewers, where the water is pol- 
luted by excrement and the air tainted with the effluvia of putrefaction, 
the germ will find a favorable soil and an epidemic will ensue. Whereas, 
if the same occurs in a city where the streets and byways are regularly 
cleansed, the sewerage good, the water pure, a few cases may, indeed, 
occur from immediate contagion, but the plague will fail to establish itself, 
[t is just the difference between burying mushroom spawn in a dung-hill 
or a sand-heap. In the one case we shall have a rich crop, in the other a 
few feeble, short-lived fruits. Let us exclude the first cases, if we can, 
but at any rate let us make sure that, if they evade our vigilance, they 
shall die out for want of the conditions necessary for propagation. 

And then as to our personal precautions. We have now a knowledge 
of the enemy, which is more than half the battle. The first and most es- 
sential precaution is to drink only pure water from a pure source. Owing 
to the prevailing dust, open reservoirs and uncovered tanks, no water in 
S:m Francisco can be considered absolutely safe. Well water should be 
regarded with even greater suspicion. Let every one, therefore, over- 
haul their cisterns and have them covered up. Let every one boil the 
water for domestic use. All sources of putrefaction — -dust-bias, drains 
and sewers— must be regarded as possible centers of infection. Unripe 
and overripe fruit, and stale vegetable and animal food, should be es- 
chewed. Rigid personal cleanliness, regular habits, moderation in the 
use of alcohol, which should be confined to meal times, the avoidance of 



excessive heat and fatigue — all aid in maintaining health and averting the 
tendency to diarrhcea and cholera. 

Nor let us forget to use our personal interest in the labors of our sani- 
tary authorities, who, unfortunately, too faithfully represent the 
apathy of the people on matters affecting the public health. Dr. Koch 
has stated that the cholera germ is destroyed by heat, and yet we have 
no means of applying heat to any article of infected clothing, except 
the destructive one of tire. Never were the sewers of this city in a 
worse condition than they are at present. Mr. Ernest Hart has proved 
that the presence of typhoid fever affords true indication of the sanitary 
condition of a city, and of this there has been a steady growth in San 
Francisco during the last few years. Do oot let us rely upon our dis- 
tance from the field of danger. Do not let us rely upon the delusion of 
quarantine; but let us turn our main attention to our individual sanitary 
surroundings, each one urging upon the sanitary authorities a more ener- 
getic attention to improvement. 

Although our hopes of finding a remedy for the attack of the cholera 
are renewed by the discovery of Dr. Koch, it must be, nevertheless, ad- 
mitted that no specific has as yet heen found. The fact is that a consti- 
tutional condition of body suited to the propagation of the germ presents 
but little hope of alleviation in the few hours which intervene between 
the attack and death. We cannot stop the action summarily, as we can 
in the case of the fermentation of a vat of beer or wine. We must 
therefore prepare our constitution for the reception of the germ so that it 
may fall upon us harmless. The most vigilant personal quarantine may 
fail to arrest the germ, but let us be assured that our safety will be in 
proportion to the perfection of our health. 

J. W. Carmany, No. 25 Kearny street, has always on hand all the 
latest novelties in Collars, Cravats, Cuffs, Scarfs, Underwear and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 

Go to the Sheltered Cove Baths, North Beach, and take a dip in the 
sea. It will preserve your health. Cars run right to the spot. 

QUICKSILVER 

FROM NEW ALHADEN MIXES. Santa Clara Comity, Cal. 

S3T Prompt Shipment. Lowest Price for Purest Uniform Quality. 



j. 



P. O. BOX 2,548. 



B. RANDOL, 
320 Sansome st 



San Francisco. 



SAVAGE & SONS 

EMPIRE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORKS 
Nos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CAIILE-ROAD 

CASTINGS, QUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON Gl I0DS. 

B^~ Estimates Free. Feb. 23. 

REMOVAL. THE "ALTA CALIFORNIA" PRINTING HOUSE, 

The Oldest Established Book and Job Printing House in the City, 
HAS REMOVED FROM ITS OLD QUARTERS, OPPOSITE, 

— TO — 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Where it has Purchased the Stock and Good-will of W. T. BAGGETT & CO., the 
" Law Journal" Printing House. 
By this consolidation and increase of material we are still better enabled to turn 
out WORK RAPIDLY, EFFICIENTLY AND CHEAPLY. 

W. A. -WOODWARD & CO. 

nrssESSMErrrwjTTcET - 

New Basil Consolidated Gravel Mining Company.— Location 
of principal place of bu a iness, San Francisco, California. Location of works. 
Placer county, California. Notice is hereby f^iven that at a meeting of the 
Directors, held on the 9th day of July, 1884, an assessment of Five (5) Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediatelj 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Monday, the 18th Day ol August, 1SS 1, 

Will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 

made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 9th day of September, 1884, to pay 

the delinquent assessment, together with cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directois F. X. SIMON, Secretary. 

IJuly 12.] 5 25 Commercial street, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 30 

Amount per Share Fift\ Cents 

Levied July 9th, 1884 

Delinquent in Office „ August 14th. 1SS4 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2d, 1884 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

^DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 619 Clay street, (Incorporated 
July 13, 1857.)— For the six months ending June 30, 1884, the Hoard of Directors 
d r clared a dividend on all deposits at the rate of four and thirty-three and one- 
third (4 33A-100) percent, per annum, free of taxes, payable on and after July 1, 1SS4. 
[June 28.] CYRUS w. CAKMANY, Cashier. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction In Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY. Howard and Firststreets, an d foot of Second at. -Ian. 12. 

L. LANSZWEERT, 

Analytical anil Consulting; Chemist, 360 Fourth Ntrret, 
Sau Francisco. July 7. 



July ^ 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



10 



MAG AT SAUCELITO. 

Dear N.I*.: Ha an' me got kind o' tl l*at vwk, in 1 

ip I-, the litv fur ■ Oyer, 'd the .ir>t panon W6 struck wu 

Mi-t- 1 'iiin' M do but we muni go otot hi Sanoellto ba im « 

i be) given for tin- beoeBt of theoharob at ■oinethiiT, s<>, m 

QotbTa' eepeciiJ frolo' on In t. iwn, i*n 1 to ma " Lata go," 

A Maud liiM k-i' ' tie, which vaa 

real lucky, 'oaoaa 'twu raviarlv crowded with f..)ks, an' altar diDoer we 

all wriit down to the Pacific xacht Club HotMfc whore tin- actio' w;*s a 

ba, l."N •>' folk-- had c in rer from the city, an 1 *>• tin- attend- 

i- rii^li t -tn.^rt. Little Hamilton wae a bnnin round re.il atten- 
tive, i Mrs. Tillinghast told ma 't he'd s. >K1 a baap o' tickets an been aw- 
ful energetic). '.M->^i all It. and G.a young loan wae "n hand, 'n I 
Whitney vu ■ matin' ayae at a pretty prl like anything. \l reckon ihaa 
kiinl o' usfti to raoh goin 1 ! on, from tin: cool way t *\w took it). Ned 
Baked ma if aha ever law euofa an ugly set • >' artOunin "■ composed the au- 
(but than, yon know, Ne*l*s awful hard t" idea.se, an 1 he never 
could bear English wimnun, unless they was way up fulks with small feet 
an' decent boots on). 

If von c>iil. 1 a seen Jimmy Bell in the openin' piece you'd a most died 

laagbiD*. Henry Gilliga real obligin' goin' round Bingin 1 . Some one 

said t they triad to get Mm. . hut she's kind o played out, or 

rather BUCg out, now as an attraction so many years hein' at it makes it 
■ sort o' old story bisneas. We didn't think much o' the witutnen 't suny, 
'n the best part o' the evenios entertainment win the farce Who's Whof 
lira. Uason made a real cute serv;iiit'.,'irl, "n the way she pushed over 
" them whiskers " made every Fellah wish 't he *d got 'em, instead o' them 
little atreaka o" hair rnnnin 1 aown from tlieir ears 'ts oalled whiskers now- 
adaya. I think it's as good as • play itself t<> see the way 't some girls go 
for ■ man. STon should a' seen one, especially, that night. Why, she 
actu'lly didn't pay one bit of attention to the actin', she was so killin' 
anxiona to catofa un to a great clumBy lookin' Britisher *t she 'd got hold of 
somehow. An' then another sight in the audience (not down on the bills) 
was ■ red-hot flirtation agoin' on between a married couple. {But la me! 
don't you go an' imagine 'twas a reg'lar husband 'n wife, "cause it was 
ue else's husband 't was a carryin 1 on with another fellah's wife). 
As ma Bald, such exhibitions is gettin' entirely too frequent here, an' folks 
is altogether too bold in it. The Judge Bays 't all the old fellahs dowu to 
tin- Pacific Club say they don't see what a man wants to get married for 
anyhow. But 1 reckon that's kiud o' sour grapes don't yon s'pose so? 

Spcakin' o* marryin* reminds me 't down to Monterey they was sayin' 

*t J was kind o' sorry 't she bad sort o' thrown off on Kyland now 't 

er girl had caught on, 'n Cell was killin' anxious to make the match, 
too. But that's always the way. When some other girl takes a fellah 
you get kind o' thinkin' 'praps you'd a better taken him yourself. Folks 
WSS a bettin' pretty heavy, down there, on the *' pair o' ponies" ('s they're 
Called), but »ue pa won't say yes till the other pa ('ts a heap richer 'n be 
is) gives his consent, which means ducats. Don't it seem 's if marryin* 

was nothin' but a regular sale? When you see a fellah like Walter , 

for instance, tyin" himself to a widow ts 's old as his own ma, just 
'cause she's got coin, yon can't blame impecunious young men for wantin' 
a soft thing as reL,';tnlslivio\ Just look at the ouce-upon-a-time steamboat 
captain ! Now he's so well-fed 't he's gettin' a reg'lar bow-window 
front on him below the belt. An' then there's P. Ashe ! Why, bless 
ymi, bis board 'n lodgin' don't cost him a cent now. Then look 't the two 
ofay brothers, the high old time they kindo 1 dropped into, tourin 1 ronn' Yar- 
rup. An' the German baron 't got his ranchatocked; 'n the Jew doctor 't 
got a bank account ; 'n the fat doctor, 't had a nice house 'n lot given to 
bis wife by her pa ; 'n 0, lots more. 

They say 't the fat boy's on the marry, 'n 't his ma's out on one side a 
prospectin' for him, 'n his pa on the other. The Judge says *t all they 
want is to get a girl 't will make dough well, 'cause they're awful fond 
o' hot rolls in that fatn'ly., though you wouldn't give them credit for any- 
thing in the (well) bread line from the looks of 'em singly or as a whole. 
The Judge says 't he was a dinin' up to their house the other evenin' an* 
be nio.>t made the fat boy weep 'cause he said he was afraid he was a 
worshiper o' the golden calf, ton. You see he's awful sensative (the fat 
boy, not the Judge) ou the subject o' cattle, ever since they had a bull 
run in the family. It breaks 'em all up like to allude to even a cow, 
'cause it has what an Englishman 'd call an '* ard " sound a followin' it. 
Don't you see ? 

Old Lnning's kind o' gone on the Vanoni, they say. I "spect they'll be 
bavin' the whole outfit up to the club some night. Ned says 't at The 
DeviVs Auction a riyht pretty girl was knocked down to one o' our well- 
known capitalists. (Now, who on top o' this earth 'd knock a girl down?) 
We went to see Aidn the other night, an' was real delighted. Old man 
Hoge's dead gone on the Indian. For "things that arc dark," an' bo forth, 
you know; that same old man is peculiar. An' they do say 't the tenor is 
bein' regularly pestered to death with pink notes from the Palace. 0, 
that reminds me. Ned says 't the back corridors o' that big hotel are get- 
ting to be a reg'lar fashionable promenade now afternoons, you can meet 
mi many o 1 your acquaintances kind o' strollin' along the passages. A 
right comical scene occurred there one day lately, but- I guess that '11 
keep till my next. So now, adoo, Mag. 



Pacific Congress Springs. — This delightful Summer resort has been 
thoroughly renovated throughout, and is now open to the public. There 
is no more pleasant place to spend a few weeks than this, and Air. W. 
H. Stedman does bis utmost to make his guests comfortable and at home. 
There is excellent trout fishing to be had in the immediate vicinity, and 
pleasant picnic parties are constantly being gotten up. The water from 
the springs has so many healthful qualities, aud is so well known here, 
that comment from us is needless. Rooms can be secured by addressing 
\V. H. Steadman, Saratoga, California. Stages connect at Los Gatos 
with S:30 A. at. and 2:30 P. JT. trains, S. P. C. E. R. Through fare, 82 50. 



We understand that Mr. Francis Cassin, one of the " old timers," 
has formed a copartnership with the well known and popular ship chand- 
ler, P. J. Daly, in the wholesale liquor business. We are satisfied that 
if they receive the patronage they merit their business should prove a suc- 
e?frs. Those who wish to purchase liquors and ship supplies at fair prices 
should try the new firm of F. Cassin & Co., 604 Battery street, S. F. 



A SPLENDID CHANCE. 
A moat Important salo, by public auction, ol Lhurn da real ciiUte i* 
announced to take place on Saturday, August 2d, on the ground, at 2 r. 
hl The estate consists ,.t i . i v located lot", ol bfty by 

hundred and Bfty feel eacb, situate on Pacific and i; ...road a ( 

a little west of Webster street, and opposite the ECohlmooj Bote), The 
splendid transportation advantages wh.oo exist now males 

as the Bnburbe of Ban PrancUco, They oaa be reached 
either by the Narrow-Gauge or the Central Pacific line. Churohi 
schools are in the Immediate vicinity, gee mains run past the pi 
and there is a plentiful supply of pure water. The estate i* well drained, 

and its surroundings are ol the most delightful nature. When it || borni 
in mind that within the past year or two Alameda has settled up with 
astonishing rapidity, and that, the stream of emigration i-* still steadily 
Howing in that direction, it must be clear that these lots will constitute a 
v.ry desirable investment either for speculative purposes or for ■ home. 
They are bound to appreciate in value at a pace far in excess of the rate 
of interest paid by savings banks. Persons who feel inclined to purchase 
will do well to bear in mind that savings banks have just declared their 
dividends, and that those who withdraw their deposits now suffer no loss. 
Mr. J. O. Eldridge, 22 Montgomery street, San Francisco, will have 
charge of the sale, under the direction of Messrs. Taggart At Dlngee, 400 
and 463 Eighth street, Oakland. 

In providing for the table, if a housekeeper wisheB to do herself 
credit, she must and should pay particular attention to the quality and 
variety of fruits and vegetables she places before those she is entertaining . 
With an assortment such as is to be found daily on the stalls of Messrs, 
Brown & Wells, 30 and 31 California Market, to select from, no difficulty 
need be experienced in satisfying every desire. Peaches, alligator peurs, 
and other luscious arbor fruit; lettuce, tomatoes, celery, cauliflower, rad- 
ishes, aud small onions with the morning dew still upon them, and any 
thing else the appetite can yearn for in the way of garden, orchard or 
vegetable productions, is to be fouud at this place. 



Photographers should not forget that if they waut to do first-class work 
they must; use the Taber Dry Plate. In addition to producing rich, clear 
negatives by the electric, or any other bright light, it enables the operator 
to v get through three times as much work as he could accomplish with the 
ola Btyle wet plate. In brief, it assures the production of accurate and 
beautiful pictures with the most astonishing celerity. Taber, the well- 
known Photographer, of No. 8 Montgomery street, is producing this 
Plate in large quantities, and sella to the trade at reasonable prices. 

To our many correspondents from Humboldt County and this City 
we wish to say that it is against our principles to recognize anonymous 
correspondence, thankful for information and suggestions. Still, we must 
have real names as a guarantee of good faith, and will then publish their 
letter. If Eureka especially will give his name we will publish his cor- 
respondence, and utilize the important facts contained. 

1. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

BTos. 57, 59 aud 61 Slliiiia street, 

Bet. First aud Second, Sun Francisco One Block from Palace Hotol. 

Also Carriages and Cutis at Pacific Chili, No. l.:o Post street; also Norl.licu„t Corner 
! Montgomery and Push streets. Vehicles of Every Description at Reduced Kates. 
TELEPHONE No. 153. July 211. 



MILLS SEMINARY. 

THE NEXT TERM OF THIS WELL-KNOWN INSTITUTION 
Opens Wednesday, July SO, is* i. 



For further information addresf 
[Jul,' "..J 



MRS. C. T. MILLS, 
Mills Seminary P. O., Alameda Co., Cal. 



Miss Traver and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 
Numhcr of pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. .May 3. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding-School for 
Young Ladies and Children, with KINDEKDAKTEN. 
Term commenced July 17, 18S4. Addresa MMB. B. ZEITSKA, 

[July 19.] Principal. 

"dancing acaoemyT" 

1328 BUSH STREET. COENEE POLK. 

Prof. O. A. Lunl respectfully announces that his new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bush street, is now open for Juvenile aud Evening Classes. Office 

Ilu ins, i.i'r Terms, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 m., and 1 to 5 p si. Pel-. 0. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CHOLLAE MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 1 4 

Amount ner share BOCenta 

Levied July -■<•>■ 188< 

Delinquent in Office August '20th, lsst 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 18th, 1881 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 
Office— Room "ft, Nevada Blojk, No. :!(!!> Montgomery street. Sao Franoiso. ' 'al. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

flice of tbe Kisiloii Iron anil Locomotive Works. -The an- 
nual meeting of the stuckl joldcrs of the RisJon Iron and Loeuiimtive Work* 
will be held ou MONDAY, August 4th, 1881, at 11a.m., at the office of the com- 
pany, southeast comer of Bcale and Howard streets, Sun Francisco, for the election 
of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the transaction of ouch other business as may 
I come before the meeting. * [July 20.] L. 11. MEAD, Secretary. 



o 



16 



SAN FKANOISOO NEWS LETTER ^ND 



July 26, 1884. 



BIZ. 



Business, in the general acceptation of the term, is exceedingly quiet, 
nor is it surprising that this should be the case during midsummer, when 
so many of our citizens are rusticating in the rnountaios or under the 
Big Trees of the forest. The financial condition of affairs at the East 
have of late been su turbulent and disastrous to many hitherto esteemed 
rich men, and to failures among old and well-established commercial 
houses, coupled with gigantic frauds, that moneyed men with us have be- 
come timid, and perhaps over-cautious at the moment. Hence it is that 
there is considerable stringency in the loan market, and those having 
money to loan are exceedingly cautious and exacting in their demands — 
requiring gilt edged securities. Farmers, however, find no difficulty in 
pmcuring all the cash they need by depositing their Wheat, Barley, etc., 
in first-class warehouses at tide-water, and where shipping conveniences 
are always at hand to take every advantage of the market. 

Harvesting is late this year, and the deliveries of Grain are as yet 
quite light. The Wheat crop is exceedingly promising, both in quantity 
and quality— now estimated at GO.000,000 bushels, against 54,000,000 
bushels iu what has heretofore been considered the banner crop year of 
the State, some fields averaging 35 or more bushels to the acre, while the 
State's average is placed from 15 to 18 bushels. 

During the past week very extensive field fires have been raging in 
Stanislaus county, in this State, many thousands of acres of standing 
wheat consumed, the loss approximating §100,000 value, and the insurance 
about §25,000. Some fields were covered by tire insurance at the rate of 
§7 per acre. The destruction by fire was complete during its path, burn- 
ing harvesters, threshers, etc., but no lives were lost, though many per 
sons were burned in their zealous endeavors to check the flames. It is 
said that some 2,000 able-bodied men were fighting the flames, but not 
witli success until they plowed distant furrows and then fired the fields of 
grain in a direction opposite to the burning grain, and thu3 the fires were 
finally checked. 

The present Spot price of No. 1 Shipping Wheat is SI 40 per ctl., 
and SI 45 for Extra Choice. Offerings at present are very meagre, and 
it is not expected that there will be auy active export movement for some 
weeks to come. Business in Futures at the Call Board is verv light — 
buyer 1884, §1 41@1 42 per ctl.; seller 1884, $1 3G@1 37i. the ship 
Pembroke Castle has cleared for Cork and orders with 34,502 ctls. New 
Wheat— value 851,750. 

The Barley Market is firm at the moment. We quote: No. 1 Brew- 
ing, SI 02A@1 05; No. 1 Feed, 82£@S5c; No. 2 Feed, New Crop, 77J@ 
80c. $ ctl. Futures— Buyer 1824. 88.\®89c; seller 1884, 8Uc; buyer 
season, 92i@93c; seller Beason, 802@8lc. 

Oats arrive freely and are quotable at SI 35@1 75 $ ctl., according 
to quality. 

Corn. -Supply liberal at SI 50@1 65 $ ctl. 

Hides.— The price of Dry has declined to 17c.; Salted, 9@10c. 

Tallow. — The demand is light at 7@8ic. for the two grades. 

Wool. — Stocks are larger but the demand is restricted to the higher 
grades of Fleece, and even then it must be very choice to command 20@ 
21c. ; other grades, 12A@15c. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Colima, 16 days from Panama and way- 
ports, brought for cargo 4,000 kegs Nails, etc., from New York, 4,600 
tons Iron, etc., from Europe, 555 pkgs. mdse. from Central America, 
3,942 bags Coffee, 50 bags Sugar, etc., from Mexico, 733 pkgs. Limes and 
other fruit. 

From Valparaiso we have the Chilian bark Ansonia, 76 days, to 
Welch & Co., with 2,547 bags Chili Walnuts, etc. 

From Fox Island we have the schr. Henrietta, from the whaling fleet, 
with 28 pkgs. Whalebone, 1,400 lbs. Ivory and 500 Foxskins. By this 
arrival we have late news from the Arctic ocean, with reports that the 
schooner Caleb Eaton was crushed in the ice on June 19tb, off Indian 
Point, in the Arctic ocean, and became a total loss. The crew were all 
saved. Captain Holman and a part of his crew arrived here on the Hen- 
rietta. She also reports the following catch up to June 26th: Thrasher, 
7 whales; Rainbow, 4 whales; Young Phcenix, 3 whales; Northern Light, 
2 whales; Napoleon, 1 whale; Hunter, 1 whale; Mars, 1 whale; Abm. 
Barker, 2 wbales; Mabel, 1 whale; J. Howland, 7 whales; Eliza, 1 whale; 
Hidalgo, 1 whale; Amethyst, clean; Belvedere, clean; Mary and Susan, 
clean; George and SusaD, clean; Seabreeze, clean; Stamboul, cleaD; 
Francis Palmer, clean; Wanderer, clean; Atlantic, clean; Bounding 
Billow, clean. 

Antwerp.— The Br. ship Menai, 158 days, to A. Carpentier, brought 
for cargo 2,000 bbls. Cement, 400 bbls. Brimstone, 18,475 cs. Window- 
glass, 1,200 pkgs. Wines, 350 cs. Mineral Water, etc. 

Freights and Charters.— There is quite a rnll in grain freights. We 
note the following engagements : Ship I. F. Chapman, 2,038 tons, 
Wheat and Mdze. to Liverpool direct, £1 15s; Chilian bark, Ansonia, 
Lumber from Burrard Inlet, B. C, to Valparaiso, terms private ; the 
ship Raphael, 1,465 tons, previously reported, has Wheat for Liverpool, 
£1 15s., Havre or Dublin, £1 16s. 3d., Antwerp, £1 17s., 6d.; bark Pearl, 
536 tons. Lumber from Humboldt to Sydney, £2 15s. per M. feet ; ship 
Chas. E. Moody, 2,001 tons, to Liverpool direct, £1 15s.; ship Frank 
Pendleton, 1,351 tons, Wheat from this port and Orchilla, from Magde- 
lena Bay to Liverpool, private. On the berth, 48,000 tons ; same date 
1884, 21.000 tons. Disengaged, 130,000 ; same date 1884, 87,000 tonB. To 
arrive within six months, 232,900 tons; same time '83, 283,700 tons; same 
time '82. 284,384 tons ; same time '81, 352,228 tons. Br. bark Harvest 
Home, 632 tons, now at Victoria, loads Salmon there for London or Liv 
erpool direct, at £2 10s. 

Coal and Iron. — As regards Coal thi3 has been an uneventful week in 
this branch of trade. Very few transactions to note. The arrivals have 
been 4,024 tons from Great Britain and Australia, and 8.570 tons from 
Coast Collieries. Prices to arrive are as follows : Australian, S7 37A@ 
7 50; Liverpool Steam, S7 12i@7 25; West Hartley, S7 50@7 75; Scotch 
Splint, S7 25@7 37i ; Cardiff; $7@7 25 ; Lehieh Lump, S12 50@12 75 ; 
Cumberland, Bulk,"$9 25@9 50; Egg, Hard, Sll 25@11 50. 



Pig Iron, — Business is very slack and unprofitable as every sale made 
shows a loss on the cost of importation. Although our imports this year 
have been unusually light, yet the quantity on hand is in excess of our re- 
quirements, and will remain so for several mouths to come, besides a 
check has been given to the importers of Scotch, by the late low figures 
made in superior grades of American by clipper from New York. Our 
consumption in 1884 will be materially diminished in comparison with 
former years, as very few quartz mills have been constructed. Prices to 
arrive are as follows : Eiilinton, S24 per ton ; Glengarnock, 825 ; Shotts 
No. 1., 826 ; Clay Lane White, S22 ; American Soft, No. 1., S25 50. 

Salmon. — We note a sale of 4,000 cs. of Sacramento River Fish at 
SI 15 t? dozen. 

Coffee, Sugar, Tea and Rice.— There is no life to the market for 
either of these staples. Prices stationary for each and all, with full stocks 
of everything but Hawaiian Rice, which is scarce, and the price advanced 
to 5 cents. 

We note the arrival of Oceanic Steimship Company's steamer Mari- 
posa, 7 days from Honolulu, with 35,000 pkgs. Sugar, 2,530 bags Rice, 
1,819 bchs. Bananas, etc. 

Those who are renovating old buildings, or constructing new ones, will 
do well tu bear in mind that Messrs. Wilson & Brother, manufacturers 
and dealers in Doors, Windows. Blinds, etc., Nos. 18, 20 and 22 Drurmn 
street, can supply everything in their line upon the most satisfactory 
terms. They have a large and completely appointed establishment, and 
their facilities for producing and handling the best quality of goods could 
scarcely be excelled. Every article sold by them can be relied upon as to 
the quality of material and construction. 

GEO. STREET, Agent News Letter, 30 CornKill, E, C, L&ndon. 

TlEBl^TolJPANY^ 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Aunaal Sale. 

8, OOO, OOO Jars. 

Finest and Cheapest 
Meat-Flavoring Stock 
for Soups, Made Dishes 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with thefac-simile of B\RON LIEBIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink across Label. The title " BARON L1EBIG " and nig photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BARON LIEB1G, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEbIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEMIG'S guarantee of genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tunic in all cases of weak digestion and dehility. 

" Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medico? 
Press, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be had of all Storekeepers. Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States {wholesale only), C. DAVID & CO., 9 Feuchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by RICHARDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 




BLAINE 



Agents wanted for authen- 
tic edition of his life. Pub- 
lished at Augusta, his 
home. Largest, handsomest, cheapest, best. 
By the renowned historian and biographer, Col. 
Con»vell, whose life of Garfield, published by 
us, outsold the twenty others by 60,000. Out- 
sells every book ever published in this world; 
many agents are selling fifty daily. Agents 
are making fortunes. All new beginners suc- 
cessful; grand chance for them; $43 50 made 
by a lady agent the first day. Terms most lib- 
eral. Particulars free. Better send 25 cents 
for postage, etc., on free outfit, now ready, 
inc hiding large prospectus book, and save 
valuab'e time. 

ALLEN & CO., Augusta, Maine. 



CONTRACT FOR FALL AND WINTER SUPPLY OF COAL! 

FOB YOUR HOUSE OB STOBE. 

Special Rates for Five Tons. Prices Furnished on Application. 

CHAS. R. ALLEN, 

120 Beale street. Telephone 308. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

MJlNTELS and GRATES, MONUMENTS and HE A OSTONES, 
In Marble and Scotch Granite, 

827 Market street bet. Fourth and Firth. 

Eg- Send for Desitms and Prices. W. H. MeCOKIIIICK. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold. Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
haB the best facilities on the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD iu their 
various forms. 

Juue 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO., 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS, 

Agents for RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS, 

635 Market Street San FranciNCO, Cal. 

PALACE HOTEL. June 24. 



.Inly 86, 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISKK. 



17 



NOTAB1LIA. 



Lawn u white Udrtvu I 



PVnlBM (tT a lady's chamber ; 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



I Apt and itoniMilmt, 

Fur niv lait» t>- lti v «.- tli<«ir ilcari; 

■ ■ ! It«0l, 

eh from liond to heel : 
Cunieba, ■ 
Buy, I u Immn ctj 

William SUAUPUU. 



A Way of Escape. /*■■■■ Mary, the new hired man, yon 

know, it :i German. Well, he saya be ia peraanaJiy acquainted with l>r. 
K eh, the areat identiet, and once did him inch a great favor that he 
ktnowi Dr, Koch will be fflad to n Vary " Well, dear, what 

" I told him t.> write t-< Dr. Koch tor some oholera germs. n 
"HorronI John, an yon oraty?*' "No, dear, but you know Conain 
8ne, in the city, la determined to c >me here with her nine children for a 
three*montbe rialt Now either we have got to take her or catch the 
oholera. Which da you prefer?" "Send for the cholera, John." 

—Philadelphia Call 

Lilllc Dcvcrcaux Blake Bays "a bachelor is a man who has lost the 
opportunity *»f making Borne woman miserable, and who, if he hail a wife, 
would not know enough (•• tell her that, when she wants to have a thor- 
ough bouse cleaning, she should obtain the assistance of J. Spauldins; & 
i the Pioneer Steam Carpet-beating and Renovating Works, Nos. 
et. Thia firm has the only machine on the Pa- 
citk- t'oa-t which heats carpets exclusively «>u the back. 

It is a curious fact that a bicycle rider, although he may only have 
seen fifteen Summers, has experienced an immense number of springs 
and falls. 

Milk in the manufacture <>f ice cream is first boiled and afterward par- 
tially congealed. In the boiling, a lacteal acid of bacterite is set free, that 
uniting with a hypo-sulphide of bnteric oxide, again sclidities as a bi- 
sulphide of Btumokake in the congealing. This, when taken into the sys- 
h ■in. produces peritonital cramps ; but it does not alter the fact that Brad- 
ley & Rulofson, Geary and Dupont streets, are the best photographers in 
the world. 

A Texas minister has left the pulpit to go to the Legislature. He 
will now order his pantaloons made with two hip-pockets, instead of only 
one. 

Some one has discovered that the high-heeled shoes worn by women 
produce Boftening of the brain. It was not generally known that the 
brain of women who wear such shoes was located so low ; but it has been 
and la universally known that delicious lunches, ice creams, patries, con- 
fections, and other delicacies can always be obtained at Swain's, No. 213 
Sutter street, where all the appointments and surroundings are recherche. 

A Massachusetts girl is the proud possessor of a pet flea. It is 
probably wicked when no man pursueth, — N. Y. Morning Journal. 

If you live In the city dont cry over spilt milk. Examine it closely 
and you may rind it is not milk, after all ; above all other things don't 
forget that the Imperishable Paint, sold by J. 11. Kelly & Co., Market 
street, comes already mixed, goes three times as far as other paints, and 
is impervious to sun or rain. 

The report that a new gas-well has been discovered and that Logan 
will take the stump comes simultaneously. 

Not a particle of Calomel or any other deleterious substance enters 
into the composition of Ayer's Cathartic Pills. On the contrary, they 
prove of special service to those who have used calomel and other mineral 
poisons as medicines, and feel their injurious effects. In such cases Ayer's 
Pills are invaluable. 

" In union there Is strength," as the creamery man said when he 
mixed a lot of lard with the butter. — Phila. Call. 

"O, shall I drink or kiss ? " asks a poet. Being a poet you will pro- 
ably kiss now and then ; but most of your time will be devoted to drink- 
ing, particularly if you can get those pure and unadulterated liquors, sold 
by Messrs. P. J. Cassin & Co., corner of Washington and Battery streets, 
to families, in retail quantities at wholesale rates. 

Dogs are better off than human beings in the hot weather. They can 
go about wearing nothing but pants and a collar. 

It Is said that a free application of 3oft soap to a fresh burn almost 
instantly removes the fire. Presidential aspirants, burning with a sense 
of the neglect they have experienced at Chicago, are recommended to take 
a bath in the mellow commodity mentioned above, and to buy one of those 
stylish election hats for sale at White's, No. 614 Commercial street. 

A button is one of those events that are always coming off. 

Boncuti is first rate for a shampoo. It cleanses the scalp thoroughly 
and leaves it in a healthy condition. While we do not warrant it to pro- 
duce a new growth of hair it has a tendency to help a new growth and 
prevent the old hair tailing off. 

Wise counsel cometh not from an empty stomach. 

A Lady writes : "I have used Ayer's Sarsaparilla in my family for 
many years, and could not keep house without it. For the relief of the 
pains consequent upon female weaknesses and irregularities, I consider it 
without an equal." 

A bad dinner is often redeemed by a good salad. 

Too much chin music makes discord in political harmony, and Dr. 
Rowas' Famous Remedy cures Sea sickness. L. R. Ellert & Co., Cali- 
oruia and Kearny streets, are agents for it on this coast. 

Mistakes are annoying, yet often prove our best teachers. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

New York men like to be braced, ladies to be em-braced. 

Best Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724$ Market St., S. F. 

A bark can heave an anchor, but a full-ringed ship can heave too. 
John Middleton— Coal— 14 Post st., and NE. cor. Geary and Mason. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Reoordnl In the Oltyand County of Sun Francisco California for 
the Week, endlnu July 21. 1884 

(A mpilt ■rmnlhr Ur,-.,, ,1. ,,i '.',, I .mwL, rcuil A<irncy,AOl California. St., S.K 
Tuesday, July 16th. 



OliANTORANI) UHANTKK. 



DKSCRirTlOK. 



I t'ICl. K 



CbM W Randall lo Eliza Montagu.- N Pint, 808:8 w Baker, w 23i]87:0, Ile- 
itis In W A Ml 

Sw Mb, 80 niv Ni.Ioimi. iiw MIX73— 100. 
vara lOfl 

9eNatonu, ISO tw Ttb, iw SSzTS loo- 
vum 267 

S Geary, 178:0 o Buchanan, o 41:8*187; 
II \V A 230 

Ne Pint, and Lvon. c 50:3xlu0. bolus: in 
Western Addition ssi ; w Baker, mo 
n Pine, n 75xio0:3, being hi Western 
Addition 681 

Sw llaightund H.-visadero, w 75x110— 
W Addition 

So Howard, 3-J8: I iw Ith, i» 20:8x155 
100-vara 1311 



Ilili Sv ,v I. a Sor ti. \l<-\ Campbell 

Mary Lydon lo Mary New 

J G Mass to Frank Lacostc 

i 'has W Uandall to G Doeckmnnn. 

J Rosenthal et a! to F H Burke 

E M Jones et al to T L Barker.. 



t 9S0 
13.000 
4,100 
11,260 

6,960 

till 
II) 



Wednesday, July 16th. 



(has E Burgansto C F Scholl.. 



Jno A Snook lo Alfred Clarke 

F Roeding ct al lo Jus J Fleming 



S Broadway, 117:ti w Leavenworth, w 
25, s 70, e 5. n 10. e 20, n Bo to begin- 
ning— 50-vara UK and 1213 

W Barllett, 130 s 25th, p 39x117:6, being 

in M B 

E Guerrero, 158:6 8 141h, p 25, e 133:6, 
ne 27:5, \v 137 to beginning, being in 

M B20 

Anna McCann to Wm McCuHough N D street, 77:0 e 15th avenue, e 25 x 

| 1II8-OL391 

Wm McCullough to W Huutington.N D street, 77:6 e 15th avenue, e 25 x 

100— OL394 

M Savage ct al to nib Sv & I.n Soc Sw Oak and Lyon, w 368:1, se 161:11, 
ne 80:2, ne 272:1, n 194:3 to beginning 
I - W A605 



$2,500 
5 



Thursday, July 17th 



Duane Ballard to J A Alberlson 

Wm Leviston to Dollie Mecartney. 

JaB R Rogers to Jules Pater 

Louisa Gcrdon to Jos Nupthaly.. 
Ellen Wright lo E H Richardson.. 
C A Warren to Jno W McDonald.. 
Wm T Taylor to J Bergez 



Sw Golden Gate avenue and Scott, w 
27:6x110 

Sw Sacramento and Scott, w 87:6x127:8 
-W A 461 

N Filbert, 114:2 w Mason, w 23:1x70- 
50-vara 450 

W Guerrero, 127 n 18th, n 25x135, being 
InM B 

N Washington, 25 e Steiner, e 22x102:8 
-W A350 

S Russell, 140 w Hyde, w 40x60— 50- 
vara 1389 

N Sutter, 197:6 w Brodorick, w 42:6x85: 
6— W A 538 



$6,750 
1,750 



Friday, July 18th. 



Hib Sav & Ln Soc to H Wegener 
WH Matthews to ElizlhD Traylor 

Joo Lyle to HF Smith 

P Anderson to E C Flagg 



E C Flagg to C A Cooper 

Chas W Beals to Jas R Rogers 

Wm M Wade to Mary Ann Meier.. 
Chas W Randall to Lanra E Perry 



S Lombard, 106:3 e Buchanan, e 55x137: 

6-W A 217 

N Broadway, 137:6 w Buchanan, w 137: 

6x275 ; sw Fulton and Fillmore, w 

137:6x68:9 

S O'Farrell, 155 w Steiner, w 22:6x92:1 

-W A3S5 

W Devieadero, 149:10 s Washington, p 

1 j inches x 120 feet, being in Western 

Addition 498 

W Devisadero, 80:7 n Clay, n 24:10x130 

-W A 498 

W Broderick, 3^:3 b Sacramento, s 14:1 

x82:2— W A 541 

Lot 21, blk 123, Central Park Homestead 

Association... 

E Lyon, 100 s California, s 50x106:3— 

W A 581 



*1,3"0 

10,000 
5,000 



Saturday, July 19th. 



Se Washington and Spruce, e 137:6x127 
8-W A 830 

S 23rd, 122:0 e Folsom, e 18:6x126, be- 
ing in M B 152 

N Jackson, 29:9 w Cherry, e 29:9, n 100: 
9, w 26, e 100:9 lo beginning, being in 
W A 851 .... 

W Texas, 300 n Yolo, n 133x200, being 
in P B261 

E Howard, 110 n loth, n 30x135, being 
in MB33 

Lots 7 to 14, block 565, being in Tide 
Lands 

W Guerrero, 31:6 s Ridley, s 50x117- 

MB25 

Same to Same |E Steiner, 77:6 c Bush, n 50x81 :3, being 

! in W A355 



Wm K Van Alen to EmiieLonigo 

Saml CrimtoJT Fleming 

M Greenwood to Ruth G Campbel 

L Haight to Jno O Jones 

Mary Murphy to Chas Kellett 

J F G Eggcrs to Jno Wieiand 

A Comte Jr to Marie P Comtc 



Monday, July 21st. 



Savs & Ln Soc to Geo Dirks.. 



J Loheed to A De Martini et al 

Wm McAllister to Wm duff 

G H Buckingham to Ellen Church 

A E Buckingham to J F Smilh ... 
F Roeding ct al to A D Segelke. . . 

L Gottig to F Roeding et al 

H Hollman to Mary J Dwyer 



Sw 13th avenue, 150 nw N street, nw 
86:8x100 ; portion blk 265, O'Neil & 
Haley tract 

S Broadway, 137:6 e Kearny, e 59:9x120 
—50 vara 14 

Ne Fillmore and Chestnut, n 30x100 - 
W A327 

Undivided one-eighlh e Franklin, 65 s 
O'Farrell, s60xl37:6-W A 81 

Undivided one-eighth Same 

Ne Clay and Mason, e 60x66, being in 
50-vara 340 

Ne Clay and Mason, e 60x120, being in 
50-vara 340 

Nw Valley and Church, n 50x1 0, be- 
ing in H A 96 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER % AND 



July 26, 1884 



THE "TIBURON." 

On the 17th Inst, the engineer's trial trip of this beautiful steamer was 
made, and briefly nuticed in these columns. 

Tl-e Tiburon is the new ferry-boat of the San Francisco and North 
Pacific Railroad, to run between San Francisco and Point Tiburon, con- 
necting with the trains to and from San Rafael and the more distant 
points on the route. 

The trial trip was made merely to test the speed of the boat and the 
quality of the engines, and proved in both instances a most thorough suc- 
cess. On that date, in company with Colonel Donahue, there was a 
gathering of marine engineers, steamboat-builders and other prominent 
men connected with the shipping interests of this port. They were all 
eager to congratulate Colonel Donahue upon his skill as a marine engi- 
neer, for in 1860 b.6 had built the Tiburon's engines in the Union Iron 
Works, at that date owned and directed by that enterprising gentleman. 

The most sanguine expectations of host and guests were more than real- 
ized, and the Colonel's hand was warmly grasped by Capt. E. Foster, 
Martin Bulger, Wm. Hawkins, Patrick Horan, James King, Capt. 
Nelson and many others, when the speed of the boat and the smooth 
working of the engines was manifest, the rate traveled being 17 miles an 
hour, with 23 revolutions a minute, and under 40 pounds of steam, with- 
out any sign of heating, or a trace of leakage in the boilers. The 
steamer is now practicaUy completed, and only a few finishing touches are 
needed from painters and varnisbers to fit her to receive and carry passen- 
gers. Her principal dimensions are as follows : Length over all, 242 feet ; 
beam over all, 66 feet; ceiling of lower deck, 10 feet; ceiling of upper 
saloon, 9£ feet; length of upper saloon, 108 feet; width of upper saloon, 
28 feet. The Tiburon is a double-ender. She has a beam engine with 
50-inch cylinder and 11 feet stroke. She has two return flue boilers 9 
feet 6 inches Bbell and 22 feet long. She has four iron water tanks in 
the hold containing 13,000 gallons of water, equal to two days supply, 
and each connected with pipes, so that they can be filled from either 
end of the boat. The paddle-wheels are 25 feet in diameter, with 
buckets 10 feet. 

She is built of Oregon pine, and diagonally strapped on the sides with 
17 tons of iron straps. Combined strength and speed have been equally 
looked to in her construction. The deck sheathing is of lj-inch cedar, 
over a bed of felt and tar. The lower deck is fitted with refreshment- 
rooms and racks for life-buoys, and other requirements of a ferryboat. 
Below, the quarters for the officers and hands are neatly and comfortably 
fitted up. The upper saloon ib reached by four broad stairways ; the steps 
rubber-covered and brass-finished. The ladies' cabin is upholstered in 
plush and finished in white China gloss. The sashes are of black walnut, 
the extreme ends having a mirror and window; through the latter a good 
view of the engine can be had. The pilot-houses are fitted with the most 
approved steering gear, bells and speaking-tubes. The carpets are heavy 
and of a subdued pattern. They were purchased in Europe during a re- 
cent visit by Colonel Donahue. The furnishing has been done by the 
California Furniture Co.; the painting by E. M. Gallagher. The cabin 
was built by Frank Williams. 

The Tiburon was modeled by Mr. P. Tiernan, the modeler of the Oak- 
land ferry-boats, and she is the finest and most symmetrical model that 
has come from the able hands of that gentleman. She has ample seating 
accommodation for the requirements of tbe passenger travel on the route. 
One of the pleasantest features in the Tiburon'a internal decorations, is 
the series of panels in the main saloon. These are scenes painted from 
nature, by Marius Dahlgreen, the artist, who spent a long time in the 
country traversed by the San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad, and 
has selected delightful landscapes throughout Sonoma and Lake counties, 
which are painted in panels 1Sx56 inches, and now decorate the port and 
starboard sides and the ends of the steamer. One of the best is a bullock 
team hauling logs from the redwoods near Guerneville. A scene full of 
life and color is a camping party, the " Oakland Merry Tramps." 

Lake county is well illustrated; the views of Uncle Sam, Clear lake and 
Highland Springs are drawn with great spirit, and the tone is life-like. 
The sunset scene on Russian river, near Guerneville, is quiet in tone and 
accurately drawn. " Lover's Leap," on the Russian river, with a passing 
stage-coach, the Geyser Canyon and Devil's Canyon, are vigorous. The 
quiet scenes are White Sulpher Springs, near Santa Rosa; Litton Springs, 
near Healdsburg, and Geyser Peak, from near Geyserville; Mark West 
and Skaggs' Springs. This group has all the charm of California skies 
and woods. 

There are also street scenes in Petaluma, Santa Rosa and Healdsburg. 
To these must be added two marines by Denny, one a view of the yacht 
Nellie in rough water off the Cliff House, the other Tiburon Point in 
Raccoon Straits. Her Captain is David Van Pelt, well known in connec- 
tion with steamship lines on this coast. The Chief Engineer is George 
Scott. The Master of Construction is Mr. J. W. Gates, and the whole 
work was superintended by Arthur Hughes, General Manager of the S. 
F. and N. P. R. R. 

The Telegraph Hill Observatory is now one of the most popular 
aud fascinating resorts in the city. Its elevated position commands a 
splendid view of the bay, the city and the surrounding country, and no 
person can fail to enjoy a visit to it. There is also dancing, music and 
other attractions. Choice refreshments are served at ordinary prices. 

In addition to the usual interesting letter-press, the Magazine of Art 
for August contains five full-page illustrations and a great number of 
smaller cuts. It is one of the best issues of this bright publication. It 
constitutes an ornament for any library or drawing-room table. 



The Sunday Excursion to Santa Cruz and Monterey, over the S. 
P. R. R., which leaves Fourth and Townsend streets at 7:50 A. M., only 
costs S3 for the round trip. 

Los Angeles complains of a scarcity of water. Topers are economizing 
by taking their whisky "straight." 



A correspondent asks: "Do blondes or brunettes have the worst 
tempers?" That depends on which you ma rj, — Phila. t Call. 

Not a favorite with cow-bows — The short horn.— N. Y. Morning Journal. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail for New York, via 
PANAMA : 
COLIMA AUGUST 1st, at 10 o'clock A. M., 

Taking freight and passengers f.ir MAZATLAN, ACAPULCO, CHAMPERICO, SAN 
JOSE DE GAUTEMALA, ACAJUTLA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line (or sale at the lowest rates ; also for Ha- 
vana and all West Indian ports. 

For Hongkong, via Yokohama: 

CITY OF PEKING JULY 2Gth, at 12 o'clock ». 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at reduced rates. 

For Honolulu, Auckland aud Sydney: 

CITY OF SYDNEY SATURDAY, AUGUST 2d, at 12 o'clock m., 

Or Immediately on arrival of the English mails. 
Ten Dollars additional is charged for Upper Cabin passage. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
[July 26.] WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 



s 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

(earners of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 

as follows : 

For Victoria, B. C, and Puget Sound Ports: 10 A. m., JULY 2d, 10th, 18th, 26th, 
and AUGUST 3d, and every eighth day thereafter. The fhst steamer of the month 
connects at Port Townsend with steamer " Idaho" for Alasica. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. and N. Co.: Every five days. 
For Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayutos, Port Harford, SanLuis Obispo, 
Gaviota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and San Diego: 
About every second day, excepting San Diego, every fifth day a. m. 
For Eureka, Areata, aud Hook ton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday i at 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday, at 3 p. M. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO.. General Agents, 
[July 12.] No. 10 Market street. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOR HlHVIlLlim . The splendid uew 3000. ton Steamships 
will leave the Company's wharf, eorner of Steuart and Harrison streets: 

MARIPOSA FRIDAY, AUGUST 1st 

ALAMEDA FRIDAY, AUGUST 16th 

AT 3 P. M. 
EXCURSION TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
For further particulars apply to 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents, 
[July 19.] 327 Market St., eorner Fremont. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

For Japan and Cblua.— Leave Wnarf Corner First aud 
BRANNAN STREETS at 12 o'clock noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONG- 
KONG, connecting at Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai: 

OCEANIC CAPT. METCALFE AUGUST 7th 

ARABIC CAPT. PEARNE AUGUST 19th 

SAN PABLO CAPT. REED 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama aud Return at Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at G. P. R. R. Co. 'a 
General Office, Room 74, cor. Fourth and Townsend sts. 
For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
LELAND STANFORD, President. July 2(1. 

FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

Tbe Oregon Railway and Navigation Company and Pacific 
Coact Steamship Company will dispatch from Spear-street Wharf, for the 
above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA and OREGON. 

Sailing Days: 
JULY 3-8-13-18-23-28, AUGUST 2, and every following Five 

Days, at 10 o'clock a. m.. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, British 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
[July 5.] No. 10 Market street San Francisco. 

SKIN DISEASES CURED IN A FEW DAYS.-SULPHOLINE LOTION Re- 
moves Eruptions, Pimples, Redness, Blotches, Scurf, in a few days. Is highly 
successful in Eczema, Psoriasis, Prurigo, Tetter, etc. It totally destroys many deep- 
seated, inveterate skin affections. Most agreeable to use. In Great Britain SUL- 
PHOL1NE is the one Skin Remedy. 

SULPHOLINE LOTION.-ANY ONE, HOWEVER DEEPLY AND APPAR- 
ently hopelessly afflicted with Skin Disease, should apply SULPHOLINE as 
quickly as possible. In two or three duys the effect will become evident in a dimin- 
ished appearanoe of the malady, a growing tendency to fade away, and complete 
obliteration of the eruption. Sold everywhere by chemists, etc. 

SULPHOLINE LOTION.— AS A REMEDY FOR PIMPLES, BLOTCHES, RED- 
uess, Rashes, Blemishes, Spots, Roughness, Discoloration, Eczema, Rosea, Pi- 
tyriasis, Prickly Heat, Salt Rheum, Scurf and General Irritability of the Skin, SUL- 
PHOLINE acts like a marvel. None of these eruptions can withstand it. The 
LOTION attacks them all by some depurative action, and brings the skin out clear 
and healthy. SULPHOLINE is beautifully fragrant. Made only by JOHN PEPPER 
& CO., London, England. 

Sold by WAKELEE & CO., Montgomery and Bush streets, 
San Francisco. 

LIVER PILLS. -DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS. THE GREAT ENGLISH MED- 
icine. Established 70 years. 

LIVER PILLS.— DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS, CONTAINING DANDELION 
and Quinine, without Mercury, are far above all others as the surest, mildest 
and best means of removing obstructions and irregularities of the Liver and Stom- 
ach, Headache, Biliousness, Shoulder Pains, Indigestion, Consti] at : on, Flatulence, 
Torpidity, so insuring perfect health. DR. KING'S PILLS arc sold everywhere. 
Kept by WAKELEE & CO., San Francisco. 



Job 26, L884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL 
Tho Cost of a Load Pencil. " W h it to mike » lead pon 

qotrled » rtportar »>t tin- Now York Ami " Fin»t let ma tell you 
bow in makfl .1 laid pracdl," »i*iil tho m»nafaatanr> " See thin 6nt buok 

powder 1 That's frapbtte. It ooati twenty tive otnta :i 1 Dd Thin 

white rabtteDOt It 1 JiTiniiu clay. It comes acroca the ocean a* ballast in 
nailing vessels, and all it ootti lit it freight, We mix this ,-];iy ud tliis 
powder together end grind them in a mill, allowing molttort to he added 
during the prootea, until the two are thoroughly assimilated and are re- 
dooea to a paste about the consistency of putty. This paste we press into 
ten one of whirl) is the si/e of a, pencil lead, except in length. 
vr<- four leads in one of these. After they are pressed we cut them 
int<> tin- proper length, and bake them in an oven kept at very high heat. 
There we have the leu made, Ita hardnea is regulated by the greater or 
lens amount of clay we mix with the graphite — the more clay we put in 
the harder the lead The cedar we use oomee principally from the swamps 
t I 'l.-rida, and is obtained entirety from the fallen trees that lie there. 
The wood is delivered to us in blocks sawed to pencil lengths, some thick, 
to receive the lead, and others thin, for the piece that is glued over tho 
tend The blocks are sawed for four pencils each. They are grooved by 
:i taw. the groove being the place where the lead is to lie. The leads are 
kept iu hot glue, and are placed in the grooves as the blocks are ready. 
When that is done, the thin block is glued fast to the thick one. When 
dry the blocks are run through a machine that cuts the pencils apart. 
Then they are run through a machine that shapes and burnishes them, 

I and they are ready to be tied in bunches, boxed and put out. The differ- 
ent grades in value are made by finer manipulation of the graphite. Here 

I is a pencil that is about the average quality used in every day business. 
It costs a little more than one quarter of a cent to get it ready for mark- 
et. We sell it to dealers at one hundred per cent profit, and the dealer 
makes much more than that. Of this grade an operator and the machinery 

1 will easily make 2,500 a day. 

Koumiss.— Koumiss has become a very common article of diet with 

I dyspeptics, and according to the Chicago Review it may be made at home 

! at a cost of about 15 cents per quart. The following directions are given 
for its manufacture: Fill a quart champagne bottle up to the neck with 
pure milk ; add two tableapoonfuls of white sugar, after dissolving the 
same in a little water over a hot fire ; add also a quarter of a two cent 
oake of compressed yeast. Then tie the cork on the bottle securely, and 
shake the mixture well ; place it in a room of the temperature of 50 degs. 
to 95 degs. Fahrenheit for six hours, and finally in the ice box over night. 
Drink in such quantities as the stomach may require. It will be well to 
observe several important injunctions in preparing the koumiss, and they 
are; To be sure that the milk is pure ; that the bottle is sound ; that the 
yeast is fresh ; to open the mixture in the morning with great care, on &c- 
c >unt of its effervescent properties ; not to drink it at all if there is any 
curdle or thickening part resembling cheese, as this indicates that the fer- 
mentation has been prolonged beyond the proper time. Make it as you 
need to use it. The virtue of koumiss is that it refreshes and stimulates, 
with no after reaction from its effects. It is often almost impossible to 
obtain good fresh koumiss, especially away from large towns. The above 
makes it possible for any physician to prescribe it. 

Gelatine Dynamite.— Explosive gelatine, or gelatine dynamite, is the 
result of the solution of from 7 to 8 per cent of collodion cotton in nitro- 
glycerine. When, however, less than quantity is taken, the substance 
becomes less firm, and if from 2 to 3 per cent only is used, the product is 
simply a thickened oil, or gelatinized nitro-glycerine. This genatinized 
nitro-glycerine has the great advantage of being capable of being absorb- 
ed and retained completely by a much smaller quantity of other sub- 
stances than nitroglycerine, and it is possible, therefore, to prepare sta- 
ble mixtures of an explosive base and gelatinized nitro-glycerine. The 
Nohels now prepare three grades of these new extra dynamites: No. I. 
consisting of 64.5 per cent of gelatinized nitroglycerine, and 35.5 per 
cent of an absorbent containing 75 per cent of potash saltpeter, 24 per 
cent of wood shavings, and 1 per cent of soda ; No. II. being composed 
of 45 per cent of gelatinized nitro-glycerine and 55 per cent of above ab- 
sorbent ; and No. III. being a mixture of 14 per cent of ordinary nitro- 
glycerine and 86 per cent of an absorbent containing 70 per cent of soda 
saltpeter, 15 per cent of Bulphur, 14 per cent of charcoal, and 1 per cent 
of soda. With a charge of 20 grammes the volume of the cavity in the 
lead cylinders had expanded, using No. I., from 15 cubic centimeters to 
1,229 cubic centimeters, No. II. to 886, and No. III. to 466 c. c. 

— Scientific American. 
The Champagne Vintage. — We have heard that the following are 
about the quantities of the 1883 champagnes bottled this Spring by the 
leading houses : Moet and Chandon, 4,500,000 ; G. H. Mumm and Co., 
3,000,000; Perrier Jouet and Co., 2,000,000; Pommery, 2.000,000; 
Heidseick, 1,500,000 ; Roederer, 1,000,000 ; and Clicquot, 600,000.— Wine 
Trade Review. __ 

Wonderlich & Bamber, Proprietors of the Newport Baths, Alameda, 
offer a gold medal to the best boy and girl swimmer, to be competed for 
Sunday, July 27, 1884, at 2 o'clock p. m. There will be an exhibition of 
some of the youngest swimmers ou the coast — pupils of Prof. Charles 
Weightman, the Man-fish. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately af- 
ter returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be pre- 
vented. James G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 

If you want anything in the way of Japanese Goods, go to Marsh & 
Co.'s, No. 625 Market street. Twelve years' residence in Japan has given 
them unusual facilities. 

See advertisement oa cover to know where to get the genuine Krug 
Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other coun- 
terfeits. 

Rural Excursions. — To avoid the evil effect of Poiaan-oak and to re- 
lieve Sunburn, procure Camelline for the complexion. 

Boncuti should be in every house, and when once thoroughly tested 
will never be discarded. 



150 150 150 

THE STANDARD SHIRT, 



Mi1r1.11 





N.B. 
150 

<IE LINEN. 1 



FINE 

Is the VERY BEST Quality WHITE SHIRT for 

SI-BO. 

Give this Shirt a trial, recommend it to your friends, and promote Homo Manu- 
facture by asking for 



150 



150 



150 



KINCSFORD'S OSWECO STARCH 

IS THE 

STRONGEST, PUREST AND BEST, 

AND IS RKCOOK1Z£D AS 

THE STANDAED ALL 0VEB THE W0ELD. 



JOB IlfVAXIDS, 
KINGSFORD'S CORN STARCH 
IS HIQHL1T SECOMXENDED FOB ITS PVRITT AND 
DELICACY. Sept. 30. 

MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersigned, having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have now in Btore: 

Sail Dnok, all Numbers ; 

Hydraulic, all Numbers ; 
Draper and Wagon Duck, 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a complete assortment of All Qualitie, 
281-Inch DUCK, from 7 oza. to 15 ozs. inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

THE /ETNA SPRINGS ARE NOW OPEN. 

To the highly curative properties of these waters and the charms of the place is 
added an Elegant and Uapac oua SWIMMING-BATH. These waters Purify the 
Blood, Refresh, Renew and Restore the Whole System. They Cure Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, Dyspepsia, Erysipelas, Kidney and Liver Diseases, Chronic Diarrhma, Par- 
alysis and Pulmonary Complaints, in the early stages. They afford magical relief in 
cases of Nervousness, Sleeplessness and General Debility. 

For Pamphlet, containing Analysis and Cures, address, 

WM. BTJRNELL. Superintendent, 
Or WM. H. LIDELIi, Proprietor, 
Udell Postoffice, Napa County, Cal. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STREET, COR. HALLECK, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Tliis hotel is in the very center of the businees portion of the city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, SI, SI 25 and SI 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 25 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, ;;ood for any meals, $5. Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

ART GLASS WORKS, 

Now. 1211, 1213 and 1315 Howard St., bet. Eighth and Ninlh. 



JOHN MALLON- 



May 3. 



ALAMEDA. 

Ht£T Purchasers can secure some BARGAINS IN IMPROVED 
and UNIMPROVED PROPERTY, by applying to 

J. M. REYNOLDS, Real Estate Agent, 

[April 5.] Park st., near N. G. R. R , Alameda, Cal. 

AT) "D T *7 "p Send six cents for postage, and receive free, a costly box 
V J\l £_^ J__ ,» of goods which will help all, of either Bex. to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute'y 
sore. At once address TEUE & 00.. Augusta, Maine. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LESTER. 



July 26, 1884 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The demonstration in favor of the Franchise bill, which took place 
in London <>n last Monday, was unquestionably one of the most imposing 
d.splays of popular feeling which have taken place in England for many 
long years. Over one hundred thousand men, taken from those ranks in 
society which constitute the bone and sinew of any country, marched in 
procession in a dignified and decorous manner, in order to express the dis- 
approval of the action of the House of Lords in practically rejecting a 
measure which proposed to place the elective franchise in the hands of 
some two millions of people. A great yet simple demonstration of this 
kind is an omen which no wise statesman can afford to disregard, because 
it shows that the mass of the people are thoroughly in earnest in their 
desire for this measure. It must be borne in mind, in this connection, 
that the English people are not addicted to demonstrations of this kind, 
and the numerical strength of the procession can only be taken as an in- 
dication of the volume and direction of public opinion. For every one 
man who marched in line there were, probably, ten within easy reach who 
were thoroughly and enthusiastically in sympathy with the object of the 
demonstration. Any movement which can turn out one hundred thou- 
sand people in procession in London, rests very near the heart of tho 
nation. 

The effect of this demonstration will not, of course, be immediately ob- 
servable, and the political situation is likely to remain uochanged for the 
time being. It is understood that, the negotiations for a compromise 
having failed, the present programme of the Ministry is to adjourn Par- 
liament for a short time, and to call an early Autumn session, at which 
the Franchise Bill will be again passed through the Commons, and sent 
up to the Lords. Should it be a second time rejected, a dissolution of 
Parliament will follow. If the Ministry returns triumphant from that 
appeal to the country, the disputed measure will be a third time passed 
by the popular assembly and sent to the Upper Chamber. Should the 
matter reach this stage, the rejection or mutilation of the Bill by the 
Lords will undoubtedly be followed by the most radical changes in the 
Parliamentary system of the United Kingdom. It is hardly probable 
that the Peers will push the conflict to this self-destructive limit, 

Within the past few weeks the political outlook in British affairs has 
undergone a decided change in favor of Gladstone's Cabinet, and the 
present indications are that the popular enthusiasm excited by the Fran- 
chise Bill will suffice to tide them over their difficulties. Gladstone's 
policy in regard to Egyptian affairs, which was the Government's weak 
spot, does not seem to occupy the public mind as much as it did. The 
Tory opposition to the Franchise Bill has driven it into the background, 
and besides affairs in the Soudan, for the time being, at least, present a 
much healthier appearance. A more extended conflict with the House of 
Lords, over the Franchise Bill, is, unless the signs of the times are de- 
ceptive, likely to result in giving the Government a new lease of power 
and a practical invitation to continue placing liberal principles, embodied 
in reform measures, upon the Statute books. 

The cholera epidemic in France does not seem to be spreading to any 
alarming extent, but it is sweeping down its victims with a steadiness and 
persistency which is appalling, and it shows no symptoms of decreasing. 
In Paris it is reported to be increasing, and, again, its very existence iB, 
officially, denied. For manifest reasons the first statement is worthy of 
the most credence. It is, also, rumored that the plague has made its ap- 
pearance at Khars and other stations in the Caucasus, Russia. There is 
still, unfortunately, a broad chance that Dr. Koch's prediction may be 
verified, and that the disease may spread all over Europe. 

News from the Soudan continues to be as unreliable as ever. That emi- 
nent warrior, the Mudir of Dongola, has again distinguished himself by 
defeating 5,000 rebels. The Mudir of Dongola, by the way, is a sort of 
Protean actor. One day he is wiping out of existence large armies of 
rebels, the next day he is a traitor, and the day after he and his town 
have been captured by the Mahdi, after a gallant defense — at least, this 
is what the telegraph says. Ordinary persons, however, are beginning to 
feel as though it would take a big stack of affidavits to make them be- 
lieve that there is any such place as Dongola, or any such person as the 
Mudir thereof. 

The trouble between France and China has reached a stage where it is 
difficult to place it. The time allowed by the French ultimatum, and the 
extension thereof, has long since passed, yet no active hostilities have 
broken out, nor have diplomatic relations apparently been broken off. 
The only thing which has occurred, so far, ia the seizure of Foo Choo by 
the French fleet Further developments may be looked for every moment, 
and a grand back-down on the part of the Chinese need surprise no one. 

THE SORROWS OF GENIUS. 

Homer was a beggar. Spencer died in want. Cervantes died of hun- 
ger. Terrance, the dramatist, was a slave. Dryden lived in poverty and 
died miserably. Sir Walter Rileigh died upon the scaffold. Butler lived 
a life of penury, and died in distress. Plautus, the Roman comic poet, 
turned a mill. Paul Borghe'se had 14 trades, and yet starved with all of 
them. Tasso, the Italian poet, was often in want of a meal. Steele, the 
humorist, lived in perfect warfare with bailiffs. Otway, the author of 
many fine plays, died prematurely and from hunger. Edgar A. Poe lived 
a life of continual poverty, and died through accident caused by drink. 
Chatterton, the child of genius, destroyed himself at eighteen. Bentivig- 
lio was refused admission into a hospital he himself had erected. Savage 
died in a prison, where he had been confined for debt. Collins died from 
mental derangement caused from neglect. Goldsmith's "Vicar of Wake- 
field " was sold for a trifle to save him from the grip of the law. Fielding 
lies in a graveyard in Lisbon, without a stone to mark the spot. Dan. 
Emmett gotSo for writing the words and music of "Dixie." Milton sold 
his copyright of " Paradise Lost" for $75, in three payments, and finished 
his life in obscurity. John Howard Payne got §100 for his "Home, 
Sweet Home." Nat Bannister, an actor and play- writer, got §25 for his 
play of Putnam. The managers made fortunes with it. Nat died in a 
garret— in fact, starved to death. 



LO, THE POOR SAILOR. 
The sailor has at last found an efficient friend in the shape of the 
Dingley Shipping Law. This is probably one of the most humanitarian 
and disinterested laws to be found on the statute-book of Congress. The 
sailor's life on shore is a curious and pitiful sort of existence. He is, to a 
great extent, cut off by his training and by the peculiarities of his occu- 
pation from associating familiarly with landsmen in the usual modes of 
gratifying their tastes. His lack of friends and kindred throws him into 
the company of traitorous and designing parasites. Above all, his wage- 
less' condition brings him under the power of those who supply him with 
board and lodging and other necessaries. He is subjected, in liis helpless- 
ness, toall sorts of extortions and exactions, from men who rival slave- 
drivers in their fiendish ruthlessriess. To remedy the troubles into which 
he is so deeply plunged some means must be found to keep him free from 
the clutches of his evil genii, the land-sharks and boarding-house keep- 
ers. The Dingley Shipping Bill, among other beneficial provisions, for- 
bids any ship-captain of any nationality to pay advance wages to any sea- 
man before leaving the port. Naturally, under the operation of such a 
law, there will be no money to the boarding-house keepers in getting a 
pecuniary hold on the sailor, for there will be no prospect of recovering 
any money from their victims. Their extortions rested upon the certain- 
ty of securing, out of future advance wages, whatever their greed might 
claim ; and having a lieu on the men's clothes and personal possessions, 
they would refuse to let them ship until their demands were satisfied. 
The wholesome curtailment of their expectations will now reduce their 
dealings with the sailors to the limits of honest and legitimate business. 
Every one who takes an interest in the welfare of Jack must rejoice at 
the stoppage of the inhuman traffic. Adjustment to the new conditions 
will come gradually, but when it does come fully the sailor will find him- 
self a new man. For the present the sailors themselves are between two 
fires. The boarding-house keepers refuse to release them without pay- 
ment, while the ship-captains are forbidden to advance the necessary 
wages. But as soon as the new state of affairs is recognized and accepted 
we shall have the satisfaction of knowing that one more source of demor- 
alization has been removed from the community. Henceforth the sailor's 
soul is his own. 

THE NEW ORLEANS FAIR. 
The present effort to organize and forward to the New Orleans 
World's Fair an exhibit of the resources and products of this State which 
shall be worthy alike of our energy and opportunities, is one which de- 
serves an enthusiastic and liberal support. The people of the State, too, 
are to be congratulated on the fact that the management of this affair has 
been placed in the hands of a Commissioner (Col. A. Andrews) who will 
not allow the grass to grow under his feet, or imagine that by merely ac- 
cepting the position he has done all that is to be expected of him. Col. 
Andrews is a different sort of man from that. He is the incarnation of 
energy, enterprise and shrewdness, and whatever he takes in hand is sure 
to be well done. He has entered upon the execution of the duties of his 
commissionership with his usual vim, and in promoting the movement he 
is spending his own money and his time with a liberality which is only 
equaled by the success which his well-directed efforts is meeting. He has 
obtained representative men, particularly bankers, throughout the 
various counties of the Commonwealth to act as his agents, and he has 
scattered abroad the fullest information in regard to what should be done 
and how to do it. As a result, it is now safe to affirm that California will 
be represented at this great exhibition by a display which will convey an 
adequate idea of the variety and value of her resources and industries. 
Bearing in toind the fact that the New Orleans Fair will attract the at- 
tention and attendance of representative men from all over the universe; 
that, in fact, it will be one of the greatest gatherings which ever assem- 
bled in the United States, the amount of positive gcod which this exhibit 
will do us must be very great, and the people should congratulate them- 
selves that a live man like Col. Andrews was asked to accept the purely 
honorary position of Commissioner. In conclusion, we desire to add that, 
while the success of California's exhibit is now assured, there is no reason 
why it should not be made still more successful, and every public-spirited 
citizen should ascertain if he cannot do something toward achieving that 
result. 

MUTINY AT DARTMOOR. 
A Plymouth correspondent telegraphs a remarkable story in regard 
to Dartmoor Convict Prison. A few days ago a party of about twenty- 
five convicts were at work in a bog some distance from the prison. One 
of the convicts suddenly picked up some large stones and threw them at 
the warden in charge, felling him to the ground insensible. The loaded 
rifle which he carried fell from his hands, and the convicts then made a 
rush toward him. A convict named Stevens, who had only recently ar- 
rived at Princetown, seeing the danger to which the wardens were exposed, 
outstripped the other convicts, and reaching the fallen warden first picked 
up the rifle and pouch of ammunition. Standing over the prostrate 
warder Stevens fired at his advancing comrades, disabling five or six of 
them by shooting them in the legs. The ammunition becoming exhaust- 
ed the convict seized the rifle by the barrel and knocked over about an 
equal number. As Stevens stands over six feet in hight, and is powerful 
in proportion, he was able to deal terrible blows with the clubbed weapon. 
By this time the wardens who were posted at commanding points all around 
the farm were closing in, and Stevens, on their arrival, threw down the 
rifle and explained what had occurred. Carts were obtained to convey 
the wounded convicts to the prison infirmary, and the remainder were 
handcuffed and escorted to the prison. At the latter part of the week 
all the convicts were paraded within the prison walls, and Stevens was 
called up by the Governor and informed that in recognition of his cour- 
ageous conduct the Home Secretary had ordered that he should be released 
and rewarded. Stevens was so overcome by the intelligence that he sob- 
bed like a child, and had to be assisted back to his cell, from which he 
will shortly emerge a free man. His feelings can be understood when it 
is mentioned that the sentence he was undergoing was penal servitude for 
life. He has served only 12 months. — Summary. 



We hear that the "sweet girl graduates" at Vassar this year had to 
work so hard for their graduation that they all became Vassar-lean. This 
will surely keep the chaps off. — Yonkers Statesman. 








(£alif fimiWXbbtxtx sex. 




Vol. 35. 



SAN FEANOISOO, SATDEDAY, AUG. 2, 1884. 



No. 4. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE CO., FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. 

■VOPFIOB at Um AEROPLANK i'iiMPANY fur Hivlgatlur Ul« Air, 809 
»>fncu hour, from 1 to 2 p. M. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Wort with District Attorney EUIborn 10 

"A Valuable California Invention "... 7 

"Bit" 19 

Comments mi Pbnjgn Affair* 80 

I Cradle, Altar and Tom!) 16 

-Jo 

Bugllan Bj Donyma 4 

Fashion's Y\>kv 2 

Horrible!. B 

Jewish Qsnhu lor Musk-. iss 

Let is Bdnoata i" 

SUg/s Letter 14 

Male Beauties 5 

Matters (or llnabands to Think of and 

Perform 2 

M..ral Reading :i 

bUokwnu l* 

KoUbilU IT 



Paris and Fashion 10 

Passing Remarks 9 

Pleasure's Wand. 6 

Price* oJ Leading 8tocks, etc I 

Real Estate Transactions IT 

Real Public Benefactors 10 

Sin ii |>ii_' Fables. l. r > 

Scientific and Useful 8 

Society 8 

Some New Geography lf> 

Sporting 7 

Stocks l 

Sunbeams 10 

The Coming Crusade 2 

i'ii. Sul ml tern's Guard 4 

To the Brltieh Investor Again 10 

Town Crier 11 

We Tune Our Instrument 10 



STOCKS. 

" Hundreds of deluded Individuals/ 1 who purchased stocks for 
the past year or so, under the advice of the evening organ of "wreckers " 
and "pirates," have at last had an opportunity to get back some of the 
money advanced by them for assessments. None of the mines, however, 
sold high enough to permit a return of the principal invested. This op- 
portunity to recover even a moiety of the loss was displeasing to the 
"sage authority," and he vigorously opposed the upward movement from 
the first, on the ground that there was nu merit in the mines to back it. 

In our issue of last week we stated that there never was sufficient merit 
in any of the Comstock mines to justify the extravagant prices at which 
they have been quoted, even when the "authority " was suggesting fu- 
ture " bonanzas ; " and intimated that the late rise was simply a manipu- 
lators deal, which would prove advantageous to those wise enough to get 
out. This disinterested (?) scribe is now bewailing the losses of " poor, de- 
luded people," apparently ignoring the joy that some " wreckers " ex- 
perience in being able to Jill at a profit. We do not mean to insinuate 
anything — of course not. 

If there is anything in street rumors, the morning papers made a mis- 
take in the identity of the leading manipulator of the deal ; in other 
words, they got the wrong pig by the ear. It seems rather severe to ac- 
cuse a victim of the deal with making money in a surreptitious manner. 
Where are the gentleman's friends and adherents that they do not defend 
him ? Perhaps, however, it would not be policy at present to take sides. 
We overlooked that probability. 

The center of interest for some time to come will be Mexican. Work 
in the lower levels of other North End mines will be virtually closed down 
until the result of the present explorations in this mine is determined. 
The formation encountered so far is flattering, and gives every reason to 
hope that an ore body of some importance may yet be uncovered. This 
stock will undoubtedly enhance in value within the next sixty days. 

There is nothing new to report from Hale & Norcross in relation to 
the new find. Opinions at the front are very much divided as to its im- 
portance, and those expressed in the daily papers of this city are so obvi- 
ously biased in the interests of a certain clique that they can not be de- 
pended on. Our private information is that there is better ore on the 
lower than they have on the upper levels. This is from a source which 
never yet failed us, and it will moBt likely turn out correct in the long 
run. There is no doubt, however, that the prospect to-day is 100 per 
cent, better than that encountered last year, when the paper, which is 
now working so Btrenuously to depreciate the value of the mine, was try- 
ing to prove that the only point on the lode at which a bonanza might be 
expected was on the 2,800-foot level of Norcross. 

The Alta mine is still a mystery to outside dealers. Transactions in the 
stock have been limited and the price has not varied more than two or 
three bits during the week. It is difficult to understand the reason why 
the manipulators of the stock seek to depress it so persistently. Perhaps 
it is against their business principles to organize a deal, unless there is 
merit in the mine to back it. Knowing that honesty has always been 
considered by these gentlemen to be the best policy, we suggest that the 
price of this mine be lowered to its intrinsic value — 25 cents per share. 
This can be easily effected by tapping one of the reservoirs for which this 
mine is famed. The gambling taste of the public is an outrage against 
good morals and should be discouraged. 

Justice still holds her own at 30 cents. Navajo is increasing her ship- 
ments. Bullion to the amount of 810,500 shipped last week. This is the 
mine termed " played out" by some of the Pine street buzzards. Grand 
Prize is being washed at 50 cents. We again warn investors against this 
cat. It and its sister, Argenta, are two of the most infamous frauds on 
the Board, and to touch them means loss of money every time. 



London, Aug. 1.— Consols, 100 5-16d. 



JOLD KAKS-'.'jn fine par. Kkkineh Silvek- Hksi:. (;/ cent, dis- 
* count. Mexican Dollars, 10(3,10$ per cent. disc. 

•" Exchange on New York, 20c; on London Bankers, 4!Ud. Paris 
Bight, 5-12A@5-10 francs per dollar. Telegrams on New York, 

F Price of Money here, 7@ 10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 
open market, 1@1J per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
6 per cent, per year, on Call. Demand gnml. 

W Latest price of Sterling in New York, 483@485. 

PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND 00V. BONDS. 

San Francisco, Aug. 1, 1884. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


BONDS. 








20 


30 


Cal. State Bonds, 0's,'57 


— 


— 


BAKU. 






S. F. Citv & Co. B'ds. 0s,'5s 


— 


— 


Bank of California (ex div). 


155 


100 


S. F. Citv & Co. B'ds, 7s ... 


— 


— 


Pacific Bank (ex <liv) 


185 


— 




— 


— 


First National (ex divj 


115 


120 




— 


— 


RAILROADS. 








- 


- 


C. P. P.. R. Stock 


40 

no 


42 




a. P. R. It. Uonds 


111 














57} 
92} 


01 




— 





N. B. and Mission R. R 


90" 


Los Angeles County Bonds. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 
Virg'a & Truekee R. R. Bds. 


= 






95 
96 

20 


99 






Central K. R. Co 




Nevada Co. N. O. R. K. Bds 


— 


— 




Nom. 


Nom. 




— 


— 


Clay Street Hill R. R 


Nom. 


Nom. 


Or.R.&N.Co.Bonds,6s(exe) 


108 


108 


S. F. Gaslight Uo 


5;i 


M 


S. P.R. R. Bonds (ex 0) ... 
U. 8. is (ex cou) 


99} 
ISO) 


100 
ISO) 


Oakland Gasiitfht Co 

Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex div) 


27 
57 


29J 
69 


N.Paclflc R. R, Bonds 


102J 


103} 


Califor'a Powder Co 


— 


. 






120 


Giant Powder Co 


60 

35 


80 




Atlantic Giant Powder. . . . 


45 




142 


147 


Gold and Stock Telet^h Co. 


— 


Ui 




120 


125 


S.V.W.W.Co'sSlock 


878 
110} 


88 




85 


92 


S.V.W.W.Co'8 Bonds 

Pacific CoastS.S.Co's Stock 


noj 


JII8CRLLANR017S. 




95 


115 




141 


150 




38 


42 
60 




80 












12 


35 
13 


1NHURANCB COMPA.N1KS. 


114 









Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 


4 


5 


Fireman's Fund (ex div) . . 


-_ 


180 


California Iron and Steel Co. 


H 


10 




— 


us 



There is a decidedly better inquiry for these securities, with more busi- 
ness doing. A. Baird, No. 411 Montgomery street. 

Mr. Wilfred B. Chapman, the Consular Agent of the Belgian Gov- 
ernment at this port, announces that a Universal Exposition is to be 
opened at Antwerp on May 2d, 1885. Merchants, manufacturers and 
others on this coast who desire to be informed in detail as to the con- 
ditions under which exhibits will be received, can get the fullest informa- 
tion at Mr. Chapman's office; also blank forms of application for admis- 
sion. This will, unquestionably, be a very important exhibition, and our 
business men, manufacturers, etc., should see to it that California's re- 
sources are properly represented. Every loaf of bread cast upon the wa- 
ters in this way brings five back in due season. Applications for space 
must be forwarded to Antwerp by the 1st of September next, so there is 
no time to be lost. 

Latest Charters.— Ship Servia, 1,867 tons. Wheat to Liverpool direct, 
£1 15s. ; Havre or Antwerp, £1 17s. 6d.; orders for one of the above ports 
2s. 6d. less. Ship Loretto Fish, 1,994 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre 
or Antwerp, £1 18s. 9d. British ship Tilkurst (iron), 1,527 tons, Wheat 
to Cork, U. K., £2 53. ; long lay days. Bark Navesink, 724 tons, now at 
Portland ; Lumber thence to Montevideo. 



Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 1, 
1884.— U. S. Bonds— 3s, 100; 4s, 120|; 4is, 112g. Sterling Exchange, 
482.L@4S4*. Western Union, 62^. Wool— Spring, fine, 15@24 ; Burry, 
10(aa4 ; fulled, 28@35 ; Fall Clips, 12@15 ; Burry, 10@14. London, 
Aug. 1.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 7s. 8d.@7s. lid. Dull. 

Associated Press Dispatch. July 31st.— The Star, Kelly's organ, is 
silent on the proceedings, it says of the Independent movement : It is 
far less extensive this year than the Republican revolt of 1872. It is a 
movement conducted entirely by officers with no privates. 

The recently -adopted time schedule on the Central Pacific Kail- 
road will be put in operation on the 5th inst., and the first mail from 
Ogden will arrive in San Francisco on the 6tb, at 11:10 A. m. 

The Bank of British North America has removed to 312 Pine 
street, San Francisco, the new quarters having been specially arranged for 
them, with large steel vaults and other conveniences. 

Registered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, California, as Second-Class Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER »AND 



Aug. 2, 1884. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



How pleasant it is to be appreciated — to feel that one's work is not 
in vain. Thus did I feel yesterday when a particular friend of mine 
dropped in and told me how she had made a scarf out of a piece of old 
l»ce, according to a design of mine set forth some weeks ago. Apropos of my 
friend, she truly is a model of elegance. I have seen that woman in an old 
morning wrapper, in which any other would have looked like an old fish- 
wife; whereas, she was simply a high bred woman a little out of order. 
She is a doctor's wife, and f wish you would all take pattern by her. 
Yesterday she looked as usual — like a fashion plate. 

You have seen women, sparsely scattered over the face of the earth, 
who looked precisely as though they had stepped out of the Journal des 
Modes. So looks my elegant friend. Tall and straight as an arrow, she 
dresses perfectly. She wore on this occasion a pale pongee- colored French 
cashmere. The front was made in a multitude of pleats £ inch wide, at 
each side of which a fan-shaped trimming of heavy silk embroidery in the 
same shade was carried up to the waist, and over this skirt was negligently 
draped an over-dress caught up high on the hips and blown together in 
billowy form behind ; the corsage and sleeves being trimmed with the 
same embroidery. An elegant mantle of rich black rep silk, trimmed 
with deep French lace, toned down the dress, and as a hat she wore an 
e*cru straw, with a fanciful spot of glossy brown straw illuminating the 
whole. The hat, which stood up in front, somewhat like the " Postilion," 
was lined with brown satin, and a great bunch of leafless roses in i^cru 
and brown finished the chapeau. Ecru gloves completed the toilette, and 
I could not help thinking what an elegant creature she was. Not young, 
not old, but in that beautiful middle stage in which women have cut their 
wisdom teeth and are as nearly perfect as such an imperfect article can be. 

"You look divine," I said. She laughed. "I copy your teachings 
when I can," she replied. So, of course, I am comme il faut. I do wish 
I could make you all copy my designs and dress like my dear doctor's 
wife. Won't she give it to me when she reads this. You Bee, ladies, that 
by suiting your own style, and wearing appropriate colors, you form art 
pictures severally and separately. They may not be always beautiful 
pictures, but will still be studies to memorize, perfect as a whole; where- 
as, when you who have red hair wear red, and you who have drab hair 
wear " mouse-ear," you look flat, tame and out of gear. My elegant 
friend has black hair and a clear, olive skin, and knows to a nicety what 
suits her. Thus she is always a study that never grates upon the es- 
thetic soul or hurts the esthetic eye. I have observed, as a rule, that the 
homeliest women are the most prone to wear whatever is loudest, fancy- 
ing that by draping themselves in the most noticeable and fashionable 
attire, with the most agonizingly brilliant hueB predominating, they add 
a charm which, in themselves, they lack. How wrong are they, for the 
very brilliancy of their attire only serves to show off more plainly the 
homeliness which nature has endowed them with in spiteful mood. 
Rather let plain women adopt neutral tints, or at any rate something that 
will harmonize with their peculiar style. 

For instance, when you see a very fat woman, who was once a washer- 
woman, but is now wealthy, dressed in a green silk dress, with irredes- 
cent bead-trimming plastered on wherever it can be put, a small capote 
perched above a large face somewhat rubicund, said capote being made of 
gold lace and big mock pearls; yellow gloves two sizes too small for the 
fat hands, you naturally feel Borry for that deluded female. 

She thinks she is O K, and a subject to be admired, but in reality be- 
comes an object of pity in the eyes of people who know "what's what." 

Now, if that fat dame who erewhile disported among the soapsuds would 
confine herself to black silk satin or velvet, how much more becoming it 
would be, and how much less derision she would bring upon herself. 

Apropos, I wonder if rich women who have got up in the world by a 
stroke of luck, and who don't know how to accommodate themselves to 
their improved condition, ever pause to think of what other women say 
about them ? 

Do they even consider, when they give an entertainment and dress 
themselves with the most approved grotesqueness, how the guests — who 
happily kiss them on the cheek at meeting — go hence and have a real 
good time picking them to pieces ? I wonder if they do ? Do you know 
it's awfully good fun to go to a reception among the nouveaux riclie and 
watch them piling on style? To sit in a corner and take notes of the 
manner in which they receive ; you yourself being born to the purple ? 
To listen to the imperfect grammar, etc., etc., and then take notes of the 
exaggerated dress, the over-load of diamonds, etc., etc? Mon dieu, it's 
funny ! I've been there, my friends, in a four-bit black grenadine, with 
nothing but scarlet geranium blossoms to lighten me up, and felt so im- 
measurably higher and better dressed than the hostess that, bad she read 
my thoughts and heard my suppressed titters, she would certainly have 
turned me out. 

Of course, if you grow rich you have to alter your dress, but please 
remember that fine feathers do not always make fine birds. It is better 
to be dressed too little than too much, any day, and a hostess should al- 
ways remember that she Bhould be less dressed than her guests, the reason 
being that those of the invited who are poorer feel distrait if they feel 
inferior in point of dress to the hostess, and those who are richer, or on 
a square level, prefer always to outdo the woman who entertains them. 
It is hard, I know, to talk thuB, but how true it is, my friends! The lit- 
tleness of our sex is unequaled, and no one knows it better than this writer. 

Dress, in fact, is the cause of more misery and dissension than the 
world is aware of — I mean the male world. For dress women will go to 
the devil and back again. It is the Alpha and Omega of all evil, and if I 
had my own way I would say " Go back to the fig-leaves," only the wind 
in these parts would be a little hard upon us. Fig-leaves would save a 
world of trouble, but I guess the sewing-machine agents would be out 
considerably. Silver Pen. 

Literary men hold out long in life. Carlisle, Sir Charles Lyell and 
Darwin were all over three score and ten. Sir Roderick Murchison re- 
cently died at a very advanced age. Michelet, who has just published 
his thirtieth historical work, "HiBtory of the Nineteenth Century," is 76. 
Guizot, at the age of 75, published a history of France. Another buBy 
historian, Miguet, is 77. Victor Hugo is over 74, 



R. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



THE COMING CRUSADE. 
We are evidently in for a big crueade against the House of Lords, 
but it is rather surprising to find the Morning Post beginning it. That 
paper, however, can have no other object in affording us aa it is so fond 
of doing, an insight into the minds of their lordships. This, for instance, 
is what Lord Wincbilsea's is like. The quotation is from a poem of his 
lordship's on " The Diet of Worms ": 

Then there's single control, and a dual that's droll, 

And a Europe to meddle and muddle, 
With no adequate stake for the mess it will make, 

Like a duck in an evergreen puddle. 
Now, if every State that was asked to debate, 

To the hotch-pot a million were adding, 
There might be some chance of dealing with France, 

For Europe means nothing but padding. 
There is Bismarck, no doubt, who can swagger and spout, 

And Russia that works without din, sir; 
And Vienna beside, and Italia " the bride," 
Who always wants jewels thrown in, sir. 
But unless we can treat these worthies to meat, 

The finish is very much foregone ; 
For in spite of the plan of our " Medicine Man," 
They must dance while we pay for the organ. 
Then let us reflect, and in patience expect, 

The outcome of all these vagaries, 
And await the decree, whatever it be, 
Of our great Plenipotentiaries. 
A collection of their lordships' political rhymes, culled from the pages 
of the Post, might be a useful vade mecum for Liberal candidates in case 
of a dissolution. —Pall Mall Gazette. 

MATTERS FOR HUSBANDS TO THINK OF AND PERFORM. 

Do not jest with your wife upon a subject in which there is danger of 
hurting her feelings. Remember, she treasures every word you utter. 
Do not speak of some virtue in another man's wife to remind your own 
of a fault. Do not reproach your wife of personal defects, for if she has 
sensibility you inflict a wound difficult to heal. Do not treat your wife 
with inattention in company. It touches her pride, and she will not love 
you more or respect you better for it. Do not upbraid your wife in the 
presence of strangers; the sense of your regard for her feelings will pre- 
vent her from acknowledging her fault. Do not entertain your wife with 
the praises of other women, of their beauty, or their accomplishments. 
If you would have a pleasant home and a cheerful wife pass your even- 
ings under your own roof. Do not be stern in your own house and re- 
markable in your sociability elsewhere; and, above all, remember that 
from a happy home it is not far to heaven. 

In the history of photographic art, nothing has produced such a rev- 
olution as the Dry Plate, invented and patented by our townsman, Mr. 
Taber, the well-known photographer of No. 8 Montgomery street. This 
plate is so sensitive that it enables the operator to secure first-class nega- 
tives of moving or stationary objects by tbe electric or any other bright 
light, and without the necessity of sun-light. In taking children, animals 
or nervous persons it is invaluable, because it is so quick in its action that 
it enables the operator to catch the subject's most pleasing expression. 
Taber is manufacturing this Plate in large quantities, and sells to the 
trade at reasonable rates. 

To the Ladles. — Mrs. Lewis is now prepared to do the buying for per- 
sons in the interior, and any order received, either for Toilet, Millinery, 
Upholstery, Furniture, Jewelry, Ready-made Clothing, etc., will be 
promptly, correctly and conscientiously attended to. Strpngers in the 
city will find that by calling at Mrs. Lewis' rooms they will gain much 
valuable information. A commission of fifty cents will be charged for 
attending to small orders amounting to §10 or less, but on orders amount- 
ing to more than §10 no commission is charged. Address Mrs. R. G. 
Lewis, Rooms 28 and 29, Thurlow Block, 126 Kearny street. San Francisco. 

Persons who are in need of anything in the nature of first-class dry 
goods should not forget that there is a great clearance sale now in 
progress at the White House, corner of Post and Kearny streets. Messrs. 
Raphael Weill & Co., the new proprietors of this famous establishment, 
have had its magnificent stock turned over to them upon terms which 
enable them to sell at sacrificial prices, and this they are now doing, in 
order to make room for large selections of Fall goods which are now being 
shipped to them from all parts of the world. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' ex- 
perience has proved this remedy to be a specific. Apply immediately af- 
ter returning from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be pre- 
vented. James G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 

BETHESDR 

COOLS THE BLOOD. 



Devoid of Strong Salts— Soft and Delicious. 



43" Persona who indulge in vinous and alcoholic stimulants will find it the 
MOST REFRESHING, ENLIVENING and INVIGORATING draught ever provided 
in the Laboratory of Nature. 

L. CAHEN & SON, 

418 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



I SS| 



CALIFORNIA ADVER1 18ER. 






SOCIETY. 



month ' ■' • , which, from 

..... 

: l\ mornings 
■-'■ '* tie rued I 

dndy ai 

change for the better will 

■ fternoon oon 

ii i b, and the 

■ ■[ rite 

>pen its 

k, ftn.l bids •■■ Ml popular an I 

.ill apparently looking forward to it with 
i i-< the dulln i ing 

• known since the Summer 
id by the sudden do- 
late idolri, there would scarcely have been a 
rest to 1 charmedjtnner 
hi . me - ' in this, ii 
\" isoo in iv not be t dceo in bo 
i tho K are bo* 

i t-' its very canter, pr »b tltl - from the whole-souled way in 
which the frauda hi Ived and taken to the heartbfl and homes 

mingly, only too willing to be deceived. 
Tin- arrival ol the English war vessel, Constance, caused n more pleas- 
urable little ripple, and one or two parties, which were made np in rather 
i'ii pto manner, wei rd and treated by the officers 

stpitably. What u pit) it Is that such " 

ly, and we - .■■■ to know our visitors 

t'bye." 

:■ the Third Ltegiment go into camp .it Monte- 
the nnd of August, and lively times at that I 

sd for during any of the troops. At Monte ■ 

Lawn fannis seems I recr i i n al present) and 

. I here all the season ure becoming 

.t the game. Ft i> played moat vigorously and unceasingly 

at Sin I; .ii-I, the residents of that little buru'h never tiring of the eoer- 

Incited by their example, Saucelito has formed a Lawn 

Tennu '■ nvhich bills fair t-» become a very formidable rival t<> 

Phe young ladies there are practicing at all hours, bq 

as (•> i Ives in the shortest space of time, though they by no 

ct their boating exercise, which is kept up with unflagging 

\l-ui_v circles, too, have entered the lists, ami the game, as played 

. Point, is by no means an inferior one, In short. Lawn Tennis 

of the 'lay, ano! iu predecessor, Croquet, is now never 

even mention 

A newly-announced engagement is that »'f Miss Mary Meares and 
Lieut, G "irmy. ana is one which will give sincere pleasure to 

- Friends of the fair bride elect, who is one of the most 
popular and admired young ladies in Bociefcy. The wedding day is 
named for early in September, and already the happy pair Lire in re- 
. congratulations innumerable and beat wishes tor their future 
happim nt of Mr. Nichols and Miss Lou Dearbome 

i ie to .in abrupt conclusion. Mr. Nichols returns to China with- 
out delay, and Mi D rboi will, I hear, accompany her father to 
Australia, when the Sydnt y sails on Saturday. 

The i meut between Mr. Frank H. Runyon and Miss 

Lulu McBride is authoritatively contradicted. 
Maria Stacom is goin£ Bast, to return September 1st. 
Amoi mine absentees this week are : Col. and Mrs, J, D. Fry, 

from their trip to Alaska, with the addition of Mrs. Fry's Bon, Mr. Jack 
Hay. and his newly-made bride, who will remain at the maternal mansion 
on a visi titration ; Mrs. I >r, Bowie, from a visit across the con- 

tinent to the old folks at home away up North; Mrs. Bolado and her 

m Monterey ; Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shaw, from San Jose ; 

Mrs. Kip and the Durbrows, from Santa Barbara, from 

Soger and family are expected to arrive to-day; Robert 

Watt and family, from Los Angeles; Mr. and Mrs, J. V. Swift, the 

former from his tour of the world, greatly improved in health, the latter 

From New Fork, where she went to meet her husband half way home ; 

Henry Hey man ami Sands Forman. from the Sandwich Islands; the 

Thornton family, from their ranche ; Mrs, Jack Hays ami Miss Betty, 

from Monterey : and Mrs. Urquehardt, from Portland, on a visit to her 

■ Eastland. Sir Harry ParkeaJs also among the arrivals 

of the week, but sails for Australia on Saturday next. 

Mrs. Collier has been up from Monterey during the week, and Mrs. 
Saggin and Miss Rita have gone down there to remain during Mr. Hae- 
bsence in Montana, The Deans are looked for next week from 
In. Mrs. Parrottand Miss May are expected bark in September, 
and will be accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Dick, who will probably make 
a long visit to California, certainly during a portion of the Winter, Mrs. 
Di,k- ; inga milder climate than that of her new home in 

Great Britain. Miss May's wedding will probably take place in the 
Spring, though nothing definite is yet known regarding it. Felix. 



VlCTOBIA, B. C„ July 24, 1884. 

Ed. News Letter: May I ask you to give apace in your most valuable 
journal to the following list of Victoria news, viz: 

That Victoria mnv boasts of a " B. ( '. Garrison Artillery," of which 
Major D i.s in command. He has a gay Lothario, S , for a Lieuten- 
ant. The said Lieutenant S missed two particular drills while flirt- 

h two of San Francisco's fair belles, who were on a visit to "Beacon 

." at Victoria. Major D smarted to ^ive Lieut. S fits, when 

the Lieutenant told Major D to "go to where no blankets are requir- 
ed," and that he would see kirn d— d, and that said Major D did not 

dare ask him to resign. Major D put bis tail between his legs and 

said: "Please, Lieutenant S , come up to the Union Club aud take a 

drink," 

This is the way we run military matters in British Columbia. We 
thought the people in your city might wish to copy us. 



MALE BEAUTIES. 
j 
Mcrvyn Donahue A bi I .11. slightly bull I Rj ore, bl i 

and <\ ■ 

1 i '. Ideml-brunette. Tall, well-built thru* dways 

I arli bur, blue area, ibadad wl 

heavy dark n quareout oMa betokens bis plUhfa na 

ture. Keeps so much to himself I ■ t . n 

beaire, \\<«t\A not ki ■. and abhors 

everything fast, even ' 

L. BL Hull.: ; i riUlanl lawyer, h ti baisl ey< -. brown 

kacne, i) f the W'»*t. but least showy, 

Large, fine form, full of soul and Undo frleod 

and an untiring enemy, Ivoids crowds, and is as ai i 

■ Frowns, A \ iw "> rker, with ■■■ i to having bis 

in the papers and to i liaci id shaking, laasingli 

by choii 1 With all that limn- V DAD buy. 

T. I '. Mi K»y - Tall and slight, aa active as a kitten and as smooth aaa 
suoking dove. Particularly p polar with visitors and tourists from An- 
tral ia. who generally Bhow their appreciation by going Bast over the ' ' . 

Ik ft Q. and Hannibal and St Joe roads. 

Pacific Congress Springa.—Tln's d.di-htful Summer resort hi 

thoroughly rated tbro >.. hout, and ii u w open t" the public, There 

la do more pleasant place to apend a few weeks than this, and Mr. W. 
II. Stedman does bis utmost to make his guests comfortable and at home, 
there is excellent trout fishing to be bad in the immediate vicinity, and 
pleasant picnic parties arc constantly being gotten up. The water from 
the springs bas bo many healthful qualities, and is so well known here, 

imment from ua is Deed less. K ■■ can be secured by addre iu 

\Y. II. St.. -adman, Saratoga, California, Stages connect at Los Gatns 
with 8:30 a. m. and 2:30 p. m. trains. S. !'. ( \ K. R. Through fare, |2 10. 

The Telegraph Hill Observatory is a resort which grows more and 

more attractive the more it is visited. In addition to the music, dai 
and other attractions, which are to be found iu the main hall, there are 
the magnificent advantages of view of which one never tires, aud which 
can be enjoyed under the most favorable conditions. Choice refreshments 
are served at ordinary prices. 

Every Saturday afternoon there will be a grand concert at the Park, 
and at the Ocean Beach there will be some new attraction each Saturday 
and Sunday. The Market-street cable cars run direct to the Park, and 
connect with the Ocean Beach Road. Thousands will, without doubt, 
avail themselves of this great public convenience. 

The Fountain Theatre continues to net first-class attractions. Next 
week there will be several new people. Maggie Foster, a recognized vocal 
queen, and Lydia llosa, a talented song and dance artiste, will make their 
first appearances there. 

Prior to quitting Paris for the Summer Mr. Maekay sent a Large 
sum to be distributed among the poor of Toulon. 



'^twTiesU 



le/ 







\AutAVtyCtfpiA6. 



4? ,;»**■ HM M* 



BLANKETS! 



We have opened a Special Department for the Sale of 

Blankets and Comfortables. 

We will show as large, if not a larger, Stock than 
can be Found in San Francisco. 



Gtreat X !XI Hi 3 

Corner Kearnv and Commercial streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1884, 



THE SUBALTERN'S GUARD. 

Several years ago I was a lieutenant in a marching regiment, and 
quartered in a large garrison town in England. My duties consisted in 
the usual routine of morning and afternoon drill and parade, and about 
once a fortnight it would come to a fellow's turn to mount guard, and sub- 
mit to twenty-four hours confinement to barracks. 

It is one of the regulations of the service that when officers or men are 
on guard, they should be ready to " fall in " on parade at a moment's no- 
tice. If you feel very sleepy and desire rest, you must take it while you 
are buttoned up to the throat ; a snooze on the sofa is all the officer on 
duty is supposed to indulge in. Among my brother subalterns in garri- 
son, however, it was customary to set the Articles of War at defiance, 
and turn into bed as soon as the field officer had made his nightly visit. 

It was a bitter, cold morning in January that my turn for guard came 
on. I marched my men to their posts, relieved the old guard, and then, 
having gone through the regular routine of duty- and dined, endeavored 
to pass the time until the field-officer had visited me. The previous eve- 
ning I had been to a ball in town, and- felt very sleepy, so I anxiously 
looked forward to the time when it would be safe for me to turn in. 

At length I heard the welcome challenge, " Who comes there ? " which 
was answered in the usual manner: "Rounds," " What Rounds," 
"Grand Rounds" and "Guard turn out." 

Shipping on my cloak and cap and grasping my sword, I placed myself 
in front of the guard and received the field-officer, who bristly asked me 
if all was correct, directed me to dismiss my guard, and rode off without 
even saying good night, a proceeding I thought rather strange. Giving 
directions to the sergeant to call me in an hour, for the purpose of visit- 
ing the outpostB, I threw myself into an arm chair and tried to read a 
novel. The time passed quickly, as I had a short nap, and soon the ser- 
geant appeared with a lantern to conduct me round the sentries. 

It was a terrible night, the wind blowing hard, whilst the snow and the 
sleet were driving before it. The thermometer was down below the freez- 
ing point, and I felt that I deserved much from my country for perform- 
ing my duties so conscientiously. The sentries were very much scattered, 
so that I had to walk nearly two miles to visit them all. I accomplished 
my taak, however, and returned to the guard-room, where I treated my- 
self to a stiff glass of grog, and throwing off my regimentals I jumped 
into bed, feeling that I really deserved the luxury. 

In a few minutes I was sound asleep and dreaming of the pretty girl I 
had danced with the night before, when suddenly I became conscious of 
a great noise, which sounded like a drum being beaten. At first I did not 
realize my position, and could not remember where I was, but at last it 
flashed upon me that I was on guard, and that something was the matter. 
Jumping out of bed I called out to know what the row was about. 

The sergeant entered in a great hurry, saying, "Sir, the field-officer is 
coming and the guard is turning out." 

Mentally consigning my chief to the hot place for coming the double 
on me, I rushed to my boots, pulled them on over my bare feet, thrust 
my sword arm into my regimental cloak, which I gathered round me, put 
on my forage cap, and grasping my sword, looked, to the casual observer, 
as though fit for parade. 

I was just in time to receive the field-officer, who again asked me if my 
guard was correct. I answered gruffly, "Yes, sir, all correct." 

I could not imagine why my guard should have been visited a second 
time, as such a proceeding was very unusual, and I fancy that my tone 
rather nettled the colonel. Whether it was that, or whether a treacher- 
ous gust of wind raised my cloak and exposed my shirt-tail, I know not ; 
but the chief, instead of riding off when he had received my answer, turn- 
ed his horse's head in the opposite direction and said, " Now, sir, I want 
you to accompany me round the sentries." 

Had he told me that he wanted me to accompany him to the regions 
below I should scarce have been more horror struck, for already I had 
found the change of temperature from a warm bed to the outside air ; 
and to walk two miles through a snow storm, with nothing on but my 
shirt, cloak and boots, was really suffering for one's country and no mis- 
take ; it beat anything I had experienced in the trenches before Sebasto- 
pol all hollow. I would have given a month's pay to have dodged the in- 
evitable, but dared not show the least hesitation, and on the appearance 
of a Corporal with a lantern we started on our tour of inspection. The 
field-officer asked me several questions regarding the position and duties 
of the various sentries, to which I gave answers as well as the chattering 
of my teeth would permit me. The most dangerous work, however, was 
passing the gas lamps, which were placed at intervals of about one hun- 
dred yards. It was blowing so hard that it was with difficulty I could 
hold my cloak around me, so as to conceal the absence of my trowsers. 
Every now and then an extra gust of wind would come around a corner 
and defeat my precautions. I managed to dodge as much in the shade as 
possible, and more than once ran the risk of being kicked by the officer's 
horse, as I had to sneak behind him on approaching a gas-lamp. 

It was terribly cold, to be sure, and my legs were like icicles. I had 
a kind of faint hope that the field-officer might think I belonged to a 
Highland Regiment, and in the dark take my shirt for a kilt. I struggled 
and shivered along, however, knowing that the beastly tramp could not 
last forever. 

We had nearly completed our tour, and were within a few hundred 
yards of the guard room, when we passed the field -officer's quarters. I 
fundly hoped that he would not pass them, and would dismiss me at the 
door. I was rather surprisd to see lights in all the windows, and to hear 
the sound of music. It was evident that there was a hop going on inside, 
and I already began to tremble from a surt of foreboding that there were 
greater misfortunes in store for me. 

My premonitions were only too true, for on reaching the door my perse- 
cutor, in quite a cheerful tone, said: " Well, we've had a cold tour ; you 
must now come in and take a glass of wine, and perhaps a waltz will 
warm you." 

" I'm really much obliged," I answered, " but I should not like to leave 
my guard." "Nonsense, nonsense, man; the guard will be all right. 
You really must come in." This must he said in quite a determined tone, 
and I now felt convinced the old pirate had ' tumbled' to the shirt. I 
felt desperate, and again declared that I did not feel justified in leaving 
my guard. "Ill take the responsibility," said the demon, " so come 
along." Saying which he caught me by the arm, and almost dragged me 
into the porch of his quarters. 



When we entered the hall and were exposed to the light of the lamps, 
all doubt was removed from my mind, for I saw by the twinkle in the 
officer's eye that he was "fly" to tie true state of affairs. He quickly 
took off his cloak, at the same time telling me to do the same. Seeing 
me hesitate he said, " Come, look alive ; off with it." 

Further remonstrance, I knew, would be useless, so there was no help 
for me but a full confession. Summoning all my courage I blurted out, 
'' Colonel, I have no trowsers on." 

" The deuce you haven't," he said. " Well, you had better go and put 
them on, and then come here as soon as possible and have a glass of some- 
thing warm." 

I rushed out of his quarters, half determined not to return, but no 
sooner had dressed myself than the Colonel's servant came over to tell 
me that I was expected at once. 

I determined to put a bold face on, and entered the drawing-room, 
where a party of about fifty had assembled. It was evident, by the sub- 
dued smiles of the ladies and the broad grins of the men, that my story 
was known. 

The colonel had told it as a good joke to the major, who had whispered it 
to his wife ; she, of course, repeated it to a couple of her intimate friends, 
and in five minutes every one in the room knew that I had gone the 
rounnds in my shirt. 

As long as I staid in that garrison I was a standing joke. Wheu the 
girls saw me they looked away and smiled, and it seemed as impossible 
for me to obtain a serious answer from any of them as for a clown to 
preach a sermon. They even seemed afraid to dance with me, fearing, as 
I afterward heard, that I might be short on trowsers. I soon exchanged 
into another regiment, and years afterward heard my story told in a 
crowded room, all the details being true except the name of the perform- 
er, my 8crape having been attributed to a poor fellow who died in India. 
I never went to bed on guard after that. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. 

The copiousness of the English tongue, as well as the difficulty of ac- 
quiring the ability to use its immense vocabulary correctly, is well ex- 
hibited in the following array of synonymous words, which, if not new, 
is yet a capital illustration of the nice distinctions which characterize so 
many of our vocables. It is no wonder that we slip "occasionally, even 
the wariest of us: A little girl was looking at the picture of a number of 
ships, wheu she exclaimed : " See what a flock of ships ! " We corrected 
her by saying that a flock of ships is called a fleet, and that a fleet of 
sheep is called a flock. And here we would add, for the benefit of the 
foreigner who is mastering the intricacies of our language in respect to 
nouns of multitude, that a flock of girls is called a bevy, that a bevy of 
wolves is called a pack, and a pack of thieves is called a gang, and that 
a gang of angels is called a host, and a host of porpoises is called a 
shoal, and a shoal of butf.does is called a herd, and a herd of children is 
called a troop, and a troop of partridges is called a covey, and a covey 
of beauties is called a galaxy, and a galaxy of ruffians is called a horde, 
and a horde of rubbish is called a heap, and a heap of oxen is called a 
drove, and a drove of blackguards is called a mob, and a mob of whales is 
called a school, and a school of worshipers is called a congregation, and 
a congregation of engineers is called a corps, and a corps of robbers is 
called a band, and a band of locusts is called a swarm, and a swarm of 
people is called a crowd, and a crowd of gentlemen is called the elite, and 
the elite of the city's thieves and rascals is called the roughs. 

How About Foreign Missions?— It is a fixed fact that over four 
millions of dollars are annually expended for the support of jails and 
prisons in the State of New York, and that 90.000 offenders are locked 
up every year, 10,000 of whom are sentenced, after conviction, to terms 
of imprisonment in the jails or penitentiaries. This is a discouraging 
record. While in prison this constantly-increasing army of convicts be- 
come more degraded than before, and when released are, as a general 
thing, more dangerous than before they entered. Neither civilization nor 
Christiauity can be said to do their work very effectually while such sta- 
tistics stare us in the face. 

Centenarian Birds.— Among the feathered creation, the eagle and the 
raven, the swan and the parrott are each centenarians. An eagle kept in 
Vienna died after a confinement of 114 years ; and on an ancient oak in 
Selborne, England, still known as "Toe Raven Tree," the same pair of 
ravens are believed to have fixed their residence for over ninety years. 
Swans on the River Thames — about whose ages there can be no mistake, 
since they are nicked annually by the Vinter's Company, under whose 
keeping they have been for five centuries— have been known to survive 
150 years and more. 

Books Written in Prison.— Three of the most wonderful works that 
ever came from the pen of men were wrote by their authors while in pri- 
son, namely: "The History of the World " was written by Sir Walter 
Raleigh. "Don Quixotte" was written by Cervantes while in prison, and 
last {not least) " Pilgrim's Progress " was by John Bunyan, a work that 
was " born to live." It is a singular fact that in the entire work there is 
not a French or Latin word used in it, nor is there a word of five syllables 
used. 

If you want anything in the way of Japanese Goods, go to Marsh & 
Co.'s, No. 625 Market street. Twelve years' residence in Japan has given 
them unusual facilities. 

There is no other Toilet Soap in the world which combines genuine 
merit and economy so thoroughly and admirably as Boncuti. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Sparnud f.oihbaiik, ?io.5^6 California street, San 
Francisco. Okfickrs : President, L. GOTTIG. Board of Directors.— L. 
Gottig, Fred Roeding, Cha3. Kohler, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Peter "Sprecktila, A. E. Hecht. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorneys, 
JARBOE & HARRISOX. May IS. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

NO. 18 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

Incorporated November 24th, 1S69. — Adolph €. Weber, 
President; Ernst Brand, Secretary. Loans at Low Rates. 



AQg. -\ 1884. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



MALE BEAUTIES. 



of lh« pU«fnnaUo typ*. Oiunky tig- 
:t-iy on, brown hair, worn wwl 



Gasa Frank A damj bronsttc 
iir.*, ImpassJvs (aatoraa. thiol no 
down on tha (orahaad, oUvi ioort mustache and ■ parpotuaj 

in-, m< ii. tii. Ail. . ■ ioal . nti. . and of all tiiinc ad- 

Bursa a snft, sweet voioe to woman. I- generous anil kind hearted i" a 

fault, anil hi ale Ui <l upon by <lau>*«*l* in < lis trees. 

Drnry Meloi led brunette. Sharp black eyes, which gener 

aliy takei in all there h la be aseo : black hair, which has been Dior.- pro* 
Pan ; dork oomploxii I, excepting for ■ maataohe 

and a roioa like ■ ooolnej <l the medium bight, rather heavily 

built, ami b quick and decided both in ppooob ami action* Pin*- and on- 
idolteratad benevolence ti bis distinRuisning knit, and -i sharp p] 

u BoaethiDg quite beneath ■ christian and ■ gentle- 
nun. 

Joe TQdan A brunette, rotund in form and jovial inspirit l*.irk 
hair ami ana, the briUianoy of which he oonoaala with a pair <<f specs ; 
round fat face, long whiskers and cloeely-cul mustache. Is particularly 
neat in his peraonaj appoaranco, and bo simple in his taenia lie would 
starre t.> death rather loan cook a weal for himself. OarefuUy .slum-' the 
Bohemian Club and iti members. 

Arthur Page A light brunette, darkish hair and eyea. decidedly re- 
feroHsai Doaa, and eouaiJy undecided complexion ; tall and slightly built, 
but in spite of his length of limb walks with Bhort little mincing steps. 
Is never so happy an when holding wool for the girls to wind, and is pop- 
olarly suppoaed to sleep with Hyn>n ami Robinson Crusoe under liis pil- 
low, taking turns at each during his waking momeuts. 

James Whartonby— A demi- blonde. Light hair— what there is left of 
it tinged with gray, long scraggy whiskers and mustache to match. 
Largs nose, deeply-set gray eyes, and rather undersized spare figure. 
Aspire* t<> the Gubernatorial Chair, tells a good story and loves a gener- 
nui glass "f wine, few being able to resist the conviviality of his temper. 
But he eann.it be induced to enter a theatre, and never visits a place of 
amusement <>f any description whatever. 

Count Smith -A deeply, darkly, beautifully blue dark brunette. Short 
and itout in Bgnre, which is always immaculately clad, very white teeth, 
rather heavy nose, piercing black eyes, black hair, always parted to a 
nicety, and carefully kept black whiskers and mustache ; a graceful walk- 
er, and would be invaluable in a hotel but for his defective memory, be- 
in- totally unable to remember either names or faces. 

Consul Olavonsky -A picturesque blonde. Very light hair, blue eyes, 
dimly seen through a pair of Boston iluiible-eye glasses ; smooth, fat face, 
with a delicate little mustache, and puggy, fat little figure. Walks with 
stately grace, but takes most of his exercise on the velocipede. Is best 
known as a determined " woman-hater," and detests music as he does 
the d . 

O. P. Kvans — A deuii-brunette, of fine figure and imposing presence. 
KeddUh brown hair and beard, straight nose, blue eyes, and an open, 
fearless cast of contenance. Spends his time studying the navigation of 
Salt River, and hopes in time to arrive by it at the Supreme Bench. 

Cameron Alexander— A true blonde of the fairylike order of architect- 
ure. Gohlen hair, blue eyes, clean shaved, round fat face and a roman 
nose. Is always immaculate in his attire, his clothes fitting like gloves 
his slight trim figure, and all his movements are so quick and energetic 
one would think sleep or even drowusiness were unknown qualities in his 
composition. 

Raphael Weill — A handsome brunette. Clear, olive complexion, smooth 
skin, almost satiny in texture, dark eyes, which he knows well how to 
use with effect ; black hair, round, full face, and a love of a mustache ; 
medium bight, always scrupulously well-dressed, a universal favorite ; 
the ladies call him a " regular duck," although his aversion to the fair 
sex, especially those of the Bouffe persuasion, has passed almost into a 
proverb ; never weary of well-doing, and has that rari avis a faithful ser- 
vant of the public while in office. 

Robert F. Morrow — A demi-brunette. Medium size, thick-set figure, 
sandy hair, which he wears in long, curly locks, blue eyes, clean-shaved, 
save a long drooping mustache. Is always well-dressed, especially in the 
hat line. Is the essence of refinement both in manner and speech, as well 
as in thought, and seriously inclines toward accepting the chair of Belle 
Ltttres at the University should it be offered him. 

Howard Coit — A blonde of the massive order of architecture. A round, 
fat, cleau-shaved, expressionless face, flahby cheeks, watery blue eyes, 
rather thin hair, shading, but not covering, a large head ; heavily-built, 
tall figure, and inclines to shamble in his walk. Is nothing if not grate- 
ful, carrying that characteristic to a fine art. Ntver forgets a kindness, 
nor fails to return one when opportunity offers. 

Gen. Thomas Williams — Is a blonde. Tall, slight figure, square 
shoulders, palid, clean-shaved face, blue eyes and rather scanty locks of 
pale gold hair. Is noted for the warm-hearted generosity with which he 
dispenses charity, though he seldom lets his right hand know what his 
left bestows. Abhors gossip, and is reticence personified. 

Phil Lillienthal — A decided brunette, with clear-cut features. Olive 
complexion, black eyes and close-cut beard, covering a well-shaped chin. 
Is the apostle of abstemiousness, never dances, never smokes, never 
drinks, rarely eats, and is seldom seen abroad o' nights. 

Kobt. Tobin, Jr. — A strawberry blonde. Slight, trim figure, about the 
medium bight, a thick crop of reddish hair covering a rather small head, 
blue eyes and long thin face, adorned with a heavy red mustache. Is 
never so happy as when on escort duty. Aspires to lead in the field of 
glory, and, deeming a uniform a sine qua non as a part of the training for 
a true son of Mars, wears one on every possible aud impossible occasion. 

John Benson — A brunette, verging on the frost of winter. A round 
face, well covered with a closely-cut beard, dark eyes, undersized, chunky 
figure, and a slow, languid movement in walking. Is musical in his tastes, 
possessing a high tenor voice of great brilliancy, but he can seldom be in- 
duced to let it be heard. Is ambitious of being considered a masher, never 
enters a club, and spends his time principally on street corners. 

Alfred Goddefroy — A perennial blonde. Clear-cut features, blue eyes, 
liudit hair, rather thin face and long silky mustache, which is cultivated 
with the greatest tenderness. Wears a single eye-glass, is a graceful 
dancer, an energetic walker, is counted A No. 1 in the skating rink, sings 
a capital song, but seldom dines out, as he cares nothing for the pleasures 
of the table, and U noted for his avoidance of the fair sex. 



BANKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Hoy i% I (Imrlor. Capital |n»M up, SI, 730, • 
■ i ■ ■ i .i. reass to 110,000,000 Boserva Fund, 1 1 0,000 ft i 
corner Osilfonua end rtrosta Head Offlos t& Camhlll, i 

branches - Portland, Oregon; Victoria ind Mew WeftmlnsO i table. 

: .uk LrutMcta a Oem n\l Buikli 

rented avaiui>i< 
lbs world tills dl* ountod I ■ 

Drawidiraof it warrant rates upon lu B i iirmnchoo.aiHi uj 

as follow m : 

New Fork, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool- North and South 
Wales Bank j BooUaud British Linen Oosnpanj ; Ireland -Bank of inland ; Mex- 
ico and Soutfa ami irlas London Ban! • •t Uezloo ind South Una and 
Japan— Charter! <i Bank ol India, Australia and China ; Australia ind Nee ■ ■ 
—Bank ol Commercial Btnhrlng Company of Sydney, English, Scottish 
nd Aiiwinili.ui Chartered Itunk. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000. 

WM. ALVORD l-ri-.iil.nt. 

THOMAS BKOWN, Cashier | B. Ml KKAV, Jr., Amh'1 Ca«uler 
Aoaicre : 

Now York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornla ; Boston, Trcmont National Bank, 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Itank ; New Zealand, 
the Bunk of New Zealand. Correspondent in London, Messrs. N. II Rothschild a 
Sons. Correspondents in India, China, Japan and Australia. . 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the princi- 
pal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Paclft Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available In all parte of the world. Draw direct on New 
York, Boston, Chisago, st., Louis. New Orleans, Denver, Bait Lake, Cincinnati, 

Purt'and, O., Los Angeles, Loudon, Dublin, l'unn, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, 
Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Co|»oiihagoii, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, 
and all cities in Italy and Switzerland, 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Paid up Capital 91,500,000, Gold. President, Daulcl Cal- 
la?haii. Vice-President, GEORGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. D. MiHttJAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE, 

Directors.— D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, Peter Donahue, Isaac Wormssr, James 
Phelan, James Motiitt, N. Van Bergen, James II. Jennings, Qeorge A. Low. 

CORRESPONDENTS.— London: Bank of Montreal, No. B Birehin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : BlackBtone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to cheek or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital. 82, 100.000. 

Sau Francisco Office, -v* I California Mtreet; Londou Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, +8 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan & CO.; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Bunkiug 
and Exchange Business in Londou and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June )), 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy aud Powell streets, Sau FrauclHco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate ut current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July. 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.50 per cent. 

DIRECTORS — David Farquharsotl (President), Robert F. Bunker (Vice-President), 
John Bain (Treasurer). John EastOO (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdcrv (Attorney), A. 0. 
Corbett, Edward Farrcll, Joseph K. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Charles D. Earquhar- 
son, Chaa. Lux. [July 12. J Vernon" Campbell, Secretary. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets. 

Loudon Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Assents, J. W. Sel- 
ignian & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, &1, 000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange aud Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

FRED. F. LOW, ( „ „„,.„„ 

ION. STEINHART, f Managers. 

P. N. LlLiBNTnAL, Cashier. Sept. 13. 



THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Agreucy at New York, 63 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. Nov. 8. 

Oharles Orocker, R. 0. "Woolworth, Wm. H. Orocker. 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS, 

322 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 

C lurry on a General Banking Business. Correspondents 
j in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June 16. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL 0300,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1881. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

"We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's. "--Tom Moore, 

Giannini's singing of "Ah, si ben mio," on Monday night, was as de- 
lirious a bit of vocalization as it has ever been my lut to listen to. There 
are but few tenors who do justice to this pearl of Manrico's score. It is 
generally sung without regard to its sentiment, and almost bawled out. 
Uiannini treats it with tenderness and sings it softly, with a decree of 
soul that touches the hearts of his listeners. The "Di quella Pira" 
was, not unexpectedly, very tamely sung. I do not refer to the singer's 
failure to emit a clear hiyh C. That is but a traditional tour deforce, not 
to be found iu the score, and the innocents who furiously applaud it are 
generally taken in by the substitution of a B for the C. But the aria 
lacked effectiveness. There was too much consciousness about G-iannini's 
efforts, and too much anticipation on the part of his admirers. There is 
but little intrinsic merit to the aria anyway. The situation is a very 
dramatic one, but its strength is not reflected in its musical expression. 
"Deserto Sulla Terra," and "Ah, che la morte," were both admirably 
sung. In his share of the several concerted numbers Giannini upheld his 
sudden fame. In the " Infida ' trio, in the first act, he was highly dra- 
matic, both in singing and acting. In the delicious phrase with Leonora 
immediately succeeding "Ah, si ben mio," he sang with rare sweetness. 
Giannini deserves high rank among the tenors of the day. His lack of 
success in New York, two seasons ago, is said to have been due to stage- 
fright. Of the great future before him there can be but little doubt. He 
is young and ambitious, aad if possessed of sufficient self-control to hus- 
band his strength, will make his mark in the musical world. From pres- 
ent appearances, he lacks this very necessary quality. He is now singing 
under very trying climatic conditions, and he should be prudent. Aida 
is a trying opera. The part of Hhadames is a heavy and arduous task. 
Giannini's over-exertions in such music are dangerous. If he is a great 
tenor, it is due not only to his voice, but also to bis con amore method, 
and yet in this very attribute lies his danger. He is too impetuous, too 
anxious to please. He has his voice under perfect control, but not him- 
self. Giannini is very much, both in voice and manner, like Mazzoleni, 
the great New York success of '65-'67. 

* # * * # 

Vilmant, the baritone, was but a fair Conte di Luna. He sustained 
his share of the "Infida" trio, and of the " Qual Voce" duet iu the 
fourth act, very effectively, but this was principally due to his forcible 
acting. His singing of " II Baleu " was commonplace. Vilmant's voice 
is rich and musical in quality, but it lacks both penetration and modu- 
lation. 

* * - * * 

Mestres's Azucena was in great contrast with her Amneria. As the 
Gipsy, she sang better than she acted. Serbolini, the basso, sang Fer- 
nando's opening aria with genuine expression, and lifted this character 
above its usual insignificance. 

***** 

Maria Peri is a singer with a lyric soprano voice and a dramatic soprano 
method. Her voice is too light for dramatic music, her method too heavy 
for florid music. There is sweetness to her voice. It is of pleasing quality. 
It is expressive. But it is totally devoid of flexibility. It can not suc- 
cessfully cope with even the slightest bit of fioriture. As Aida, Maria 
Peri is dramatic in manner and expressive in voice, but the lack of breadth 
and depth in her vocal orgau militates against a perfectly satisfactory 
realization of the character. As Leonora, a part which requires both dram- 
atic and coloratur singing, she failed to reach that degree of merit which, 
notwitstanding her vocal deficiency, she attained as Aida. She was at 
her best in the "Infida" trio in the first act, in " L'onda di suoni 
mistici " duet with Manrico, the complement to " Ah, si ben mio," in the 
"tiual Voce" duet, and in her share of the "Miserere." The two 
florid arias of the score " Di tale amor" in the first act and " D' amor 
sull' ali rosce " in the fourth act, were both sung with a total absence 
uf execution. The runs were blurred. The trills were simply omitted, 
except where the tempo permitted of sustained notes, which, with the 
natural tremolo of Peri's higher register, did service instead. Granting 
to Peri certain pleasing qualities of voice — sweetness and expressiveness 
—it must be confessed that they do not compensate for the inability to 
sing with technical accuracy. 

Although the music of Trovatore for chorus and orchestra is but child's 
play as compared to that of Aida, the ensemble of the simpler opera was 
iuferior to that of the more difficult. This fact was not recognized by 
the audience, which showered applause on the performance in all its parts- 
barring the exquisitely sung "Ah, si ben mio"— applause of an enthusiastic 
character not evoked by a combination of Patti, Nicolini and Galaasi. 

* * * * * 

Damerini, the prima donna, has had a good rest. She is an admirable 
dramatic soprano. On Thursday Norma wis produced. Marchetti's Buy 
Bias is in rehearsal. The Huguenots and two new operas are shortly to 
be produced. A change of base to the Grand Opera House is more than 
probable. The success of this company is as genuine a one as San Fran- 
cisco has seen for years. It is a creditable furore, as it is based upon 
artistic merit and not upon fashionable excitement. While some of the 
troupe are open to strong criticism, there is an artistic evenness to the 
performances that appeals to all true lovers of operatic art. And there is, 
as a special attraction, a tenor among tenors. 

* * * # » 

Leon and Cushmau's entertainment is the variety part of a Minstrel 
programme, arranged in continuous form. In its incidental features there 
is much amusement of the usual variety sort. The Ill-FedDora bur- 
lesque is not particularly funny, nor is it particularly refined. Adams 
and Casey do their well-known clever musical act. Leon, the best of fe- 
male impersonators, of the kind so prevalent on the Minstrel stage, is a3 
lively as ever, but his voice lias fled. The Excelsior ballet is fairly satir- 
ized. The Baseball burlesque is the cleverest thing of the entertainment. 
To those versed and interested in our national game— the king of field- 
games, in my opinion— there is abundant food for laughter in this amus- 
ing caricature. 

***** 

The third week of Orpheus commenced with a change of songs and 
wigs, and ended with a change of actors and actresses. Hebe, Diana and 



Venus changed the color of their hair, affording a pleasing contrast to 
their former appearance. Digby Bell sang " It Will Never, Never do to 
Tell Upon the Street," a clever topical song composed by W. T. Barton, a 
clever fellow, who is too modest about his talents. Laura Joyce sang the 
Tic-Tac Bong from Nell Oywne, and Vanoni introduced, in her specialties, 
the Bruscambille Chauson, from La Jolie Parformcase. On Thursday, 
owing to some salary trouble, several of the company, including Digby 
Bell, Vanoni and Ida Mulle, retired from the cast, necessitating several 
changes. I have not as yet been able to see the performance in its new 
aspect, and must defer speaking of it. This entertainment has not met 
with the success it really deserves. 

* * * *■ * 

On the big stage of the Grand Opera House The Devil's Auction ap- 
pears to greater advantage than it did, cramped for room, at the Bush 
Street Theatre. The scenery looks better, the ballet does better work, 
and the whole show gains in merit. The Black Crook will be produced 
next week, and a great spectacular setting is promised. 

Fatinitza will follow Un Ballo at the Tivoli. 

***** 

E. N. Thayer, an old and reliable actor, will take a benefit this (Satur- 
day) evening, at the California. The White Slave will be produced with 
a good cast, including the beneficiary's pretty daughter. 

In the Ranks, one of Sims and Pettitt's melodramas, with a strong com- 
pany, will open the Autumn season at the Baldwin, August 18th. 
Manager Hayman goes East shortly, and will try to induce Irving and 
Bernhardt to visit San Francisco. 

* * * ■*- * 

Remenyi is in town, on his way to Australia. His concert season has 
been abandoned. 

***** 

Mme. Patti, according to one of the directors of the Academy of Music, 
did not receive any $5,000 a night. That sum, he says, was only an ad- 
vertising dodge. Among musical people on Fourteenth street the opinion 
is freely expressed that the illustrious diva's fee was about §2,000 a per- 
formance. Whatever la Diva received, it is very certain that during her 
last performance in New York she did not draw. Twenty three hundred 
dollars was all that was taken at the last Patti performance, but it must 
be remembered that there was no subscription. It must also be remem 
bered that during this series Gerster drew only §250 into the house one 
night. I have my information on pretty good authority. Beaoolerc. 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Saturdav, August 2d, Matinee. -CAMBIAQGtO, SIEN1 £ LAMPANI'S 
GRAND ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY! 

AND HBAITKAKAXCK OF 

SISNORA VIRGINIA DAMERINI! 
IL TROValORE! 

In Preparation -KUY ULAS. Reserved Seats naw on sale. 
Sa'urday Evening, August 2d-Benefit of E. N. THAYER, The White Slave ! 
Sunday Bveniiur, August 3d— Grand German Performance. BANUMANN, BBAU- 
DET and Complete German Dramatic Company. August 2. 

At „„„ „ BALDWIN THEATRE. 

AL. HAY.VIAN- Lessee and Manager 

ggj" Everything New! Third Week! Continue J Success! Every Evening (in- 
cluding Sunday) and Saturday Matinee. 

BIJOU BURLESQUE COMPANY! 

IN THEIR GREAT SUCCESS, 

ORPHEUS AND EURYDIGE! 

Introducing New Songs, Specialties and Music 



POPULAR PRICES. 



August '2. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Lessee and Manager. Mr. M. B. LEAVITT | Acting .Manager..., .. ..Mr. JAY RIAL 

Genuine, Hearty Fun! Matinee Saturday. 
LEON & CU3HMAN MINSTREL COMEDY COMPANY ! 
The ONLY LEON, MR. FRANK CUSHMAN and a Company of Selected Artists, 
in an Absurd Satire of High and Low Colored City Life, entitled, 
Sara Barnum's Dilemma ! 

And the Laughable Burlesque, Ill-Fed-Dora ! 
Introducing all the Latest Popular Songs and Music. Concluding with the 
Screaming Burlesque on Our National Game, Base Ball! August 2, 

TELEGRAPH HILL OBSERVATORY. 



MOONLIGHT CONCERTS EVERY EVENING! 



Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday Afternoon Concerts! 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

E4l<ly street, near Market.— Kreliu^ Bros., Sole Proprietors 
and Managers.— Positively Lust Nights! Verdi's Grand Tragic Opera, in 
Five Acts, 

17 n Ballo in Maschera ! 

MISS HELENE PItfGEON aa Oscar. Grand Chorus and Orcbrstra. 
Monday Evening, August 4th -FATINITZA. 

Admissir.11, 25 cents. Reserved seats, 50 cent's. July 2(S. 

THE FOUNTAIN THEATRE, 

C Corner Sutter au.l Kearay street*, iioorge Scliuiitt, Pro* 
>* prietor.— A Hit! STANLEY and PIXLEYand the Renowned Grotesque Team, 
HERNE and ROSCOE. 

Monday, August 4th— First Appearance of MAGGIE FOSTF.R, the Rcc gnized 
Vocal Queen, and LYDIA ROSA, tbe Talented Soiig-and-Dance Artist \ 



• 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTISKH 



SPORTING. 



Cricket Tin- I- uitiog match <'*<*i 

--•. :tinl Morion flub* rm playod but Saturday after 
i. tli«* crfokol Known throughout the ni.4t.li wai >-f a higher 

■ d olttba. lin' gama ■ u 

rtfa i 'i lha II «n i-.'u Fropby, fend u lha Ooddanu. bad won two, to 

Hariona, tlir report wu that tin- bitter olttb would 

make a grand effort t" win tin" natch. ESxpaotliu] .. close Kama-, a hirye 

'-r-» assembled at ib< pounda, sad with f;iir punctu 

iJitv play began, Waterman'** nana] luck attended him aod be won the 

j niiiii, bot inataad of going t ■ tin- vJokett bimaalf- :•- aiual, 

-. lending in being ■ 

doubtfulimprovemtut, The brol min opened tin- proc 

Mariana, and did -••• effectually, th« fire! over, each from Watermau 
and Pui-dy yielding IS rant "tf the I'. it. In ttardy'e second over, Ben 
: liit, .-kie.l the ball, which Sanderson had -i Long run 
fur, bat caught, tin- hot wicket filling for l*. spin> came, and add' d 
.■illy two, when Bristowc oaught bim neatly "IT Pordy, two for 21 and 
1 ■> 22, when the tame bowler dup * a ni Barney Benjamin. I reo, 
Theobald and Jacobs made a rood stand, the finuVnajned putting six to* 

. Jacobs batted in g I form for 11. Between them they carried 

the Kore t.. 38, But John Theobald, who followed hits brother] was 
taken beautifully by ("lark before he bad time t" be troublesome. The 
tuth wicket fell foroD, Webater being the only other batsman that made 

■land. The innings closing for 54. Waterman has the 

three wickets for 13 runs, but this in only on 

paper. The majority ">f the 11 byea must be charged to hia erratic cannon 

ch-'tji. Clark only bowled 8 balls, but he got one wicket at the cost of a 

i in, which should have been saved. Cookaon bowled well, netting 
■_' wickoti for 12, and Pordy received 3 for L6. The fielding waa good, all 

tehee offered being taken, and Cookson caught Jacobs, but the Um- 
pire, through a mistake, did DOt allow it. The Occidents began badly, 
Purdy giving a ohance off the first ball, but he atoned for this by good 
bard bitting, sending one out of the ground off Banner in grand style. 

.■■■■, Sanderson and Waterman were easily disposed of, the three 
wicketfl not averaging 1 run apiece. Then (.'lark and Purdy made a stand, 
and the Mure was carried to 24 before Purdy was bowled. Cnrr helped 
the score ->ti bravely, and after him Km>\ did effectual work, making the 
winning hit of the match, amid loud applause from bis companions, 
('lark*;* batting waa the feature of the innings; it was equally safe and 
effectual. Hi- is runs were all made by sterling cricket. Purdy comes 
next wi.li 16, including the brilliant 5. Knox, at a critical stage, played 
in tine form, and be was luudly applauded for a fine hit to leg for 4. The 
innings closed for 71, amidst cheers from the Occident men, who were in 

ipirite at seeing 17 run?, to the good. The Merions fielded well. 
Jacobs secured '_' wickets for 7, Webster 4 for 26, Banner '1 for 1(1, and 
Barney Benjamin 1 for 12. Today a scratch match will be played. 

Pigeon Shooting.— The Gun Club held one of the most successful 
meetings of the season, at Bird's Point, last Saturday. Seventeen mem- 
bers entered for the regular competition for the Club Medals, 12 birds 
I each, Hurlinghi.m rules, the usual handicaps being allowed, Messrs. 
Crandall, Bacon, Bent and Emmett standing at 28 yards. Mr. Butler, 
I the genial, active and efficient Secretary of the Club, won the medal, 
; with a cleau score, and was warmly congratulated upon the success which 
he has so often all but achieved. Messrs. Ewing and Havens each killed 
11 ; both appear to be coming back to their old form. Five members 
made 10 kills each — Messrs. Griffith, Babcock, Wilson, Berry and Orr. 
Mr. <>rant stood alone, with 9 opposite his name. Messrs. (Jordan, 
Bmmett and Fuller killed 8, and so did Mr. Hanson. Messrs. Crandall 
1 and Bacon divided the kills and misses equally, but Mr. Bent let 7 escape. 
Mr. W. Mackintosh, one of the eorlieat members of the Club, was present 
and had a band in the fun, and to the good tune of 12 straight kills. 
Evidently his stay in Portland has not made his hand unsteady or his eye 
■ dim. At San Bruno there was a gathering of the crack shots of the State 
j last Sunday. The match was 40 birdB each, Hurlingham rules, entrance 
s.~ifj, eight subscribers, giving §250. $100 and $50 to the first, second and 
third men. Robinson killed 38, Fay 3<> and Hopper 35, and they got the 
: coin. The other competitors were Bassford, 34. Lambert withdrew when 
I he had killed 28 out of 30, Walsh withdrew when he missed 8 out of 30, 
and B. Brown cried enough when 7 out of 22 escaped bim. 

Rifle Shooting.— The match talked of between Mr. W. Milton Farrow, 
of Newport, Rhode Island, artillery, and the well known crack rifle shot, 
Officer Linville, is off, the parties failing to agree upon the weapon to be 
used. Mr. Farrow has offered to enter a §25 sweepstake with a number 
our best marksmen, and we understand such a match will be shortly ar- 
ranged. Tomorrow Mr. Farrow will take part in the competition at 
Scbotzen Park, Alameda. Mr. Farrow is the inventor of a new military 
and sporting rifle, the model of which we have had an opportunity to ex- 
amine. It has every appearance of being an improvement upon any 
military rifle at present in use. The changes, which are claimed as im- 
provements, are in the breach-block, extractor, hammer and trigger. 
These are made in the simplest style, indicating that the rifle will do swift 
and accurate service. The spring safety latch is also a new feature, and 
appears to work beautifully. The rifle is in four main pieces and can be 
readily taken apart and easily put together— an important consideration 
in cleaning the weapon. Of course the merits of this arm can only be 
known by actual service, which we understand the inventor will soon 
bring about. The same gentleman has made a lubricating shell, which, 
in a 32 caliber rifle, will carry 40 grains of powder and a bullet of 150 
grains. Before using, the bullet is dipped in a lubricating compound, 
which prevents leading the barrel of the rifle, and saves a great deal of 
cleaning when rapid tiring is necessary. 

Yachting.— There is nothing exciting to report in local matters. The 
Halcyon, Lurline, Nellie and Fleur de Lis were out on Sunday. The 
two keel boats had several brushes, and the Lurline generally had the 
best of it. The Halcyon is being properly trimmed, and when Captain 
Bruce gets her in order we are satisfied that she will show a marked im- 
provement upon all her previous performances. The Chispa has just 
come down from Benicia, where she has been on the ways for several 
weeks. AU her insi:le ballast has been taken out, and she now depends 



ddod her lead keel t.. keep her feet, Bba ha* now 0,600 ponnda ootsid*. 

Captain Frank Murph n spending bis vacation at ths *J 

Now that he has rniornsd we sxpeot some changes will bemads In the 

Nellie, to -:< ■( Li iii trim for whatever racing may • (Tei Id ■ >i list way. 

In going to windward this season she baa never vhown hei 

but In running t.> Santa l I mterey Bay, 

and pleased bet many friends, A number ol Santa Crui gentlemen who 

Lohtlng tastes were entertaj I by Captain White, on board the 

KU-iir da Lis, last 8 tturday. 

Trouttng. Mr. P. McSham- is upending hi* u-oial long 6 
Hon Betting at independence Lake, and repoi ta Bne sport, Prossei Creek, 

near Ernclces, la oi f the favorite streams this season. Nutneroo 

ties have already been there, and nil speak highly of the atse aod 
the trout. In the South Yuba, neai Cisco md north fork 
American River, 12 miles from Oieoo, the fishing oontiom 
M in in. w is the bait need, and several anglers Include spoons In thi b 
for these waters. Anglers ran now go to the bead-waters of the Baora 
in. -lit. i by rail. The bridge at Slaty I freak is finished, and. as this point 
is 40 miles above Redding, many^good streams hitherto out oi res 
now available. Black bass continue to afford good sport to anglers who 

visit the Crystal Springs reservoir. Last Sunday B number of genth men 

caught the regulation allowance of 8 fish, the weight varying from i to 3 

pounds each. 

Boy Fishing -Along the shores of Marin county, from Tiburon to 

( 'alifornia I Sity, there has Keen an Improvement in fishing sin, r last 

report The catches last Sunday from the various boats ranging from :i 
tn 1"> pounds each. At Tiburon wharf catches of smelt have been good. 
The large fish of this sp.-rics make good sport, when the angler is content. 

to use light tackle. Silver smelt have also been liken at the same point 

in a satisfactory numbers. Smelt fishing at the Oakland and Alameda 

railroad wharves has been excellent f"r ten days past. Large salmon 
have recently been Feen near Oakland wharf, but the light tackle used 
there allowed them all to get away. The Kdith made her usual Satur- 
day and Sunday trip to Noonday rock and the Farallonea. The sea was 
very rough and only 300 pounds of fish were caught. 

Rowing. —To morrow the Ariel and South -End four-oared crews will 
row a three-mile race in Oakland Creek for 9250 n side. We expect to 
Bee a good race, and incline to put our money on the Ariel crew. Han 
Ian and Beach are to row on the Parramatta river on 20th inst. The 
race between the champion and Lay cock waa a financial failure in regard 
to gate money. Haulan is the lion of the day with our Australian 
cousins. Alfred R. Tuckey may have some knowledge of rowing, but he 
is lamentably ignorant of the rules that hedge about an amateur, lie 
claims to have deposited -^"i0 forfeit to bind a race with Shuppert, That 
action at once puts him beyond the pole of amateur oarsmen. Of course 
we regret his action, for we have scarcely an amateur oarsman in this city 
or out of it. 

"A VALUABLE CALIFORNIA INVENTION." 

Leo D. Craig, of this city, has invented a new and great improvement 
in faucets for water, steam and air, but more especially for basins, bath- 
rooms, garden hose and other household uses, that, for novelty and per- 
fection, far excels anything of the sort we have ever seen. The pressure 
of water, air, etc., tends to press the working parts more closely together, 
instead of separating them, as in those now in use. Thus wear from serv- 
ice, instead of destroying, only makes them more perfectly tight, being 
exactly the reverse of the old style now in general use. Every one knows 
the annoyance of a leaky faucet on the waterpipe around the house, and 
the difficulty of keeping them tight. Therefore, we think this invention, 
which will soon be placed on the market, in many new and beautiful de- 
signs, is worthy the attention of architects, plumbers, builders and house- 
holders, Mr. Craig is an inventor who has placed before the public many 
new and useful contrivances; but we consider this one of the most valua- 
ble of the emanations of his fertile genius. The device can be seen in 
practical operation at his office, No, 310 Montgomery street, where all 
interested are cordially invited to call and examine its working. 



Housekeepers who wish to have a cooking apparatus at hand which 
will enable them to prepare any little delicacy at a moment's notice 
should obtain one of the Monarch Oil Stoves for 1884. It can be seen at 
F. Myers & Co's establishment, No. 869 Market street. Descriptive 
circulars will be sent on application. 

The Placquc Pictures of the Elite Studio have such a poetical effect 
that they are most popular. 



CHARITY PARTY! 

Park Opera House, Alameda Friday Evening'. August 15th 

MUSIC BY A GOOD OBOHESTBA. 

TICKETS, SO OENTS-To ho had at thu Principal PARK-STREET STORES and 
of the following 

COMMITTEE : 



MBS. A. M. HIOKOX, 
MRS. E. A. SCOTT, 
UBS. It. CUTLAR, 

mrs. P. h. Mccormick, 

UBS. II. MICHAELS, 
MliS. C. A. EDSON, 



MRS. E. P. ROWE. 
MARCH AT 8:30 P. 



MRS. KINO, 

MRS. P. MARRIOTT, Ja., 
MRS. DR. REYNOLDS, 
MBS. H. W. A. NAIIL, 
MRS. 0. A. LUNT, 
MRS. C. S. PECK, 



August 2. 



THE BANK OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA 

HAS REMOVED 

— TO — 

312 PINE STREET. 



[Auifusl 2.] 



W. LAWSON, 1 
C. E. TAYLOR, i 



Agents. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER \ND 



Aug. 2, 1884. 



SCIENTIFIC AND USEFUL. 

To Clean Marble.— A person who has tried many ways for accom- 
plishing the above nhject thinks the following plan, which he came across 
in some newspaper, quite the best: Brash the dust off with a piece of 
chamois, then apply with a brush a good coat of gum arabic, about the 
consistency of thkk mucilage ; expose it to the sun or wind to dry. In a 
short time it will peel off ; wash it with clean water and a clean cloth. 
If the tirst application does not have the desired effect, it should be tried 
again. Another method is to rub the marble with tht following solution: 
One quarter of a pound (if soft so:ip, one quarter of a pound of whiting, 
and one ounce of soda and a piece of stone blue the size of a walnut ; rub 
it over the. marble with a piece of H uiuel, and leave it on for twenty-four 
hours; then wash it off witli clean waler, and polish the marble with a 
piece of flannel or an old piece of felt, or take twi> parts of common soda, 
one part of pumice stone, and one part of finely powdered chalk, sift it 
through a tine sieve, and mix it with water, then rub i f well over the mar- 
ble, then wash the marble over with soap and water. To take stains out 
of white marble, take one ounce of ox-gall, one gill of lye, one and a half 
table spoonfuls of turpentine ; mix and make into a paste with pipe clay; 
put on the paste over the stain, and let it remain for several days. To 
remove oil stains apply common clay saturated with benzine. If the 
grease has remained in long, the polish will be injured ; but the stain will 
be removed. Iron mould or ink spots may be taken out in the following 
manner: Take half an ounce of butter of antimony, and one once of ox- 
alic acid, and dissolve them in a pint of rain-water ; add enough flour to 
bring the mixture to a proper consistency. Lay it evenly on the stained 
part with a brush, and, after it has remained for a few days, wash it off, 
and repeat the process, if the stain be not wholly removed. 

— Scientific American. 

A profitable use has at last been found for the empty and discarded 
tin can. Thousands of those cans are now gathered in Philadelphia ev- 
every week, and are used to decorate or cover traveling-trunks. A num- 
ber of factories for the conversion of old buffeted and battered cans and 
other tin refuse from the ashheaps have sprung up on the outskirts of that 
city, and the new business is said to be a growing one. The cans are col- 
lected in various ways, but principally from the city ash-heaps and the 
hotels and large boarding-houses. At the factory the soldered seams are 
subjected to an intense heat in such a way that the solder is allowed to 
run into a receptacle, and is carefully saved and sold, the profit from this 
source alone almost paying for the expense of the gathering and handling 
of the cans. The tops and bottoms of the cans are melted and turned 
into window-sash weights. The labels on the tinplates are easily taken 
off, after they have been thoroughly soaked in water, and the plates them- 
selves rolled out flat by machinery. As the inside of the plates are not 
much discolored by the contents of the can, they present a clean surface, 
and are stated to make excellent covers for trunks, the seams being hid- 
den by the trunk-braces, either of wood or sheet-iron. Other uses are al- 
so made of the tinplates, and there is said to be considerable profit in the 
business. Moreover, very little capital is required in the new industry. 
One Philadelphia factory rolled out 40,000 of these plates in less than two 
months, and the industry promises to be largely developed. 

— British Trade Journal. 

Tobacco and Eyesight.— For many years it has been known to oph- 
thalmic surgeons that abuse of tobacco may lead to failure of sight. This 
fact has been made use of by the anti-tobacconists, who are mostly well- 
meaning but meddlesome persons, allied more or less to other agitators in 
the cause of various reactionary measures for the impediment of scientific 
research, and the instruction of sanitary legislation. In the report of 
forty cases of tobacco amblyopia, by Mr. Shears, of Liverpool, which we 
have recently published, it appeared that atrophy of the optic nerves is 
very rarely met with as the result of excessive smoking, although tobacco 
is the essential agent in producing failure of sight. Great moderation in 
smoking, and especially the employment of mild forms of tobacco, is all 
that is necessary to ensure recovery. Mr. Hutchinson has found that a 
very small proportion of smokers suffer from amblyopia, and that among 
those who do become subject to impaired vision are many who show an 
hereditary tendency to that infirmity ; many of their relatives, who do 
not smoke, being similarly afflicted. Workmen in tobacco- factories do 
not appear to be subject to deterioration of eyesight ; in one large manu- 
factory, where over twelve thousand men and women are employed, Mr. 
Shears has found that not one single person on the premises suffered from 
failure of eyesight, although many of the hands had been working there 
for ten years. — British Medical Journal. 

Boiled Lettuces. — The lettuce is a neglected vegetable, although it 
constitutes a promiuent ingredient in every good salad. At one time the 
lettuce was supposed to possess soporific properties, but of late years it 
has, perhaps too hastily, been disestablished as a drug in the repertory of 
the therapeutist. Some are now strongly insisting that lettuces should 
be used more generally as food, and suggesting t^hat they ought to be boil- 
ed, after which treatment tliey are said to be as palatable as spinicb. If 
this be the fact, it is worth knowing, as spinach is necessarily excluded 
from the diet of the oxaluric patient, and it is precisely in this class of 
cases the soothing properties of the lettuce, if it have any, would be val- 
uable. — Public Opinion. 

Seldlitz powders and blue pills are now considered requisite in the 
outfit of ocean voyagers, bromide of sodium having been almost discarded 
as a remedy for sea sickness. The rich foods, nuts and pastry of a steam- 
ship's bill of fare are tempting to the sharpened appetite of the voyager, 
they over-eat, and the pitching of the vessel completes the round. But 
it is asserted that Neptune can be cheated of his tribute if the intending 
ocean passenger will begin to fortify himself or herself a week in advance 
with a five-grain blue pill every other night alternating with seidlitz 
powders. — Nautical Gazette. 

The habit of living in fiats is advancing in London by leaps and 
bounds. Two sets are now projected on the Embankment at a fabulous 
cost. One will rise over the ruins of the National Opera House ; the 
other will adjoin the New National Liberal Club. In this latter, the 
lowest rent for a suite of rooms is £250 a year, and a nobleman has taken 
on lease a suite on the ground floor at an annual rent of £1,250. This of 
course includes rates and taxes. But it sounds big for what is practically 
unfurnished apartments. 



HORRIBLE ! 

Professor Common Sense Sheds Light on the Baking Powder 
Subject.— To the Price Baking Powder Co.: In compliance with your in- 
structions, I have bought and chemically tested some potatoes and tur- 
nips. I have nowanaljzed most of the articles used by man for food, 
and find them to contain the chemical elements of the soil in which they 
grow, and it is my opinion that corn, flour, potatoes, turnips, cabbage 
and, in short, all the cereals and vegetables are unfit for use. 

In find that to grow these articles profitably the greedy, unscrupulous 
farmer mixes with the soil guano, stable manure, dead fish and the con- 
tents of privy vaults, and to think of using for food anything produced 
from these filthy things is too utterly disgusting to be entertained. I find 
also that the common air we breathe, and all water, meat and milk con- 
tain ammonia, and yield to the system more thereof than any baking 
powder biscuit; and I have therefore prohibited the use of air, meat, 
milk, water, and all the vegetables and cereals, in my family. 

Thanking you for fee inclosed in your order (-S100), I am truly yours. 
C. Sense, M.D., Prof, of Chemistry. 



The Accommodation of the Eye. — According to physiological optics, 
the power of adjustment consists in the ciliary muscle and the crystalline 
lense. Prof. Donders established the fact that the human emmetropic 
eye is at its prime at the tenth year, attributing 14 dioptrics of additional 
accommodation at that period, and after that a gradual diminution, owing 
to the contraction of the cili:iry muscle and the hardening of the crystal- 
line lense, thereby loosing its elasticity. It presents the question : Why 
is it that our eyes should begin to deteriorate so much earlier in life than 
the rest of our body, especially when we keep on developing up to middle 
age ? and whether or not at what time of life spectacles should be had re- 
course to depends entirely upon the formation of the eye, and had better 
be determined by a competent oculist-optician. The ratio of deterioration 
reduces the amount of accommodation from 14 dioptrics at the age of 10 
years, to 7 dioptrics at 30 years of age, and 1 dioptric at 55 years. 

C. Mulleb, Optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush. 

Builders and others who require anything in the way of Doors, Win- 
dows, Blinds, Weights, Pulleys and Cord, etc., etc., will find that they 
can get thorough satisfaction at the establishment of Messrs. E. H. Kit- 
tredge & Co., Nos. 113 and 115 Market street. This firm is very exten- 
sively engaged in the handling and manufacture of material of this de- 
scription, and its facilities for supplying its patrons with first-class arti- 
cles at a reasonable cost could not be excelled. Those who deal with 
Messrs. Kittredge & Co. can rely upon being dealt with in a straigbfor- 
ward and business-like way, and getting goods which are exactly as repre- 
sented. 

Discovery. — We went out to dinner, the other night, and tasted some 
most delicious soup. I perpetrated a fearful piece of rudeness, and asked 
our hostess for the recipe. Would you believe it, she told me it was 
made from Liebig's extract?— of course made up with vegetables. I have 
been obliged to give up soups this weather, I find it so difficult to keep 
the stock ; but now that I know how to make stock each day from 
Liebig, I shall surprise Tom with an amount of new soups. The fl ivor 
is excellent, and one would imagine that it was the most expensive stock 
— not humble, inexpensive Liebig. — Lady * * * * in "Life." 

Italian Pastes are edibles of the choicest kind, and constitute a most 
agreeable addition to the attractions of any well-appointed table, when 
they are good. Housekeepers, dealers and others, who wish to get some- 
thing really delicious of this kind, are invited to try the Maccaroni, Fari- 
na, Vermicelli, etc., manufactured by Messrs. C. R. Spivola & Co., No. 
415 Battery street, southwest corner of Merchant street. These Pastes 
are admitted to be of the lightest and most delicate kind, and when once 
tried thej 7 are sure to become favorites. 

A Horse's Age. — The horse's age is to be judged by the following signs: 
After a horse is 9 years old, a wrinkle comes over the eyelid, at the upper 
corner of the lower lid, and every year thereafter he has one well defined 
wrinkle for each year over nine, If, for instance, a horse has three wrin- 
kles he is 12. Add the number of wrinkles to 9, and you will always get 
his age; so said an old turfite to me. 

The Edwins as Actors. — Our best actor3 were and are named Edwin: 
Edwin Booth, Edwin Adams, Elwin Davenport. Edwin Tilton, E iwin 
Thome, and, greatest of them all, was Edwin Forrest. 

Poison Oak.— A positive preventive and cure is found only in 
Dickey's Famous Creme de Lis. It also removes Tan, Sunburn and 
Freckles. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Limited), of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

CAPITAL SXTBSCBIBED $10,000,000 

Capital paid up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to capital) J ,873,000 

Total Assets June SO, 1SS3 B, 833,712 

■W1I. GREEK HAKRISO.V, Manager, 

[July 1!).] 308 Pine street, San Francisco. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HAMBTJRa. 

Capital 91,500,000.00 I Assets Jan. 1, 1884.81,088,015.63 

Surplus 227.38J.SI0 I Invested iii tin r. s. 494,234.28 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 

332 California street, San Francisco Cat., 

General Agents for the United States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital $5, O0O a 0O0. —Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A- Co., No, 
/ 3L6 California street, San FranciBCO. Nov. 18. 









CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



PASSING REMARKS. 
A trip in • oat b r, a t* m l ,v- lk -,», Hllml ma with sorrow, 

hail an irritating effect on onr traveling temper. W« 
an* Impatient when forced t" *it in bone-care. The ilo* poos "f their 

: iqjJ derailment, the obex- 

ere, the Incivility ..f the employee* In 

and ili.-ir dirty and i , are ail causes of exasperation. The ex 

■ >rt [i t-i be found in a bobtaU, The Aiu.-i lo m 

pnbUo are proverbially alow t-> anger; but ""-Tin- day they will rise in 

rfathteooa wrath and make chip* of tbi ttonable vehicle. I don't 

know who it was who invented th- bobl «il. bnl I rinoerely troat he i« 

in Hadea, He waa probably .» man who had a spite against the 

entire human race, and became inventively vindictive. 

• • • • • 

On a rainy day the bobtail [a particularly incarnating. The driver, 
wh.> by hi- mulUfariunH datiea had been from wild despair t<> resigned in- 
differenoa, rai trouble to atop the ou on a crossing, and so 

yon have to plunge after it, into the mud and slush, with which, thanks 
to our charming aybtem ol atreel management) nor tboronghfarea are 
adorned- Mad and In oath-loan, splashed from head to foot, you land on 
the hark itep just as the driver, who has ; it length made up hin mind to 
atop, pota the brake hard down and pnlla up the car with a jerk that pre- 
cipitates you among the other passengers .is if shot onl of a catapult. If 
an athlete, you ma; perhaps, by some tour de force, be saved the 
: v of a general langfa at your expense. Just as you have steadied 
If, the brake if* let loose with a whirl, and another jerk sets you 
again in involuntary motion, to the danger of every pair of feet in the 
oar. Barely escaping tumbling into the tap of some elderly woman, with 
■ wet waterproof and a dripping cotton umbrella of immense proportions, 
your erratic career is ended by a carom, in which you count on the greasy 
female with a huiie basket and a dirty nosed brat, and on the muddy- 
broeaned laborer, and which deposits you in some unoccupied space on one 
of the seals. ( ionfronting your fellow passengers, who uaze stonily at you 
while they are wiping or whisking off the humid traces of your own um- 
brella's mad gyrations, you are brought to a realization of the most pro- 
Donnoed disfavor with which you are regarded. 

• * • * * 

Now comes the acrobatic feat of depositing your fare in the contribu- 
tion box, by the use of which the corporation save the wages of a con- 
ductor, hut make themselves accessories before the fact to an immense 
amount of consequent profanity. If you tind you have the requisite 
nickle you ask your neighbor in the blandest mauner to pass it up, and 
with much satisfaction congratulate yourself on your escape from 
further trouble. If, on the contrary, you discover that you have lo get a 
larger coin changed, then gather up your nerve and your audacity. You 
will neeil them. There is, as everybody knows, a little metal sliding 
panel in the door, just behind the driver. You rise to approach this 
blanked-dashed aperture. Just as you get to your feet the car goes 
swiftly round a sharp curve, propelling you head foremost into your vis- 
a-vis. You recover yourself with a mighty effort, apologize as gracefally 
as possible under the circumstances, and stagger and lurch in a manner 
inevitably suggestive of inebriety to the front door. Steadying yourself 
by a creditable muscular effort of your left arm, you endeavor to at- 
tract the driver's attention. That much-harassed functionary is at the 
moment, and for many to come, occupied in the exchange of pretty com- 
pliments and delicate repartee with a truckman, who persists in keeping 
his vehicle on the track just in front of the car, and also in attempting to 
dislodge a small boy who is stealing a ride on the back step. So he takes 
no notice of you for several minutes, during which time you are patiently 
waiting, hanging to a strap. Presently the obnoxious dray in front turns 
out of the track, its driver having, in his opinion, caused sufficient aggra- 
vation, and the car springs forward suddenly in consequence of a vicious 
application of whip to the Rosinante harnessed to it. You come within 
an ace of being pitched head foremost through the glass door, and at this 
moment the Jehu turns around and snatches your proffered coin. By a 
dexterous use of thumb, finger and teeth he makes change and hands it 
to you. You regret that you are not wearing gloves, and handle the mix- 
ture of coins and tickets gingerly. You deposit the required nickle in 
the box, and, flushed with success, you turn around with the object of 
regaining your seat. But alas! During your little diversion it has been 
taken, and its occupant is positively bursting with apparent unconscious- 
ness. There you are, and there you remain till your destination is 
reached. A " bobtail " is verily a villainous institution. 

• * » * # 

At the California Theater, during the present opera season, enthusiasm 
is playing the devil with things in general. It has opened prison doors 
and freed prisoners, and has, subsequently, reincarcerated them. It has 
caused hated rivals to assume fighting attitudes without the complement 
of weapons. It has resuscitated the dead. It has brought smiles to faces 
ostensibly furrowed with care, frowning with anger and distorted with 
despair. It has mixed periods thousands of years apart. It has 
brought a Pharaoh in converse with a dress-coated fiddler. In fact it has 
done all sorts of wonderful things. I allude to the encores which, to the 
number of a dozen or more, have marked each and every performance of 
the Sieni troupe. The illusion of the stage has, in every instance, been 
totally destroyed. 

* * * * * 

The usual " mud-slinging " of a Presidential campaign bids fair to reach, 
this year, an extreme of nastiness. The attacks on the moral character 
of Cleveland open a new field, and a very disgusting one at that. It is 
fair to presume that the direct charges are mere campaign lies, and will 
so be proven to be. The arguments used in support of these charges and 
the deductions made from them indicate that the moral hypocrisy which 
is such a prominent trait of American social life is being developed in a 
political way. Tc satisfy the fanatics who are bolstering up these absurd 
charges, it would be necessary to select a candidate from among the at- 
tendants in a Turkish harem. 

***** 

During the early part of the week a rumor was current that Haverly'e 
Minstrels had suddenly arrived. It was a false impression, derived from 
the appearance of the Democratic County Committee in Monday even- 
ings procession. 

Clairbeau. 



INSURANCE. 



HUTCHINSON k MANN, 

„ INSURANCE AGENCY. 

Now. 323 ninl 321 ruliloritiii nlr«et, Nmi IrniirUco, < ul. 



LGRIC1 i.'li RAL.... 

VLLKMANNIA 

BOATMAN'S 

CITIZENS' 

PARBAQUT 

KIUKMAN'S , 

OERM \N.. 



Fire Insurance. 



IKVINfl ..f Now York 

MECHANICS' of \. « Vork 

METROPOLITAN PLATE GLASS ol n >, 
M u ORLEANS l\> U3SO0I ITION 

rilNNS\ LVANIA mi i , 

PI OPLI > ol iv 

Bl I'M I ... 

ll I TONIA of Now Orleans 



ol New York 
,o! Pittsburgh 
, p Uaburgb 
...ol SI 

Of N. 
,..ol |; , 
. of 1'ill-lmr^li 

UIRAKU .ol Phllatli Iphls 

LONDON AM> NORTH WK.STLKN of Manchoater. 
Marine Insurance. 

LONDON AND PROVINCIAL MA KINK INSURANCE CO f Loml-m 

LA FONCIERE M \i;im; INSURANCE COMPANY ol Parle 

Capital Represented $27,000,000. 

jiff Losses Equitably Adjusted and Promptly l'atd. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 
THE FIRE INSURANCE ASSOCIATION OF LONDON, 

*20 mill 322 «'ulll.ir.ilji Mtreet, Sun Krnm llSWO, < ..I 

HUTCHINSON & MANN Managen j W. L. CHALMERS- Spodal and Adjuster 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY, OF CALIFORNIA. 

Organized 1864. 
Principal Office 216 Snnsoino street. 

FIRE ivsi'ii.lMi;. 

Capital Paid Up in TJ. S. Gold Coin) $300,000 00 

Reinsurance Reserve $200,059 75 

As/cts January 1, 1831 $7.19,475.13 I Premiums, sinccorynniKat'n. $4, M1.VJ7. ,7 

Surplus for policy holders — S752,0!W.73 Losses, since organisation.. Sl.W-i.Ults.-ju 
Net Surplus (over everytblng).$3S3,08S.98 I 

OFFICERS : 

J. P. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD Vice-President | R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of tiik Homk Mutual Is*ukanck Co.— h. h. Maker, H. L. Dodge, J. 
L. X. Shepard, JohnCurrcv.J. K. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Watcrln.iise, (/li;uiiiccv 
Taylor, 8. Hug, J. 3. Carter, H. P. Coo n. April 12. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 416 CALIFORNIA STREET. 

(CALIFORNIA LLOYDS.) 

Capital 8730.000 I Assets Over 81,000,000 

The Leading Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of California. 

JAS. D. BAILEY Secretary I OUSTAVE TOUCHARD President 

C. P. FARNFIELD General Agent J N. G. KITTLE Vice-President 

GEO. T. BOllEN, Surveyor. 

SOUTH BRITISH AND NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INS. CO. 

Capital, $20,000,000- 
Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Capital, 810, 000,000- 

THE STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

Of Liverpool- Capital, $5,000,000 
W I. CALjLINGHAIH * CO., Heiicral Agents, 
Aug. 12 213-215 Sansomc Streot 

A JOINT POLICY ISSUED BY THE FOUR COMPANIES. 

Imperial Fire Insurance Co , of London — • Instituted 1803. 

London Assurance Corporation, of London 

Established by Royal Charter 1720. 

Northern Assurance Corporation, of London.. ..Established 1836. 
Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool Established 1857. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 
S.E. Cor. California and Montgomery Sts., Safe Deposit Building:. 

PHCENIX ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of London, England, Estab'd 1782. —Cash Assets, $5,266,372.36 

BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto, Canada, Estab'd 1833.— Cash Assets, $1,343,908.54 

WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Toronto. Canada, Estab'd 1851. -Cash Assets, $1,357,326.39 

BUTL.EB A If ALDAN, 

General Agreuts for Pacific Coast, 

413 California Street San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, of Zurich, Capital 5,000,000 franc**; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloiee, of Basle, Capital 6,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally fur all losses that may be sus- 
ained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claimB under an English policy, these Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HA RKY W. SYZ, Agent, 420 and 422 California St . , S, F. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $7,500,000 

£& Assets 1.7O0.QV6 

Cash Assets in United States 775 ,003 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE A CO., General Agent*. 

March 20. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



An- 



1884. 



REAL PUBLIC BENEFACTORS. 

Universal history teaches this fact, that intellect, force of character 
and business capacity rule and govern Bociety. These three agencies are 
Hi-' pillars upon which government is founded, and without them all 
would lie anarchy. Whether in pence or war the law of force is the 
dominating law. The question is shall it be used for beneficent or de- 
>ti uetive purposes? The results of its operations are visible to all. every 
• ■i no nnnity is nnder the sway of force, and as an illustration we take San 
IV mciscn. Men of intellect, resolute natures, and great business ability, 
wi re the founders of the city, and its progress and prosperity are due to 
intellectual supremacy and indomitable energy of that class of men who 
are endowed by nature with that strange energy called force. Were there 
nut men who towered above their fellow creatures, who inaugurated great 
enterprises and carried them through to a successful consummation, the 
masses of the people would be doomed to poverty and degradation. Public 
spirited aud enterprising citizens, men who create work for the people 
and put bread into their mouths, are the real benefactors of the race. 
U ithout citizens of this kind there would be no art, scientific progress 
or ^'reat industrial establishments; there would be no railroads, steam- 
boats, telegraphs, telephones or other modes of travel ami communication, 
which link mankind more closely together, and, at the same time, open 
no avenues of labor, from which the thousands draw the necessaries of 
lif-. The creative power aud working capacity of some men is aston- 
isl ing, and if we calmly look at those in our midst who are the control- 
ling spirits in our great railroad system, our telegraphic enterprises, our 
hanking institutions, and commerce, we cannot hut admire their iudustry, 
tti -ir modesty and even their benevolence. We hold that every employer 
of hibor, who gives good wages for good work, is a benevolent man and 
merits the respect of bis fellow citizens and the especial regard of the 
employes. The News Lettek has ever been friendly to the laboring 
cl.tsses, but it has never bowed to them and never flinched from telling 
them the truth, even where it was considered dangerous to do so. This 
journal has, at the same time, ever been on the side of capital, of in- 
tellect and of public and private enterprises, because without these 
things there would be a relapse to barbarism; in other words, to human 
degradation. It has sought to keep alive a kindly feeling between the 
employer and the employed, between labor and capital, knowing that 
they are mutually independent, one upon another. Moving in unity 
they advance civilization, and this means the increased prosperity and 
li.i piness of all. The political demagogues and socialistic cranks who 
attempt to engender bad feeling between labor and capital are the worst 
.- .niies of the laboring classes. Such d-magogues and cranks have but 
tittle sway in California. Their brief career in this city is over, and 
intelligent working men, artisans and mechanics have, fortunately, seen 
into the base motives which actuated the anarchists. This past, it is 
p'easant to contemplate the present srood understanding and friendly re- 
Ijdiuns which exist between the employer and the employed. The latter 
have learned to respect the men who create work for them, and this re- 
s ect is reciprocated by increased desire for their welfare and happiness. 



WE TUNE OUR INSTRUMENT. 

The devil is not so wise because he is the devil as because be is old — 
si j .-. the Spaniard. You cannot put an old bead on young shoulders — 
s;.vs the Briton. Now that the nominations for public office draw near, 
i' i- in order to point out that lads should be shown to the back seats. 
T.'-re are only two prophecies in politics that can be made with safety, 
gamely: Whatever else betide, a ring in the Supervisors aud a ring in the 
School Board can be counted on. The Mayor is a figure head, more or 
1. -> ridiculous considered as an official, with substantial power for mis- 
chief if be is a rogue, with none fur good if he is an honest man. The 
condition of the streets cannot be otherwise than disgraceful under our 
ridiculous system. No Superintendent, however capable and zealous, 
dhs power to mend them, so no Superintendent misdirects his energies to 
any other than his private ends. The Assessorship is a place with oppor- 
tunities; we have not observed that wise As^e--sors worry the poor much, 
while the rich possess the weapon of self-defense. The Auditor is an ac- 
i-<<iintunt, and the Treasurer a cashier who gives sufficient bonds. The 
* '.unity (Jlerkand Recorder are at their worst, gnats that it is not much worth 
n r while to strain out, so long as we gulp down such camels of fraud as 
the Supervisor aud School rings. It will be comic presently to hearken 
to dear granny bulletin croaking her primeval croak on the need of nomi- 
nating good men for Supervisors, and of taking pledges from them. We 
think we see granny already poking that blessed nose of hers, borny with 
age, above the scum of the political pool and swelling her baggy throat to 
emit the same " Brekekex coax"— old as Aristophanes. Here it comes— 
" Boo-uo-ur-nk ! Nominate good men for Supervisors. Make 'em give 
pledges. Co-ax!" And so the farce goes on — year in, year out — decade 
in, decade out — a sort of ghastly pantomime. Clown, with a death's- 
head face, tumbles into the ring with his ominous "Here we are again ! " 

in! our prophetic soul premonishes the rest. New detachments from the 
same old gang of AH Baba's cave, are upon us, with the same still ser- 
vi*L able strategy of fraudulent contracts and collusive franchises. The 
Mayor sits aloft and grins in impotent respectability. The Bulletin pre- 
p res to withdraw its nose again with another " Boo-ur r-ruk ! Who 
would have thought it! Coax!' 1 aud down pops the nose. And San 
Francisco? Well, San Francisco gets, like the great, helpless lunk-head 
; liat she is, no more than she deserves. 



As the "News Letter" has already announced that money will con- 
stitute a large element in promoting the success of the display which Cal- 
ifornia intends making at the New Orleans Fair, the present indications 
are that all that is necessary will readily be obtained. Col. Andrews, the 
Commissioner, recently mentioned in the presence of Mr. Jno. Ballard, ;i 
prominent mining man, that if one hundred gentlemen would put up $100 
each, the whole financial question would be settled. Mr. Ballard promptly 
put up his $100, so that there are only ninety-nine required now. Mr. 
John W. Mackay has also promised liberal assistance to the scheme, aud 
now let the balance of the procession step up and record their names. 



Mr. George Augustus Sala is about to '•article" on Punch. He 
will tell the story of the parentage, birth, growth, education and the 
making of the London witty one. 



TO THE BRITISH INVESTOR AGAIN. 

We mean to lie thorough, and to leave neither grain nor at 
excu-e lor any British investor to be done out of Ids money through the 
California Redwood Company. We repe.it. here what we said List week : 
That Company has not title to the lauds that it pretends to sell, nor 
has it any longer a ghost, of a chance to acquire title. But we have 
now to call attention to other point- that distinguish this scheme from a 
proper business enterprise aud classify it in the Ions li^t of wretched 
projects which are wound up weekly in Loud in, and which all b 
same monotonous tale to tell of extravagant ami waste and misappro- 
priation of funds. For everything that tins California K -I ■■ iod Company 
has validly acquired in Humboldt county, it has paid three prices : its 
business is losing money everyday it runs on Humboldt Bay and Trin- 
idad; its Superintendent. Evans, wastes money with both bands, and is 
utterly impractical as a man 

British investors ought to be able bo understand so plain a piece of 
legislation as that under color and in fraud of which it is attempted to 
grab these lauds. Tne expressed intent of the law is that the timber lands 
shall be acquired by separate individual settlers for their own behoof, and 
to secure this end each settler is required to take an iron clad oath <>i his 
intention to use the land as directed by the statute, and the Register of 
the Land OmVe is required to see that the intent of the law is not evaded, 
Now, it might happen that a Register should be deceived by one or two 
or half a dozen persons appearing before him on separate days, each 
swearing that he made his entry for his own use. If such persons should 
afterwards sell their rights to a single individual, a very small fraud on 
the law would be effected. Bat C. F. Roberts, the Register of the Hum- 
h hit Land Om'ce, allowed from twenty to eighty men daily to come be- 
fore him in line and take the iron-clad oath. Mr. Roberta will not pre- 
tend he did not know those men were perjuring themselves, for Mr. 
R kberte does not pretend that bis faculties are enfeebled or intellect 
clouded. He may plead not guilty, which i» a very different thing. The 
plain truth is that Mr. Register Roberts, instead of d< log his official duty, 
facilitated, so far as lay in his official conduct, the development of this 
fraud upon the Government aud the law. 

Surely, with facts such as these before them. British investors will not 
allow themselves to be done out of their money. It cannot be that they 
will be willing to embark funds in an enterprise promot 
three of whom are uuder indictment by a Unit* rand Jury for 

their part in the very fraud on which 9. The 

scheme is a reckless one in every other n apect. Money is being wasted, 
thrown away, not only through bad judgmenl in pay- 

ing double and treble values on purchases. Next week and the week 
after we shall have more to say, and thus early bespeak the atten i 
District Attorney HUborn, of Register Roberta, of the three gentlemen 
already uuder indictmeut, aud of the three who are not, to the remarks 
we may feel called upon to uffer. 



LET US EDUCATE. 

The advantage of a liberal education iu practical life is the ready re- 
source it places at a youths command in case of emergency, Plutarch 
f nforces this view when he points out that the generous young Roman 
boding himself in a difficult positi.m would shape his course by answer- 
ing the question: What would Epaminondaa or Alexander or (J. Curtius 
have done under these circumstances? The need and the use of similar 
training in our own day i- 1 not less than in that of Plutarch, with this 
advantage to help out our young contemporary — that be ba^ a 
greater number of examples to draw upon. You are crossing Market 
street for example. Four street cars bear down on you on both hands, 
three trucks converge upon you, a back, a coupe and twi 
tersect at the same point. Now .-top and think — Tibet I 
:Sir Francia Drake and B^nj imin Franklin: Exactly what course would 
each of these distinguished men have Uiken at thi- juncture? There is no 
time to deliberate, for if you have not got farther than Drake when the 
truck goes over you, you can work out the rest of the problem on your 
way to the hospital. Or, again, you are in a railway collision ; the cara 
are a good deal piled up and you have reason to believe that a conf] 
tion is getting under way in some part of the mass. Recall I i 
mind aU that you kno.v about Hubert Stephenson, James Watt and the 
Duke of Wellington. You will soon be able to make up your mi; 
what you had best do. Or suppose the baby sv 

What would Cornelia have done were the young Tiberius strangling be- 
fore her? What, Zenobia? What. Maria Theresa . Or ; ■ ir broker sus 
pende payment, having just redized on ■ itie*; what shall you 

do? Recall Richelieu, Warren Hastings and Count Cavour, and 
you are ! Or wheat sells at 1 36J per cental, and you are sure to 
money by getting either long or short of it. Which shall it be > Run 
your eye down the course of history from the episode of Pharaoh's kin- 
to that of Jim Keene's Chicago corner, ami presently you are a made 
man. There can be no doubt about it: in or ler to get on in this world 
what is wanted lirst, last and all the time is a good liberal education, a 
thorough knowledge of the Latin grammar, and a fair acquaintance with 
humane letters. 

A WORD WITH DISTRICT ATTORNEY HILBORN. 
In connection with the California Redwood Company fraud, the U. 
S. District Attorney claims our attention. The active participants iu 
carrying on the attempted laud grab have been J. D. Walker, promoter; 
David Evans, the superintendent; Beach, King, Marks ai 
Three of these, namely : Evans, Marks (bis brother-in-law) and Beach, 
were indicted six months ago for aubornation of perjury in connection 
with these land entries. These persons were defended by A. P. A an 
Duxer (ex D puty U. S. District Attorney) aud brother-in-law to the 
above C. H. King. Mr. Van Duzer has boasted that his clients will 
never be brought to trial. The News Letter will see about that. It 
cannot bring thuse, persons to trial, but it can make any U. S. District 
Attorney who neglects bis duty feel sorry and sick. If the prosecution 
in this case is conducted with vigor, it may get very cli >r all of 

the three men not yet indicted, as complices of the thr We 

will return to this matter another time. The prosecution will be fol- 
lowed up. 



Au..-. 3 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



TOWN CRIER. 



■' llMt th# Oriar Wb*( the -IptiI art ihno ? 

"On«th»t will iiUy th» tlwil. «ir with »oa.' 
" Hf t a itUfl in htl UH u long *■ • llati. 
Which mad* him itrow bolder and bolder." 



Letter of Acceptance. II tvli I red the Procidentia] Domi 

Dalian by the National Conveuti Vmerloan Pie Biters, the Po 

i with submits his totter of accei 

rod i 

iog the o inati»n tendered by your li >a 

■i'"l hangry body, permit the remark that the T. C. i^ m ion obliged, and 

i remises, when tl ocasi (fere, to net up the drinks. ll<- feels a deep 

libltity which ast ap in him, and t 

t-> accompany this acceptanoe with a few words upon the questions in- 
volved in the forthcoming oont 

er to study olo uml uf which may &ff 10I our future 

■favorably, as the case may be. 

Thi r.vuirr Quest ton. Thisi ipon which few (it may be 

mill devilish few) of our public men have ever descanted intelligently, 

w ■ bavf the word of no lees distia ui I mi man than Gen. W. S. 

ll.im-.Tk that the tariflF question is merely one of looal interest, And with 

this opini lost of as are incline i to agree. Being a local question, it 

the Pie-Biters of the I aited States. The Census of 

1850 dincloses the facl that, durin 50 years of our national ex- 

100,000 pi ■. ire consumed by the American people. These 

a represent the fruit of the digestive labors of the nation^ hungry 

men previous to the Pall of '49 or Spring of '60. At the end of the next 

thirty ■■ si consumption of pies, as disclosed by the Cei 

■ is 170,000,000 ■ iner-M*..- in thirty years of nu.nuu.iiilii,- 
\'.l this in the face of the fact that a large number of able-bodied 

Pie-Biters were disabled iu a bloody war; 140,000,000,000 of pies have 
thus been s Ided to the edible wealth of the nation. This is entirely due 
ilicy of protection inaugurated by the gourmands of 1850, and 
perpetuated and practiced by the Pie-Biters 1 party ever since. We de- 
mand protection from the pauper piea of Europe ami Asia. To this end 
. v on foreign pies Bhould be immense, We ought not t«> mince 

Ol it FoBHIGN COMMERCB.— This does oot amount to much, and is really 
a subject "J" very little interest to Pie Biters, It. is certain that we do not 
want any piea imported; as for exporting th un, we are undoubtedly able 
to rem aait y of any such acl I in, 

'I'm: American Hog. -This noble animal, we believe, should be fully 
protected against the invidious thrusts of Bismarck aud Kaiser William. 
The hog fairly bristles with good points. As a savory dish he is un- 
excelled even by Bauer kraut. As a grunter he knocks the Bpots off 
John Bull, or any other bull. We demaud that the hog shall be given 

■ to root or die. 

THE CHINESE QUESTION always has been, and probably always will 
he, " Whaf for!" Nothing that we can say will throw any further light 
upon the subject. 

The New Jersey MOSQUITO.— The Government should take vigorous 
measures fur the suppression of this abominable pest. Millions of swol- 
len noses and pimpled bodies cry aloud to Uncle Sam to interpose the 
Strong arm of the law against the importation of assisted mosquitos. 
We demand that diplomatic relations with Now Jersey shall cease, to 
the end that the mosquito shall be boycotted. 

OUB FOREIGN POLICY. — Our foreign relations are (so far as we know) all 
well. Grandpa John Bull has an occasional attack of rheumatism, but is 
still able to thrash most any of the boys who become obstreperous. Un- 
cle Spain and Count Italy are both in the enjoyment of tolerable health. 
The former has lost none of his trading shrewdness. He offers to sell us 
Cuba for $500,000,000, and we will probably be foolish enough to pay the 
price. Such a course will be cheaper than to whip the old man out of it. 
t lur foreign policy is, we believe, perfectly safe. We have paid the pre- 
mium promptly, and, inasmuch as it is on the Tontine plan, we expect 
soon to draw down nearly as much as we have paid iu. 

The Southebn States. — Are still south of Mason and Dixon's line. 
They still evince somewhat of an antipathy for "carpet-baggers" and 
** niggers," but under the beneficent influence of New England rum and 
lager beer this antipathy is fast disappearing. The Southern States have 
always been solid on the pie question, and have always prided themselves 
upon belonging to the upper crust. 

Civil SERVICE.— The Pie-Biters demand civil service. No flunkey 
should be permitted to speak or act disrespectfully. The pies lose half 
their flavor when accompanied by a bat on the ear from the towel of a 
waiter or a prolific expectoration from his tobocco-staiued lips. We are 
in favor of civil service. 

Our Currency. — We admit, with sadness, that our currency is scarce ; 
but we hope, if elected, to greatly improve the condition of our pockets in 
this particular. 

Closing Remarks.— The survey of our condition as a nation reminds 
us that all our boasted prosperity is but a farce as long as unscrupulous 
manufacturers are permitted to use old and decayed lard in the concoc- 
tion of pies. A pure pie is the safeguard of the gourmand. Pies, hon- 
estly made, are the boss fruit. Fifty millions of Pie- Biters demand that 
the pie shall be unadulterated and unabridged. To make a bad pie is no 
worse a crime than to spoil a good pie. He who corrupts our pies strikes 
at our stomachs and is liable to double us up. Behold the Lord our God 
hath given us a goodly land iu which to make and eat pies, but our only 
safeguard lies in keeping our pastry pure. 

With great respect, your obedient fellow Pie-Biter, T. Crier. 

The National Labor Committee met in Chicago, on Tuesday, and 
decided not to hold a Convention this year. One glance over the city 
convinced them that the attempt would be fruitless. The Democrats had 
not left a drop of whisky in the place. 

The American Photographers are now comparing views in Cincin- 
nati. Their decision. will probably be given in the negative. 



Tho Amcrloan people 

OIlL ..f 

theit t ti by tlie : that controls I 

telegraphic news. In behalf of tha public the '/'. <'. rises to com i 
kick. Be inter) ition to the un titling ol the 

nation by this ancient ordei tif i 
■ 

■ i.i.- on 

! Fresh toe! The 

nation has bo a past wash by the astound- 

■ > that "Gen, R itler i* *till nnaecided as to w 
will pursue during the campaign." Oo th this p tralvsiu 

I i- flwhed across the wires thai " Uen. Grant gives 
nd." The '/'. I 
of (Sod's people evei i I I he Atneri* otn 

this last shock will shatter their reason hopelessly. The p iblic o i 

■ ■ ■ - r * more astounded had it been told that Gen. Grant bi 

solved to |,,iv bis di bi 

The public la hereby cautioned against using any other baking 

i except the To \ I ■ ind eon 

tain more or less deleterious h . ■ . nts. The T. O, wder in 

the boss. Take no other. N ears of constant use by thousands of patrons 

t< monstrated the foil to the '/'. 0. Baking 

Powder : 

Fact No. 1. It contains no alum, being composed of simple protoxide 
of potassium and Marin county Bggs}. 

Fact No. 2. Its raising qualities Are ansurpa Bed, having been known 
on seven distinct occasions to raise the devil in oue round. 

Fact No. 3. -It is good in any shape raw, fried, boiled, basted. scol- 
loped or roasted; may be applied either internally or externally. Cures 
both man and beast. 

In proof of the superiority of his baking powder, the T. ('. begs to sub- 
mit the following testimonial from the eminent apothecary, Dr. I>. Ogdi- 
bus Gibraltar, dealer in .lings aud medicines, retail dealer in cigars, to- 
bacco, etc.: 

To T. Crier, Esq., Sir — This is to certify that I have made a com- 
plete diagnosis .if your baking powder with the following result : 1, The 
T. G. Baking Powder contains oo dynamite. 2. Its sanitary power ia Al. 
3. Its temperature is warm or c >ld, according to the state of the weather. 
1. In my opinion it is the best baking powder iu the market. 

G. OouiBua Gibraltar, M. D., D. I. D., etc, 

P. S.-~Send fee of $20 by registered letter. 

That Colusa girl has been playing another racket. Her bean called 
to see her last Sunday evening, but she pretended to be out. < hi the re.tr 
Btoop she bad made up a dummy man and was hugging him for dear life, 
when the original J.ieohs n>mes on the scene. B-ing discovered, woman- 
like, she screams and llees, while her enraged beau, like an ea^le sweep 
ing upon its prey, falls furiously upon the poor dummy and both topple 
over the stoop into the garden. Result : The Colusa girl laughs till her 
ejesare deluged with glistening tears, her mortified beau picks himself 
up to Hud a big rent in the posterior portion of his ten-dollar pants, and 
the dummy— well, every girl in Calusa is dummy-founded. 

The political campaign being now fairly opened, the T. 0. desires to 
offer to the public the following outfit, nearly new, which will be sold for 
any reasonable amount that may be offered: Oue barrel of hog-wash, war- 
ranted to emit forty-seven distinct smells; oue thousand campaign lies, 
imported from New York; two hogsheads of Missouri mud; one mud- 
slinging machine, runs without greasing; eighty barrels of rotgut whisky, 
with a portable bung-hole attachment; ten thousand cabogana cigars, with 
mustard plasters for the victims' necks; one Blaine (or Cleveland) hat; 
sixteen gallons of gall aud a pair of brass protectors for the anatomy. 

It Is suggested by some enemy of Mormonism that a colony of two 
hundred thousand Irish be established in Utah to counteract the influ- 
ence of the Saints. I have no doubt such a colony would be a great 
nuisance to the Mormons. It would be to any one. But I imagine Pat 
would soon be converted to the Mormon faith. The chance of having 
two wives to beat instead of one, would be a temptatiou he could never 
resist. 

Several Russian women and girls have been arrested for conspiracy 
against the Government. They were discovered making crazy quilts, and 
the police mistook their work for maps of a proposed dynamite explosion. 

The Parisian sufferers have at last found relief. The new divorce 
law has been gazetted. Three thousand divorce suits have already been 
commenced. There seems to be a general rising of the tied. 

Moncurc D. Conway lias said farewell to England. We congratulate 
Great Britain, but it is with sad and feeble heart, for we learn that Con- 
way intends returning to the United States. 

Mr. Tilden is reported to be an indefatigable reader. He is said to be 
the only man in America who has read the national Democratic aud Re- 
publican platforms. 

General Gordon is reported safe, and possessed of abundant pro- 
visions and ammunition. This relieves our mind. We are glad to heat- 
that he is Soudan well fixed, 

A pressman is always a man of note, but very seldom holds one. — Ex- 
change. Probably his "grippers" are weak, or perhaps he does not care 
to preserve such "tokens." 

The Blaine Invinciblcs of this city are determined to have a wig- 
wam. When it is completed, they ought to send for Logan, the Mingo 
Chief. 

As soon as death overtakes us there is a man ready to do the under- 
taking. This is a sad thought and should not be re-hearsed. 

" Old Sock," a Yakima Indian, died recently at the age of 118, He 
was so named because he was never known to wash. 

Guinness, the brewer, is said to own the finest house in Dublin. His 
fashionable "hops" are much admired. 

The principal attraction at the seashore is the live stock — the 
calves, for instance. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A^D 



Ana 2. 1884. 



C P R R 

Time Schedule-Tuesday" July 1st, 1884, 

Trains leave, and are due to arrive at, 

S an Francisco as follows: 



LEAVE 

(for, 



DESTINATION. 



8:00 a.m. 
3:00 P.M. 
4:00 P.M. 
tS:00 A.M. 
"9:30 a.m. 
3:30 P.M. 
8:00 a.m. 
*4 :00 p.m. 
S:00a.m. 
3:00 P.M. 
3:30 p.m. 
7:00 P. M 
7:30 a.m. 
♦3:30 P.M. 
7:30 a.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
3:30 p. M. 
7:30 A.M. 
"5:00 p.m. 
*9:30 a.m. 
330 p.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
7:00 p.m 
7:30 a.m. 
10:00 A.M. 
3:00 p.m 
•5:00 P.M. 
3:00 p.m 
7:00 P.M. 
8:00 A.M, 
8:00 a.m, 
8:00 a.m, 
7:30 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
3:00 P.M. 
4:00 P.M. 
*4:00 p.m, 
7:30 A.M. 
tl0:00 A.M. 
3:00 P.M. 
8:00 A.M. 
"9:30 a.m. 
3:00 P.M. 
4:00 p.m. 
3:00 P.M. 
8:00 a.m 
4:00 P m. 



ARRIVS 
(from) 



.Byron and Martinez . 



. . Calistoga and Napa 



....Colfax.. 



.. J Deming, El Paso ) Express... 

. \ and East f Emigrant 

, . j Gait and J via Livermore.... 
. . ( Stockton ) via Martinez 

...lone 

. . . Knight's Landing 

...Los Angelea aud South 

. . Livermore and Pleasanton. . 

. 1 Merced, Madera, ( 

. J Fresno and Tulare J 

...Marysville and Chico 

. J Mojave, Needles I Express . . 

. j and East f Emigrant. 

. . . Nilea and Hay wards 



, j Ogden and I Express 



_ East f Emigrant 

j Red Bluff ) viaMar.sville. 
. | and Tehama ("via Woodland. 

..Redding 

...Sacramento via Livermore.. 

" via Benicia 

" via Bcuiuia 

" via Benicia... . 
...Sacramento River Steamers. 
, ..San Jose 



...Vallejo., 



...Virginia City , 

...Woodland 



6:40 p.m. 

7:40 A.M. 

10:10 A.M. 
1t<!:40 P.M. 
•12:10 P.M. 

9.10 a.m. 
•10:10 A.M. 

0:40 P.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

7:40 A.M. 

9:10 a.m. 

6:10 A.M. 

5:40 p.m. 
•12:10 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 
10.10 A.M. 

9:10 A.M. 

5:40 P.M. 
*8:40 A.M. 
12:10 p.m. 

0:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

9:10a.M. 

0:10 a.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

3:40 p.m. 

&:40 A.M. 
*8:40 A.M 

7:40 a.m. 
11:40 A.M. 

5:40 P.M. 

6:40 p.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

5:40 p.m. 

6:40 P.M. 

7:40 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 
♦6:00 a. M. 
*3:40 P.M. 
J3:40 P.M. 

9:40 A.M. 

6:40 P.M 
12:10 p.m. 

9:10 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

6:40 P.M. 
10:10 A.M. 



Train leaving San Francisco at 7:00 a. m. can meet 
Pacific Express from Ogden at Oakland Pier; and that 
leaving at 8:30 A. M. can meet Pacinc Express from The 
Needles and El Paso at Oakland Pier. 
"Sundays excepted. {Sundays only. 

TDaily from Martinez. Sundays oi.ly from Byron. 



LOCAL FERRY TRAINS. 
From "8AN FBABTC1SCO." Pally. 



To EAST OAKLAND— «6:(l0, *6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 
8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 6:00, 5:30, 
6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, '12:00. 

To FRUIT VALE— '6:00, '6:30, «7:00, '7:30. ^OO, "8:30, 
"3:30, s^OO, *4:30, *5:00, *5:30, »6:00, *6:30, 9:00. 

To FRUIT VALE (via Alameda)— *9:30, 6:30, (11:00, 
*12:00. 

To A LAMEDA— *6:00, *6:30, 7:00, '7:30, 8:00, *8:30, 9:00, 
9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, (12:30, 1:00, 
(1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:30, 6:00, 6:30, 
7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To BERKELEY — "6:00, »6:30, 7:00, «7:30, 8:00, «8:30, 
9:00, (9:30, 10:00, (10:30, 11:00, (11:30, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4-30, 5:00, 5:30, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 
9:00, 10:00, 11:00, *12:00. 

To WEST BERKELEY— '6:00, *6:30, 7:00, *7:30, (8:00, 
'8:30, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, (1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, *4:30, 
5:00, »5:30, 6:00, '6:30, 7:00. 



To "SAM FBAHTCISCO." Dally. 

From FRUIT VALE— •.'6:23, *6:53, »7:23, •7:58, <'8:23, 
"8:53, *9:28, '10:21, "4:23, "4:53, *5:23, *6:58, *6:23, 
•6:53, 7:25, 9:50. 

From FRUIT VALE (via Alameda>-'5:15, "5:46, (0:45, 
9:15, »3:15. 

From EAST OAKLAND— *5:30, *6:00. 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 
8:00,8:30, 9:00, 9:30,10:00,10:30,11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 
12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30,5:00, 
6:30, (i:u0, 6:30, 7:00, 7:57, 8:57, 9:57, 10:57. 

From BROADWAY, Oakland -'5:37, *6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 
7:37. 8:07, 8:37, 9:07, 9:37, 10:07, 10:37, 11:07, 11:37, 12:07, 
12:37, 1:07, 1:37, 2:07, 2:37, 3:07, 3:37, 4:07, 4:37, 6:07, 
5:37, 6:07, 6:37, 7:07, 8:06, 9:06, 10:06, 11:06. 

From ALAMEDA— »5:22, '6:52, "6:22, 6:52, "7:22. 7:52, 
"8:22, 8:52, 9:22, 9:52, (10:22, 10:52, (11:22, 11:52, 
(12:22, 12:52, (1:22, 1:52, 2:52, 3:22, 3:52, 4:22, 4:52, 
6:22, 5:62, 6:22, 6:52, 7:52, 8:52, 9:52, 10:52. 

From BERKELEY-»5:16, «6:45, "6:15, 6:45, «7:15, 7:45, 
"8:16, 8:45, [9:16, 9:45, (10:15, 10:45, (11:15, 11:45, 
12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 4:15, 4:45, 5:16, 6:45, 6:15, 6:45, 
7"45 8:45 9:45 10*45 

From WEST 'liKRKELEY — -»5:45, ">6:15, 6:45, '7:15, 
7:45, 8:45, (9:16, 9:45, 10:45, (12:45, 1:45, 2:46, 3:45, 
4:45, •5:15, 6:45, *6:15, 6:45, »7:16. 







Creels 


Bonce. 








From SAN 


F1UNCI! -." 


-•7:15, 9:15 


, 11:16 


, 1:16,3 i 


6:16. 














From OAKLAND 


-•6:15, 8:15, 10:15, 


12:15, 


LAb 


4:15. 



•Sundays excepted. fSundaya only. 



" Standard Ti uc" furnished, by Randolph & Co., Jew- 
elers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
A. N. TOWNE, T. H. GOODMAN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 




Broad Gauge. 

COMMMENCING May 4, 18S4, and until f urther notice, 
Boats and Trains will leave from and arrive at San 
Francisco Passenger Depot, MARKET-ST. WHARF, 
as follows: 



Leave S- F. 



7:40 a. m. 
5:00 p. m, 



Sundays. 



3:00 a. m, 
5:30 p. m. 



Destination. Arrive in S. F. 



Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa & 
Way Stations. 



Fulton, 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale 

and 

Way Stations. 



Sundays 



9:10 A. m, 
6:45 p. u. 



Week 
Days. 



6:45 A. M. 
S:50 a. m. 
6:10 p. m. 



8:50 A. m. 
6:10 p. m. 



7:40 a. m. |8:00 a_m. | Guenieyilte. [6:45 p. M.|li:10 p" m. 



Exc pt 
Satur- 
days, j 

:00 p. m. 1 8:20 a. 



Donahue. 



|7:00p. m.|10:OOa.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Sebastopol and Mark 
West Springs. At Clairville for Skaggs Springs, and at 
Cloverdale for Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay. 
Lakeport, Bartlett Spriugs. Okiah. Eureka, Navarro 
Ridge, Mendocino City, Westport and the Geysers. 



EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturday to Monday, 
to Petaluma, SI 75 ; to Santa Rosa, §3 ; to Healdsburg, 
§4 ; to Cloverdale, $5. 



EXCURSION TICKETS good for Sundays only.-To 
Petaluma, $1 50 ; to Santa Rosa, $2 ; to Healdsburg, S3; 
to Cloverdale, §4 50 ; to Guerneville, S3. 



From San Francisco to Point Tiburon and San Ra- 
fael, Week Days— 7:40 a. M., 9:20 A. M , 2:00 p. m., 5:00 
p. m., 6:30 p. m ; Sundays: 8:00 a. m., 9:30 A. m., 12:00 .m., 
2:30 p m., 5:30 p. m. 

To San Francipco from San Rafael, Week Days-5:40 
A. m., 8:00 a. m., 10.30 a. m , 3:10 P. m., 5:10 p. m.; Sun- 
days: 8:10 a. M , 10:45 a. m., 1:10 p. m., 4:00 p. m., 
5:50 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week Days— 
6:10 A. M., 8:20 A. M., 10:50 A. M. 3:30 p. M., 6:33 p M.; 
Sundays 8:35 a. m., 11:05 a. m., 1:30 p. m., 4:20 p.m., 
6:10 p. m. 



ARTHUR HUGHES. PETER J. McGLYNN, 

General Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 



Saucelito— San Rafael—San Quentin, 

—VIA — 

NORTH PACIFIC COAST 

RAILROAD- 
TIME TABLE. 

Comniendna Monday, May 12, 1884, and 
until further notice, Boats and Trains will 
run as follmos: 

For SAN RAFAEL and SAUCELITO (week days)- 
7:30, 9:15 a. m.; 1:30, 3:20, 4:50, 6:15 p. m. (Sundays)— 
8:00, 10:00, 11:30 a. m.; 1:30, 4:30, 6:30 p. m. 

From SAN RAFAEL (week days) -6:15, 7:45, 9:20 A. 
m; 2:00, 3:25, 4:50 p. m. (Sundays)— 7:55, 10:00,11:30 
A. m.; 3:15, 4:30, 6:30 p. m. 



From SAUCELITO (week days)— 6:45, 8:15, 10:00 A. 
M.; 2:30, 3:55, 5:30 P. m. (Sundays) -8:30, 10:30 a. m.; 
12:00 M.; 3-45. 6:00, 7:10 P. m. 

Extra Trip --From Saucelito, on Saturday, at 7:00 p. M. 



7:30 A.M. and 1:30 P. M. -Daily, Sundays 
excepted, THROUGH TRAINS for Duncan Mills and 
Way-Stations. (Through trains from Duncan Mills ar- 
rives in S. F. at 10:30 a m and 6:00 p. m.) 



Stage Connections. 

Stages leave Duncan Mills every morning except Mon- 
days, for Stewart's Point, Gualala, Point Arena, Cuffey's 
Cove, Navarro, Mendocino City, Caspar, Noyo, Kibe- 
sillah, Westport and all points on the north coast. 



Saturday to Monday Excursions. 

Excursion Tickets sold on Saturdays, good to return 
following Monday: Fairfax, $1; Camp Taylor, §2; Point 
Reyes, 32.50; Tomales,S3 50; Duncan Mills, £4. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8:00 A.M. (Sundays only)— Excursion Train for 
Duncan Mills and Way-Stations. Returning, arrives in 
San Francisco at 7:40 p. m. 

Fares for Round Trip: Camp Taylor, $1:75 ; Pont 
Reyes, $2. Tomales, $2.50; Duncan Mills, $3. 

DAVID NYE, F. B. LATHAM, 

Gen'l Superintendent. Gen'l Pass, and Ticket Agent. 
GENERAL OFFICES, 408 CALIFORNIA STREET. 




BROAD GAUOE. 



Summer Arran^cmoiit. 

Commencing: Sunday, May 4, 1884, 

And until further notice, Passenger Trains will leave 
from and arrive at San Francisco Passenger Depot 
(Townsend St., between 3d and 4th streets), as follows: 



leave 
S. P. 



8:30 a.m. 
t9:30 a m. 
10:40 a.m. 
*3:30 p.m. 

4:25 p.m. 
"5:15 p.m. 

6:30 p.m. 
$11:45 p.m. 



DESTINATION. 



ARRIVE 
8. P. 



.San Mateo, Redwood,. 
....and Menlo Park 



6:40 a.m. 
* 8:10 a.m. 

9:03 am. 
*10:02 A M. 
" 3:36 p.m. 
t 4:59 p.m. 
; 6:00 P.M. 
,t 7:50 p.m. 
! t 8:15 pm. 



8:30 A.M. I ( \ 

M.»n „'„■ j ., Santa Clara, San Joseand.. ! 
4 : 25pm ! I ••Principal Way Stations... f 



9:03 A.M 
*10:02 a.M. 
• 3:36 p.m. 

6:00 P.M. 
+ S: 15 p.m. 



10:40 a.m. | j GHroy, Pajaro, Castroville 
p.m |J ...Salinas and Monterey ... 



!:30 i 



10:40 a.m. 
3:30 



i£H- 



Hollisterand Tres Pinos., 



{Watsonville, Camp Goodall, ) 
Aptos, New Brighton, Soquel f 
(Camp Capitola) and Santa [ 
Cruz ) 



'10:02 A.M. 
0:00 P.M 



10:02 A.M. 
6:00 p M. 



'10:03 AM. 
0.00 P.M. 



10:40 A.M.).. .Sole dad and Way Stations. . . f 6:00 p.* 
t 7:50 A.l* 



i M [J ..Monterey and Santa Cruz., 
' 'I ( (Sunday Excursions)..., 



t 8:55 I 



•Sundays excepted. 
Saturdays only. 



tSundays only. JTheatre train 



STAGE CONNECTIONS are made with the 10:40 A. M. 
Train, except PESCADERO Stages via San Mateo and 
Redwood, and PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS Stage 
via Santa Clara, which connect with 8:30 a. m. Train. 

SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP TICKETS -At Reduced 
Rates— to Monterey, Soquel, Santa Cruz and Pesca- 
dero ; also to Gilroy, Paraisn and Paso Robles Springs. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 

e- - c..«^ n ™ ™i„ ( Sold Sunday Morning ; good for 
For Sundays only, | Returi] ^^ day . 

For Saturday, f" Sold Sati/rday and Si'nday only ; 
Sunday and< good for Return until following Mon- 
Monday (day, inclusive, at the following rates: 



Round Trip 
from San 
Francisco to 

San Bruno., 
Millbrae .... 
Oak Grove. . 
San Mateo. 
Belmont.... 
Redwood.... 
Fair Oaks... 
Menlo Park 
Mayfield .... 



Sim 
Tkt. 



76 
1 00 

1 no 

1 25 
1 25 
1 25 



Sat to 
Mon. 
Tkt. 

f 50 
65 
90 
1 10 
1 25 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 75 



Round Trip Q Sat to 



from San 
Franci co to 



Mount' n View 
Lawrences... 
Santa Clara . 
San Jose.... 

Gilroy 

Aptos 

Soquel 

Santa Cruz.. 
Monterey .. . 



Tkt. 



1 75 

2 75 

3 00 



3 00 



Mon. 

Tkt, 



2 25 
2 50 
2 50 

4 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



TICKET OFFICES. - Passenger Depot, v Townsend 
street; Valencia-street Station, and No. 613 Market 
street, Grand Hotel. 
A. C. BASSETT, H. R. JUDAH, 

Superintendent. Asst. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 

1&~ SOUTHERN 1»I VISIONS. -^fi 
For points on Southern Divisions and the East, see 
C. P. R. R. Time Schedule. 



SONOMA VALLEY R. R. 

(Branch 8. F. and y. J*. B. It.) 

Boats and'Trains Leave San Francisco as follows : 

3./~\/~\ p.m., Daily (Sundays excepted), from WASH- 
■ VVV-/ INGTON-STREKT WHARF, for the Town 
of Sonoma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. 



Sunday Excursions. 

8*Or^ a- m. (Sundays only), from WASHINGTON- 
.£L\J STREET WHARF, for the Town of So- 
noma, Glen Ellen and Way Points. Round-Trip Tickets : 
To Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1 50. 
PETER J. McGLYNN, ARTHUR HUGHES, 

Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. General Manager. 



THE FOURTH. 

A little pistol, 

But a toy — 
A little powder 

And a boy. 
A little blowing 

In the barrel ; 
A little angel's 

Bright apparel. 



\ 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



BIZ." 



Our Grain Harvesting)- pi .tftahotorlly to all eon 

'I'd,- Wornl crop «ill bt v. tv \irgf and ol iup*rior quality; that «»f lUr- 
ley Mill I* Dp t.i ti q mntiiy. bat not iii oolor, being rtbaUj 

'• il l.y id.. \%t4> r.tin-, datni |o >tit\. 

iropt of Corn and Beans 1< >■ prnmitlnR, but tnft latter will 
Ml in thu >-f teal V'-.ir. Pratt* and Vegetal 
plentiful Ani i ity. and ■elling at fair prices. Our trait-can- 

ner* are putting Dp less than usual. 

Bualnoaa In general |i fen >iull and trade seems t»« be langnjahing. 
[mporta by ten and rail an both fro* ami liberal, ami vet tha o >niitry <!.- 
hi mi for genera] merofaandi^- in .Ui..%[.|.<iintin r i' i* nut up to the average 
of (>.i_»t itt>Mon-4. Tin. NnrthwcNt dooi not bay "f in •»* heretofore, draw- 
■ Ureal from the Bast by the Northern Pacdfio Rail- 
n>ad, while tnc Bontfaern Paci6c Railroad oontribntea dlreotly into the 
It i' of I. \ i slee and her trlbutarm*. 'I'd.' ilivi-rsion >>f 
our export shipping trade from this city to BenJofn, Porl Costa, Vallojo 
and Whaatporl il i M-rioaa loai to u- and to real estate ImMera aloiiL,- the 
water-front, and withdrawn a Jar*;*? amount of patronage rightly due to 
our warehousemen and draymen, etc., and detract* greatly from the city'* 
Inoome, Large moneys have been exjwnded by our city and State in the 
erection "f Boeda, etc., along the city IV n\ - i wall, etc., ami yet com- 
l»aratively very little drain i* landed or stored therein. The time is not 
f.tr distant whfti. for our own protection and to regain a portion of this 
trade, that all toll* and wharfage musl be done uw.iy with and every fa- 
cility held out to the farmer to send his Grain and Produce to this city. 
The refusal of nor iJowrnment to allow us the use of Goat Island for 
the erection of wharves ari'l shed< is the direct cause ot this diversion of 
our trade. The Central Pacific Railroad had the aood of our city in 
mind when they fought for the Island upon which to erect their depots, 
but the BuBfUn press and its adherents were the instruments used to beg- 
gar the city by this then nnthought of diversion. 

The Oceanic steamship, of the 0. and 0. S. S. Co's line, arrived 
here on Sunday hist, duly 27th, bringing some 500 Chinese and other pas- 
sengers, ami for cars;o 5,333 pkgs. Tea, 10,257 mats Rice, 1,101 bales Cal- 
cutta Gunnies, ...immi pk-s. < 'hnw-Chnw, etc. She also brought, in transit 
from China and Japan, for Eastern cities, 20,327 pkgs. Tea, 441 pkgs. 
Silks, etc. 

From Honolulu we have the Emma Clandina, with 5,800 hags Sugar; 
the Kalakau, with 4.S7S hags Sn^'ur and lI'J'J hbls. Molasses, 520 bags Rice. 
Boeario, from lvahnlui, with 5,121 ba^-s Sugar, and the schr. 
Anna, from same, with 5,580 bags Sugar. 

Now York.— The ship Cyrus Wakefield, 133 days from New York, to 
Sutton & Beehe, had a large and valuable «argo of general merchandise. 

Choumagln Island.— The second cargo of Codfish for the season is at 
hand, per schr. John Hancock, with 100,000 tisb to LyDde & Hough. 

Baltimore. ■ Ship Jabez Howes, 142 days from Baltimore to John 
Rosenfeld, has 2,000 tons Cumberland Coal. 

Tahiti.— The bkte. City of Papeete, 40 days from the Islands, brought 
for cargo 350,000 Oranges, etc. 

London.— Br. ship City of Lucknow, 113 days, to Richards & Harri- 
s"n. hronght a valuable cargo of General Merchandise, consisting in part 
of 3,700 bbls. Cement, 500 tons Scrap Iron, Manufactured Iron, Steel, etc. 

Exports i leading items' for the week include the following: To West- 
port, Ireland, 12,000 bbls. Flour and 8,308 ctls. Wheat, per Br. bk. Earl 
Derbv. To China, per P. M. S. S. City of Peking, 13,335 hbls. Flour, 
11,652 lbs. Ginseng and General Merchandise; value, §104,482; also, in 
Treasure. .$484,330. To Japan, 278 bbls. Flour and Mdse., value $10,001; 
also, in Treasure, §75,002. To Victoria, B. C, per Queen of the Pacilic, 
32,000 lbs. Rice, 10,205 lbs. Sugar, 4,500 lbs. Tea, and Merchandise ; 
value. $30,000. To Honolulu, per Discovery, 688 bbls. Flour, and Mer- 
chandise; value, $17,689. 

To Cork for Orders.— The Br. ship Coringa, hence July 28tb, carried 
41,248 ctls. Wheat; value, $03,650. 

Freights and Charters,— We note the following engagements : Br. 
ship Raglan Castle (iron), 1,059 tons, Wheat to Cork, TJ. K., £2 5s.; if to 
a direct port, 2s. 6d, less ; Br. ship Haddon Hall (iron), 1,450 tons. Wheat 
to Cork, IT. K., £2 3s. 9d. (long lay days until September 15r,h); Br. ship 
Respigadera (iron), 1,029 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2 Is. 3d. (short 
lay days, say till Augnst 19th); ship Palmyra, 1,359 tons. Wheat to Cork, 
U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £2 ; Br. ship Duke of Connaught (iron), 
formerly City of Madras, 999 tons, now at Victoria, is to load Lumber at 
Burrard Inlet for Valparaiso ; Br. ship Great Victoria (iron), 2,268 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 17s. 6d.; if to a direct port, 
2s. 6d. less; ship Annie H. Smith, 1,452 tons, Coal from Seattle to this 
port ; bark Henry Buck, 658 tons, Lumber from Puget Sound to Panama ; 
ship Alameda, 1,475 tons, now at Portland, Flour and Salmon thence to 
London, £2 5s.; Br. ship New York (iron), 2,699 tons, Wheat to Cork, 
U. K., owner's occount ; ship Oriental, 1,688 tons, Coal from Tacoma to 
this port ; ship Santa Clara, 1,525 tons. Wheat to Liverpool, £1 15s.; ship 
St. Charles, 1,749 tons, Wheat to Liverpool or London direct, £1 17s. 6d.; 
ship Gatherer, 1,509 tons, Wheat to Dublin direct, £1 17s. 6d. There is 
now on the berth 58,000 tons, against 22,000 tons one year ago. Disen- 
gaged, 125,000 tons; same time 1883, 85,500 tons. Fleet to arrive, 237,- 
000 tons ; same time 1883, 314,000 tons ; same time 1882, 284,000 tons; 
same time 1881, 352,000 tons. 

Wheat.— The Spot market is firm at $1 37-i@l 42i tf ctl. for No. 1; 
Extra Choice, $1 45; No. 1, buyer 1884, $1 42; buyer season, $1 4Gi; 
seller 1884, $1 36A@1 37£. 

Barley.— Spot prices of Brewing, 95c. @$1 05 per ctl.; Feed, 80@87£c; 
buyer 1884, 90c; seller 1884, S2ic. 

Coal, — This has been another eventful week in the Coal trade. No 
changes made in quotations, and but few sales to note. 

Pig-iron. — Business is almost at a stand-still in this article, with no 
immediate prospect of much improvement. 



Drink the Fredericksburg Brewing Company's Kaiser Beer, 
pleasing flavor and sparkling body cannot be surpassed. 



Its 



SOUTH PACIFIC COAST RAILROAD. 

PuMngcr Train. Ira.. I ..l \, \ it k K I STRUT, SOUTH .-- 1 1 > l . . *l 

8.QO *. a , dally- Alnndo, Nowmrk, Q la I in BAM 

.o\-> jusi 






ITrlgh 



.. Qlomraod, I- 1ANTA CRUZ 



Mil.'. Hi > , BAD JOBB, i 

Stations to mm \ ORI 2 P 

i'SD 1 " ,l " 1 ' lor BAN JOBB, I point*. 

^ • s-'^ BatnrdaiaatMl 8u laya to Bute I 

IR KXl I HSION8 to SANTA i 111 Z*»d S3 SO InS.tS JOflBoi Sill I1HAYS 

S-"-' iii.lsiMi.il., to return until MONDAY, In 

8 OH * H.-BVBRY BTSDAY, KXi.TllsloN t>. SAN HiSK, l:h. i 
■ % -"-' and SANTA CRUZ. 
g:t to Hlk' Troul anil Sanu Cruz; 81 75 to SauU Clara an. I Ban 1 

TO OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA. 

... 1 :.. -i. 1.-0:00-9:30-10:00-10:30-11:00-11 
1112:00 11 • i—l:S0—" I .. ■. I.-... laO 5:00 :.:.w-U:00- 

11:16 p. ii. 
Prom FOURTEENTH AND WBBSTBB 8TRBBTB, OAKLAND 

w-8:00-8:30 :•:". 0:80 U':".l 10210 "il:i». Il i « 111:00 

— 12:30-«JI:00-1:30 3:00—1^0—4:00 il i. 

7:00 ?:80 ' i 10:4 i 11:45 r. » 
From llliill BTRBBT, ALAMEDA: $.'.:16-S5:«! -80:10 -0:40— 7:l«l 7 HI 8:10 

8:t0 — 9:16 0:18 ■ 0:48- I 111:48 a u. 18:18-112:40 1:18 1:48 

1:18 2:48-8:18-8:48— »:'.0-l i:!8 5:48 8:18 6:48 r:l8 8:18 11...1 r. m. 

|8andayi cxcoiitud. «jsntiir.!;us and s bvyi only. 

TICKET, Telegraph and Tranitor Offloe, 292 MONTQOMBEY BT.,8an Fi 

L. FILLMOI1K, auperlDtoDdent, ft. M. OARRATT, U. F. and I'. A_, ..1. 



WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Renrrsrntttl hy: 
AGENCY OF AQBNCY n|' 

WM. T. COLEMAN & CO., WM. T. COLEMAN Sc CO.. 

32 RIVER STREET. Flavel's Warehouse, 

tiii.Mir.i, iiiin. .ix Astoria, Oregon. 

MR. ECftENE E. JONE, 

4 BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN. 

HiNDllN, E. C. 

San Francisco siml Nov York. 

~h7m. NEWHfcLL & CO., 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

NO. 309 SANSOME STREET, 

[Jan. 12] SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 

H. B. Williams. a. Ciikhkhiioi'uii. W. II. DmoND. 

WILLIAMS, DIM0ND & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING .JUNCTION MARKET AND I'INK STREETS. 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Company. 

Thu Cuimnl Roj'at Mail Stcumshijj Cmiijiaiiy, " The California Litio nf Clip|iorH," 
from New York and Boston, and " The Hawaiian Line." March 21. 



C. 



ADOLPHE LOW & CO., 

Commission Merchants. 
SJJf FRANCISCO and NEW YORE. 

gg- Agnnta of American Sugar Refinery, corner of Union and Battery streets, 
San Francisco, California, __^ Jan. 17. 

THOMAS PRICE, 

CHE3IIOAL JL, A.BOR. A.TO K. Y, 

Assay Office, Bullion Rooms and Ore Floors. 

^g" Coin Returns on all Bullion Deposit* in 24 Hours. 

Car.-Iul Analyals made of Waters, In.lUMtrial ProduuLH, etc. Mines examined and 
reported upon. ConaultatiniiB on Orea, Metals, Chemical and Metallurgical subjects. 

521 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

SAN FltANCISCO. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY 

No- 310 Sansome Street, 

San Fkakcibco, 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FVRS. 

[September 21.1 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Hold Medal, Paris, 1878. 

Sold by all Statloiiers. SoleAgreut Tor the Umletl Ntates: 
MR. HENRY HOE.yi John street, N. Y. Jan. 6. 

BOZO RAD0VICH, 

Importer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Fine Wines sincl Liquors, 

29 Geary street, San FrancjNCO. 



California Wines for Family use a specialty. 



May 3. 



HASTINGS' COLLEGE OF THE LAW. 

The Next Session will Oneu on Tharmlay, Ancust 7th, at 
o'clock a. m., In the HALL OF THE PIONEEK SOCIETY, on Montgomery 
street. Examinations for admission and deferred examinations on August Uh, 7th 
and 8th, at M a. m., in the same place. Applications for admission should he made 
to the Dean, at his oHice, No. 41S California street, San Francisco. 

[July 19.] ROIJERT P. HASTINGS, Dean. 



14 



SAN FKANOISCO NEWS LETTER £nD 



Au~ 2. 1884. 



MAG'S LETTER. 
Dear N. L.: They say 't the whole town's most wild for fear o' dis- 
closures in the celebrated case. The Judge says 't the annals o 1 old 
Bailey (or some such name) is nothin' to it. His last riddle is : " Why 
would it be suitable to erect a monument to the ' Lady Plaintiff ' right on 
the witness stand ?" " 'Cause ' Here Lies Altbea,' would be a most ap- 
propriate and fitting tribute to her." Ned says 't the next sensation ? ts 
in preparation for the town 's a breach o* promise suit, in which details 
of a trip to China '11 be a spicy morsel for the old clash bag 'n her associ- 
ates. Ma says 't she can't for the life o' her make out why girls '11 be 
such born fools as to go 'n play fast an' loose, when they've got a fellah 
actually a bitin'; for just look 't the loads o' girls 'ts goin' a beggin'. 
(Now, o' course, I don't mean really 'u truly goin 'round askin' for things, 
but ready to jump at the word " will you?') If you don't b'lieve me, 
I'll just enumerate a few for you. There's first, for all, the well known so- 
ciety belle 'ts served in that capacity for thirty odd years. Like Cleo- 
patra, age don't seem to wither her. (She's real fleshy). Then next, in 
point o' seniority comes the fam'ly o' sisters. Ma says 't they'd a got mar- 
ried long ago, 'cause they used to be real nice, lady-like girls ; but la me, 
they was aimin' for millionaires, 'n the poor men couldn't afford 'em, 
cause they've got real extravagant habits. Then there's Flora, 'ts spend- 
in' her best days chasin' a forlorn hope; 'cause when a young man gets 
kind o' thick with a married woman, he don't sort o' hanker after a 
wife o' his own; that's 'bout the size of it. 

Kate F's another girl 'ts bound to be an old maid. She's a pocket edi- 
tion o* her pa. (Ned says that's impossible, 'cause one o' that size couldn't 
live, even a midget 'd discount it). Then the B. girls *n the G.'a 'n P.'s 
'n A.'s, 'n so forth. Why, it's real wonderful bow all the nice girls 'ts to 
be had for the askin' in the matrimonial market o' 'Frisco. Divorced 
wimmen plays the old mischief with the girls' chances, 'n there ought to 
he a law to make 'em take a back seat, so there ought. (The engagement 
'ts just been broken off 'sail due to one, they say). I'd just like to know how 
on top o' this earth a girl's goin' to make a good match, anyhow. Most 
cases 't girls 't are real nice an' sweet 's awful poor, 'n can't go tourin' 
around unless they find some kind friend like Mrs. Hearst to take 'em 
along. So where are they a goin' to meet a rich man ? The rest o' the 
beaux, they ain't actual courtin' beaux at all. What they 're after their- 
nelves is coin. Ed. Greenaway & Co. is gettin' up a demonstration o' 
welcome to Miss Jenny when she returns next mouth, but 'taint decided 
yet what form it'll take. (I reckon that young man aforesaid 'd like to 
demonstrate on the general form hisself). He's got a rival in a army ofli- 
cer 'ts a reg'lar ass, the girls say 't know him. (I just met him once, 'n 
you bet I thought so, too). He puts on awful style 'cause his fam'ly had 
a Irish patriot in it. (La me, Irish riots with Pats in 'em 's too common 
for anything to be'proud of, it 'pears to me). He was to the opera t'other 
night, tryin' to mash a rich girl 't little Consul Olavonsky had in tow. 
(Don't you go an' say 't I said bit the toe. Printer's devils just play the 
very d — 1 with type in settin' it up, don't they sometimes— ain't that 
what the devils is for)? An' 'twas real amusin' to see the way 't the Rus- 
sian was glarin' at him. Op'ra parties is gettin' to be the style again, 
though prices for seats is so high 't it's goin* to be real searchin' on the 
young men's pockets. But they do say 't one Society beau struck upon 
an excellent idea. He got acquainted with some o* the singers, an' gets 
passes from 'em. 

Ned says 't the fat boy 's kind o' furious 'cause his story paper ain't 
recognized as one o' the press, an' he has to pay for his'n. He's gettin' 
Althea to weave some fancies for his Weakly production, in hopes o' doin' 
a big bizness. I reckon he'd better take to blowin' soap bubbles. The 
big one called reputation, 't burst at the cannon's mouth once 'pon a time, 
's given 'em a sort o' distaste for bubbles, though they're tall hands at 
blowin". But la me, here I am most through my letter 'n forgettin' all 
about tellin' you what we heard o' that affair to the Palace Hotel 't I 
t^poke of to you in my last. Well, you know, o' course, 't all the rooms 
has doors ; t '11 open into the next one (if you want 'em to); most folks 
keeps 'em locked, though, 'cause they have just one suite o' rooms. But 
to go on. A certain couple from the rural districts come to the hotel, 'n 
was what the Judge calls duly installed in a fine suite, an' the bride, bein' 
a kind o' fresh, her husband thought he'd lock her in when he went down 
to see a man. She got sort o' tired hangin' round, so she began to invest- 
igate her quarters, lookin* into the closets 'n tryin' doors 'n so forth. 
First thing she knew she had opened the one connectin' the one with the 
next suite, 'n findin' it looked awful tasty in there she just walked boldly 
in. Keal cosy arm-chairs 'n fixins o' all kind o' gimcracks kept her atten- 
tion, so she didn't notice a very good lookin' fellow 't was a sittin' lookin' 
at her. I'm sure I don't know what happened 't made the husband 
threaten to swear out a warrant 'gainst Count Smith an' Co. for havin' 
spirits goin' round takin' off folks through walls ('cause he had the key o' 
the door in his own pants pocket). The wife returned next day, savin' she'd 
been sent for by the most awful hidjous- lookin' monster to see if she could 
crawl through a transom, an' 'cause she refused they locked her up in a 
dark room all night. No one would a known what I've been a tellin' you 
but the owner o* the adjoinin' apartment, only 't the chambermaid found 
it out in some way, an' bein' killin' intimate with a friend o' old Mr. H.'s 
she told her, an* so, o' course, the story got to the Club *n the Judge told 
us. Ned says 't the moral of it is the exemplification (Lnrdy, ain't that 
a awful long word) 't some folks catch on to an idea right smart when 
they're in danger o' gettin' left, an' the recent inspection tour gave a 
brilliant one to the rural district visitor. 

I tell you what, there's been no small-sized flutter 'mong the " daugh- 
ters o' fashion " (Ned says that phrase takes in all kinds), on account o' 
the Baron playin' the rocket bizness— comin' down like a stick. Why on 
top o' this earth don't the girls be satisfied with good, healthy Americans, 
'n let these foreigners alone? They always have lots o' wives off in En- 
rope, 'n the Yankee girls 't marry 'em (the barons — not their wives) get 
badly left, don't they ? There's a reg'lar fraud agoin' round now, playin' 
a racket on medals, decorations, friendships with crowned heads, 'n so 
forth. Wonder how long he'll last! It's 'bout time for the Mission widow 
to be heard from. She generally has one or more tourists in tow, playin' 
'tender" to 'em. That Bridges affair was pretty tryin' to her 'n the 
Sweetapples; but la tne! even if they'd been sour apples, 'twarnt a cir- 
cumstance to the apples o* discord 't the Baron's left right in the bosoms 
o' families. They say 't a divorced (or separated, no one knows exactly 
which she is) woman down to Monterey, feels kind o' bad, an' a family 'ts 



been dinin' an' winiu' him most every week or so don't knt.w what to do 
now 't the favored guest 's gone up a flume. The Judge says 'ts a case o' 
Weiss tsnicht — leastways that's what they say when you ask what's be- 
come o' the Baron. I was real sassy to the old Judge when he said so, 
'n aired my German by sayiu', "I'll tack on another word, an' ask you, 
Judge, why, then, a certain gentleman's feelins 'd be described?" Want 
I glad 't the old man had to give it up ? (You see, Dutch ain't his strong 
suit). " Well, then," says I. "the missin' word is Zafricdcn" I guess 
that's 'bout the size o' most o' tue friends o' the "dear departed." What 
do you say? Mac. 

We call oar readers' attention to Mme. Waldow Cohen's advertise- 
ment. This lady is considered one of the finest and most reliable teach- 
ers in the State. Her pupils are all finished players. 

Poison Oak. — Oak-poisoning is caused by the absorption of the vola- 
tile acid of the plant by the skin. Camelline for the complexion will 
prevent this result. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE^ 

New Basil Consolidated travel Mining- Company.- Location 
of principal place of bupinesy, San Francisco, California. Location of works, 
Placer county, California. Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the ■ 
Directors, held on the 9th day of July, 1884, an assessment of Five (Ji) Cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable immediately 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 525 Commercial street, San Francisco, 
California. 
Any stuck upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Monday, the 19tb Day of August, 1884, 

Will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is 

made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the !lth day of September, 18S4, to pay 

the delinquent assessment, togethe. with cost of advertising ami expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board ot Directou F. X. SIMON, Secretary 

[ tuly 12. J 525 Coan.creial street, San Francisco, Cglifornia. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

CHOIXAR MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 14 

Amount per Share 60 Cents 

Levied July 23d, 1884 

Delinquent in Office August 26th, 1SS4 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 16th, 18S1 

C. L. McCOY, Secretary. 
Office— Koo m 73, Nevada lilo^k, No . 30fl Montgome ry street. San Francisco, Cat. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Office of tne Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. -The an- 
nual meeting; of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works 
will be held on MONDAY, August 4th, 1881, at 11a.m., at the office of the com- 
pany, southeast comer of Beale and Howard streets, Sah Francisco, For the election 
of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business as may 
come before the meeting. [July 26.] L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

BEST & BELCHER MINING COMPANY. 

Assessment No. 30 

Amount per Share Fifty Cents 

Levied July 9th, 1884 

Delinquent in Office August 14th, 1834 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2d, 1884 

WM. WILLIS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving and Loan Society, 619 Clay street. (Incorporated 
July 23, 1857.)— For the six months ending June 30, 1884, the Board of Directors 
declared a dividend on all deposits at the rate of four and thirty-three and one- 
third (4 33.J-100) percent, per annum, free of taxes, payable on ami after Julv 1, 18S4. 
[June 28.] CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 

REMOVAL.-THE "ALTA CALIFORNIA" PRINTING HOUSE, 

The Oldest Established Book and Job Printing House in the City, 
HAS BEHOVED FROM ITS OLD QUARTERS. OPPOSITE, 

— TO — 

523 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Where it has Purchased the Stock and Good-will of W. T. BAGGETT & CO., the 
" Law Journal" Printing House. 
By this consolidation and increase of material we are still better enabled to turn 
out WORK RAPIDLY, EFFICIENTLY AND CHEAPLY. 

W. A. WOODWARD & CO. 

ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French, German and English Day and Boarding-School for 
Young Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Term commenced July 17, 1884. Address MME. B. ZEITSKA, 
[July 19.] Principal. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STREET. CORNER POLK. 

Prof*. O. A. liimi respectfully nunoiiuces that his new Acad- 
emy, 1328 Bush street, is now open for Juvenile and Evening Classes. Office 
Hours, for Term's, etc., 10 a. m. to 12 si., and 1 to 5 p m. Feb. 9. 

Miss Traver and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 



Number of pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue. 



May 3. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction in Price: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 60 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second at. Jan. 12. 

L. LANS2WEERT, 

Analytical and Consulting Chemist, 360 Fonrtb street, 
San Fraucisco. July 7. 



Au,. 



CALIFORNIA Ah\ EBTI8ER 



Ifl 



CRADLE. ALTAR AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

n, ■ doOghUr, 

VmAMU i v Franklin, a ...ii. 

;i . - .i» 

■ 
Smith I . >, m u.. . daughter. 

>\ i Btatrp, 
ii.« , loth* wife ..| II Sommarflold, ■ daughter. 

ALTAR. 

llj A. Baiter. 
CVIfSlVOlUM July *J. Tli.nnu A. Lord u. Jennie Cunningham 
n Short t.. Noi ; 

Jul] SSd.bj ii.' Rt, it* ^ . Bishop Kip, Prank L Wildes 
and Edith Pattoo. 

TOMB. 

iniu B. uvu, aged SI years, 8 months tnd ."■ days. 
B i _ I i- yoara, months and 13 days. 

Fuaaraa ra, ft months and 6 days. 

Jam— J jl i '.:■: i: ' . . '.I nms 

. i ■■.',l,i 

KA>t.i>-July M, Charles B. Rankin, aged 16 years, 3 months and 10ds>s. 

Walker— July 24, William Adolf Walker, aged 3i years and h months. 
Watkrs -July z:-, ThomM P. Waters, a Dative ..f Ireland, aged M >> um 



SAMPLE FABLES. 

A favorite flip-flap, tiini.'l by the poor clowns who tumble through 
the columns of the American press, U the invention of pointless faMes, 
couched in witless phrase. If these tilings are really vendible we should 

I to supply several royal octavo volumes of them, as per sample 
tot below, .it tour cents per fable in job-lots, or four fables for a cent to 
parties taking a quantity. 

PaBLI I. A vampire but, who perceived several ant-eaters coiled in a 
knot for protection and warmth, approached the group and maliciously 
poison into their ears. A monkey, who had overseen the deed, 
hastened bo narrate the transaction to a Notary. "Alas ! " exclaimed tbu 
Notary, " why an 1 not a poet, that I might weave this tragedy into a 
paragraph!" This fable shows that a belief in the immortality of the 
soul may alleviate, but cannot cure, soft cornB. 

FABLR II. A spider, who had retired to the center of her web for med- 
itation, was annoyed by the din proceeding from a neighboring black- 
smith's forge. Approaching the smith she said to him, in a cold manner: 
"Friend, your vocation is to make horseshoes, which you then sell. Where- 
fore do you also make noises which bring you in no remuneration?" The 
smith disregarded the remark. This fable teaches that the pricks of con- 
science may be allayed by flannel worn next the skin. 

FaBLI III. A butterfly meeting an eagle, as they sailed past the brow 
of a beetling cliff, addressed him in a flippant manner, saying, " How su- 
perior is the condition of us winged creatures to that of the mammals, 
such as we behold groveling below there." *'Sir, or madam, as the case 
may be," replied the Eagle, "not every lady who wears slippers of glass 
knows the due proportion of ingredients in a rum punch." This fable 
teaches that a soft answer turneth away the wrath to come. 

Fable IV. A young trout, who was lying beneath the root of a tree 
in. a deep pool, beheld a fisherman on the bank refreshing himself from a 
pocket flask, and remarked to his mother: "That person strikes me as a 
philanthropist; I will ask him to bestow on us an alms." "Judge not 
by appearances, n replied the more experienced h'sh. " Beneath the gaher- 
dine of a philanthropist there may beat the heart of an ichthyologist." 
Moral: Though thorns line the path of virtue, they are not meritorious 
in clear soup. 

SOME NEW GEOGRAPHY. 

Of what is the surface of the earth composed ? 

Of corner lots, mighty poor roads, railroad tracks, baseball-grounds, 
Cricket-fields and skating rinks. 

What portion of the globe is water? 

About three-fourths. Sometimes they add a little gin and nutmeg to it. 

What is a town ? 

A town is a considerable collection of bouses and inhabitants, with four 
our rive men who " run the party" and lend money at 15 percent, interest. 

What is a city? 

A city is an incorporated town, with a Mayor, who believes that the 
whole world shakes when he happens to fall flat on a cross-walk. 

What is commerce? 

Borrowing §5 for a day or two, and dodging the lender for a year or two. 

Name the different races. 

Horse race, boat race, bicycle race and racing around to rind a man to 
endorse your note. 

Into how many classes is mankind divided? 

Six: being enlightened, civilized, half-civilized, savage, too utter, not 
worth a ceut, and Indian agents. 

What nations are called enlightened ? 

Those which have the most wars and the worst laws, and produce the 
worst criminals. 

How many motions has the earth ? 

That's according to how you mix your drinks and which way you 
go home. 

What is the earth's axis ? 

The lines passing between New York and San Francisco. 

What causes day and night ? 

Day is caused by night getting tired out. Night is caused by every- 
body taking the street-cars and going home to supper. 

What is a map ? 

A map is a drawing to show the jury where Smith aloud when Jones 
gave him a lift under the eye. 

What is a mariner's compass? 

A jug holding four gallons. 



Some time ago tl. fact became that I I 

tb« wtd mber f. i Sh< Hti Id, «. n h 

DO from 

inty Fund uu the uud< i -t mdln th d an ad 

' h whlofa to i tiv foi it., in. Mi \l ii 

M P., in 1. ii i in Sh.Mu-l.l t-.ok U| 

""I » '■■' I \l| ;,| l\ , 

upon ths [ulnl llvei ol ths ladles vol bwUI field them KIM k 6\L 
per annum, a small bal u 

The management of ths Uadiaoo Square Theatre, New York, has 
aed an exquisite photograph souvenir in commeox ration 
ode hundredth performance nl Mr. Belaacos drama, " M 
whiok took place on M lay. July :M, 1884, Ths souvenir i- a very neat 

and tasteful production. 



Grand Concert Saturday afterno at Golden Gate Park. 

McAllister street or Height-street cable cars. No • h 

GRAVES' LEDGER INDEX. 



r«k« 



HOPPER'S WRITING TABLET. 

STAFFORP'S INKS. 

AllKltlCAX 71(H)/.- EXCIIAXI1 /.' IT II 1. 1 III I (>\ S. 

C A R E W PAPERS. 

CUNNINGHAM, OURTISS & WELCH, 

Corner Sansome and Sacramento streets, 
(Sept. 28.) San Francisco. 

COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA. 

This institution, offering peculiar advantages to Young Ladies wishing to i celvi 
a solid and refined education, was founded in 1851. In 1855 it was incorporated by 
the State Legislature, ami subsequently the same body mo extended the original 
charter as to confer all the rights and privileges of collegiate InBtltUtlollB. 

[t occupies Large Buildings, with Extensive Play-Grounds, and possesses even- 
thing to make science familiar and attractive. The course of instruction in thorough 
in all the departments. Every facility will he afforded to students who may find it 
desirable to devote their whole attention to Music or the Studj Of the Languages, 

The Scholastic Year Begins on the First Monday in August, and 
Closes about the First Week in June. Pupils are Received at Any 

Period of the Year. 

TERMS: Per Quarter, Payable In Advance. 

Board, Tuition in English, French, and if deshed, Spanish, German, Latin ami 

Washing, aud Use of Bedding $76 CO 

Drawing, jier Quarter. '■ 00 

Painting, in Water Colors 00 

Pointing;, In Oil, per Lesson 1 00 

Vocal and Instrument'! I Music form Extra Charges. 

For further particulars address, COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME, San Joso. 



EMPIRE 



SAVAGE, SON & CO., 

FOUNDRY AND MACHINE WORKS 
i Jos. 135 to 143 Fremont street, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

Manufacturers of STEAM ENGINES, SAWMILL MACHINERY, CABLE-ROAD 

CASTINGS, QUARTZ-WORK and ARCHITECTURAL IRON G lODd. 

&2j~ Estimates Free. August 'J, 

MME. WAL00W-C0HEN, 

SINGING AND PIANOFORTE TEACHER, 
507 Hyde street. August 2, 

SKIN DISEASES CUBED IN A FEW DAYS.— BULPHOLINE LOTlox Re- 
moves Eruptions, Pimples, Redness, Blotches, Scurf, in a few days, is higBly 
successful in Eczema, Psoriasis, Prurigo, Tetter, etc. It totally destroys many deep' 

seated, inveterate skin affections Most agreeable to use. In Great Britain SUL- 
PlioLINE is the one Skin Rem edy. 

SULPHOLINK LOTION.-ANY ONE. HOWEVER DEEPLY AND APPAR- 
ently hopelessly afflicted with Skin Disease, should apply SULPHOLINE as 
quickly as possible. In two or three days the effect will become evident in a dimin- 
ished appearance of the malady, a growing tendency to fade away, and complete 
obliteration of the eruption. Sold everywhere by chemists, etc. 

SULPHOLINE LOTION.— AS A REMEDY FOR PIMPLES, BLOTCHES, RED- 
ness, Rashes, Blemishes, Spots, Roughness, Discoloration, Ei zema, Rosea, Pi- 
tyriasis, Prickly Heat, Salt Rheum, Scurf and General Irritability of the Skin, SUL- 
PHOLINE acts like a marvel. None of these eruptions can withstand It. The 
LOTION attacks them all by some depurative action, and brings the skin out clear 
and healthy. SULPHOLINE is beautifully fragrant. Made only by JOHN' PEPPER 
& CO., London, England. 

Sold, by WABIEL.EE & CO., Montgomery and Bush streets, 
San Francisco. 

LIVER I'lLLS.-DR. KING'S LIVER PILLS. THE GREAT ENGLISH MED- 
icine. Established 70 years. 

LIVER P1LLS.-DR. KING'S LIVEIt PILLS, CONTAINING DANDELION 
and Quinine, without Mercury, a^e far above all others as the surest, mildest 
and best means of removing obstructions and irregularities of Hie Liver and Stom- 
ach, Headache, Biliousness, Shoulder Pains, Imliu" -tion, Const! at'on, Flatulence, 
Torpidity, so insuring perfect health. DR. KING'S PILLS are sold everywhere. 
Kept byWAKEL^.E & CO., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 2, 1884 



PARIS AND FASHION. 

[Correspondence of "S. F. News Letter," by a Paris Lady of Fashion..] 

June 23th, 1884.— It is an error to thinkthat there is no Society in 
Paris during the Summer. Spring and Summer — at least till August — are 
the best seasons to see and eDJoy Paris. There is always something go- 
ing on there to amuse all classes, from the highest to the lowest. I have 
lived many years in Paris, without ever once leaving it, even for the sea- 
side, l have never regretted remaining all the year round in my own 
home, instead of following my friends to Trouville, Vichy, Spa, or wher- 
ever else they thought 6t to emigrate. They generally return to town, 
bemoaning the expense of their trip, and how they enunye'd themselves 
in the bargain, whilst I look prettier than they, and have saved myself 
all tbe annoyances and expense of traveling 1 , and have enjoyed myself in 
the bargain. I think, therefore, that I am justified in singing the praises 
of " Summer in Paris." Paris, you know, though large in extent, has a 
comparatively small circle of society, and if you know the right days you 
may be sure of meeting tbe same people of your own class wherever you 
may go. One day they all go to the Salon, where they do not dream of 
looking at the pictures, you know ; but sit in the gardens, converted into 
a Sculpture Gallery, where a band of music is always playing. Well, 
you sit there all the afternoon, till your seat becomes the center of a coterie 
as amusing — nay, more so — as any drawing-room can ever be. Another 
day you meet the same friends at the Cirque, where the real world is quite 
separated from the demi and quarter worlds. They are all equally elegant 
in dress, and each world, may be, may copy the others ; but there is a 
stamp ou each which no dressmaker's art can remove. It is funny to see 
these two or three worlds eye each other through their glasses. Pride and 
arrogance triumph on one side ; defiance, mincl^d with a tinge of sadness, 
lurks on the lips and in the eyes of tbe other. Each side envies the other, 
however, the one for one reason and the other for another. Two nights 
iu the week are devoted to the beau monde, by the opera and the Theatre- 
Francais, which are open all through the year ; and finally, there are 
open air concerts in the gardens at the back of the Palais de L'Industrie, 
at which only the elite of society congregate on certain nights. You see, 
therefore, that every day and evening of the week is devoted to some par- 
ticular entertainment, at which the same class seem to be tbe only and 
exclusive public, and at which the other classes are rarely ever seen, these 
preferring to be by themselves just as much as the higher classes do. 
For the present, also, there are enough private parties to satisfy the most 
inveterate pleasure hunter or huntress. Parties, balls and picnics (or Rob- 
insons, as they are here called) succeed each other in happy and rapid suc- 
cession. It has become the fashion now to spread rose-leaves over dinner 
and supper tables, quite in Ancient Roman style. We shall next come 
to crowning overselves with roses, as the Ancients did to preserve them- 
selves from the effects of intoxication. The English fashion, also, of sup- 
ping at little tables, like at a public restaurant, is gaining ground in Paris. 
We have here a way of beginning to turn everything English into ridi- 
cule, and then finish by adopting everything English to our own use, 
when we think it exquisite — because we do it. This is a peculiarity of 
the Parisian character. 

The celebrated Pasdeloup had a complimentary benefit, the other day, 
on the occasion of his retirement into private life. It was he who intro- 
duced classic morning-concerts into Paris, and ruined himself in the un- 
dertaking. Parisians are not fond of classic music ; they do not under- 
stand it. All the greatest singers and musicians in Paris lent their aid to 
this concert. Only Miss Van Zandt was absent. She was not well, it is 
said. But this little lady is giving herself so many airs that she is grow- 
ing quite unpopnlar with the general public. G-ounod crowned Pasdeloup 
with a wreath of roses and pinks, and thanked bim for his thirty years 
services to art, About 100,000 francs were made by the concert, Roths- 
child, Faure and others having paid fabulous sums for their places. The 
poor old conductor, therefore, will not die of hunger. 

The most charming /ete of this Summer, however, was the Princess of 
Sagan's village-party. Only the cream of the cream of Paris Society was 
invited, and every one was compelled to wear some country costume. You 
may imagine the affect of this. All the sheperdesses of the most celebrated 
painters were revived for tbe occasion, and all the most noted costumes of 
French peasantry were copied. Most of the ladies adopted the costumes 
of their own country places. Tbe Normandy costume was a blue serge 
skirt, bound with velvet and a square velvet bodice, over a white chemi- 
sette, a bib-apron and a large lace cape. Small wooden shoes on the feet. 

A celebrated viscountess was dressed as a market-woman selling eggs. 
A marchioness, equally celebrated for her grace and beauty, was dressed 
as a keeper of geese. Many adopted watteau costumes. The beautiful 
Marchioness St. Denis looked lovelier than ever dressed as a beggar-maid, 
tit to win another monarch's heart. Her dress was a patchwork of rags; 
but what made the beauty of the dress was her golden hair, which fell 
disheveled over her shoulders like a lovely mantle. Then there were 
reapers and gardeneresse3 and Alsaticnnes and Louis XV. paysannes, etc., 
etc. The weather being: tine, supper was served in the garden, picnic fash- 
ion, and nothing could be prettier than the sight of all these aristocratic 
ladies and gentlemen playing at being country villagers, with liveried 
servants waiting on them. Another party, which I must not forget to 
mention, was the ball that the Duchess de la Rochefoucauld gave in honor 
of the Orleans family. The duchess, who was dressed in white satin cov- 
ered with lace, received tbe Orleans princes and princesses at the foot of 
the State Staircase. In the front hall there were eighteen valets in red 
livery, forming a passage for the princes. This was done as a traditional 
custom of the family. The whole first floor of the mansion was laid out 
in ball-rooms. 

Supper was served on the ground floor, and on little tables, as is now 
the fashion. All the old family silver was brought out on this occasion. 
The Duchess of Cbartres wore, as she generally does, a Louis XV. cos- 
tume, composed of a cherry-colored satin skirt, covered with three 
flounces of gold lace, and a body and panier-train of Pompadour brocade of 
pale blue. The bodice was pointed back and front, and was cut square 
at the neck, where it was trimmed with gold lace. Around the neck a 
ruching of cherry satin studded with diamonds, and in the hair a feather 
aigrette, fastened on with diamonds. 

Her daughter, the Princess Mary, was dressed in white tulle, this be- 
ing her first ball. High, full body, over a low silk lining — no ornaments. 
The generality of tbe other dresses was white. White foulard, white 
crape, white tulle, white lace, looped up with flowers, or velvet ribbons, 



mostly red, green, or orange in color. The bottom of the skirts were 
richly trimmed with puffings or ruchings, and the upper skirts were 
arranged as shawls, or scarfs, crossing over each other in front and form- 
ing cascades of ends at the back. All light materials are made with full 
bodices— quite in old style — or have gatherings in front to imitate full 
bodies. Black lace dresses are as much worn as ever and are always be- 
coming and lady-like on all occasions. 

Parasols are made like dresses, of flounced lace over colored silk. Crape 
parasols, over colored silk, are also worn. Red is a favorite color for 
parasols. It is so becoming to tbe face. 

High heels are no longer fashionable for boots and shoes. Cinderella 
slippers are worn for full dress, and Goldsmith shoes for walking. Colored 
stockings are still fashionable, and are as richly embroidered as ever. 
They should always match the color of the dress. 

Swedish kid and silk gloves are the only gloves worn now. They are 
still very long, but not worn over the sleeves — only under them. The 
waists of dresses are both long and short — long for pointed bodices, and 
short for full bodices. With short-waisted full bodices very wide bands 
and scarfs are worn round the waist. Perfectly plain skirts are coming 
into fashion; but of these another time. I have already gossiped too 
long. Madame De St. D s. 



Young Men!— Read TdIs.—The Voltaic Belt Co., of Marshall, 
Mich., offer to send their celebrated Electho-Voltaic Belt and other 
Electrical Appliances nn trial for thirty days, to men (young or old) 
afflicted with nervous debility, loss of vitality and manhood, and all kin- 
dred troubles. Also for rheumatism, neuralgia, paralysis and many oth- 
er diseases. Complete restoration to health, vigor and manhood guaran- 
teed. No risk is incurred, as thirty days' trial is allowed. Write them 
at once for illustrated pamphlet free. 

GEO. STREET, A.gent News Letter, 30 Gornhill, E. C, London. 

I^big^omTany^s" 

EXTRACT 

OF MEAT. 

Annua] Sale, 

8,000,000 Jars. 

Finest and Cheapest 
Meat -Flavoring Stock 
for Soups, Made Dishes 
and Sauces. 

CAUTION.— Genuine ONLY with the fac simile of BARON LIEBIG'S Signature in 
Blue Ink acro-s Label. The title " BARON LIEBIG " and his photograph having 
been lately largely used by dealers having no connection with BAKON LIEBIG, the 
public are hereby informed that the LIEBIG COMPANY are the only manufacturers 
who are able to offer the article with BARON LIEBIG'S guarantee 'uf genuineness. 

An invaluable and palatable tonic in all cases of weak digestion and debility. 

" Is a success and a boon for which Nations should feel grateful." — See Medical 
Press, Lancet, British Medical Journal, etc. 

To be bad of all Storekeepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole Agents for the United 
States (wholesale only), C. DAVID & CO., 9 Fenchurch Avenue, London, England. 

Sold Wholesale by RICHAEDS & HARRISON, San Francisco. 




BLAINE 



Agents wanted for authen- 
tic edition of his life. Pub- 
lished at Augusta, his 
home. Largest, handsomest, cheapest, best. 
By the renowned historian and biographer, Col. 
Comvell, whose life of Garfield, published by 
us, outsold the twenty others by 80,000. Out- 
sells every book ever published in this world; 
many agents are selling fifty daily. Agents 
are making fortunes. All new beginners suc- 
cessful; grand chance for them; $43 ou made 
by a lady agent the first day. Terms most lib- 
eral. Particulars free. Better send 25 cents 
for postage, etc., on free outfit, now ready, 
including large prospectus book, and save 
valuab'e time." 

ALLEN & CO., Augusta, Maine. 



CONTRACT FOR FALL AND WINTER SUPPLY OF COAL! 

FOB YOUE HOUSE OR STOKE. 

Special Rates for Five Tone. Prices Furnished on Application. 



CHAS. R. ALLEN, 
120 Beale street. 



Telephone 308. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

MAJfTMZS and GRATES, SLOUVMENTS and MBA BSTOKES, 
In Marble and Scotch Granite, 

827 Market street bet. Fourth and Fifth. 

Kg* Send for Desiqns and Prices. W. H. MeCOUMICK. 



SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold. Silver and Lead Ores and Sulphurets. Manufac- 
turers of BLUESTONE. Also, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot, etc. This Company 
has the best facilities ou the Coast for working GOLD, SILVER and LEAD in their 
various forms. 

June 18. PRENTISS SELBY, Superintendent. 

JAMES G. STEELE & CO., 

DRUGGISTS AND CHEMISTS, 

Agents for RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PTT.T.S, 

«35 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 

PALACE HOTEL. June 24. 



Aug S L884 



iWl.lFOKNIA ADVERTISK1L 



17 



NOTABILIA. 



THE PEDDLERS SONG. 



Lftwn im white a* <tri\ en mow ; 
Cvpras black *» o'er *»» mm ; 
uWm m awtjei an damask rosea ; 
■ faces .nd f..r i RiftM ; 
. .ii-i, necklaro, unbar ; 
IVrfumv lor a lady's ehtmbtf ; 



Mi|<aatul stomacher*, 
For m> Ltd lr dean; 

Pn nt anil i uf ateul, 

Wtr.il inaitL* lack (run head to heel : 
Cuinobm "' ""'. < "iin- ;r. >uic 1'iiy, conic buy, 
Boj , lade, or else row lanea crj 

\VlLLIAM SUAKSmaHB. 



Two Tanglc-Halrcd Darlings. 
A awd of tangled wllnw hair, 

Blue eye* brimful of fun, 
A hoe that's mora than passing fair — 

Behold our itarlioi,' one. — Lilla W. Cushman. 
A lot of yellow tangled hair, 

A Titian shade so-called; 
She Ikwu's it deftly on a chair, 

Behold our darling— bald. — Evansrillc AfffUt. 
Bnrnum is Mid to be anxious to secure a boating party which will re- 
turn without ringing " Home Again,*' or a houBokeeper who lias ever en.- 
the Ber vioes ot Heave. J. SpauldiogA Oo., of the Pioneer Steam 
Oarpet*beating and Renovating Works, Nos, 353 and 355 Tehama street, 
San Fnncieoo, aud been diasatisfied with the result. This firm has the 
xiilv machine on the coast which beuts carpets exclusively on the back. 

The oxerclso of careful ignorance is safer than the promptings of 
reckless geniua. However, as there is very little genius of any kind the 
country is comparatively safe; but, ladies and gentlemen, who can ap- 
preciate the good things of life, will do well to bear iu mind that delicious 
Innches, i<« creams, confections, pastries, eta, can always be obtained at 
Swain 1 *, No. 313 Sutter street. 

A merchant In Berlin, having fallen in love with an opera singer, pur- 
chased two dresses and sent them to her to make ber choice, saying he 
would call to know her derision. Shortly, however, before the hour he 
had intended to set out on his errand, the merchant received from his be- 
loved a hilltt doux to the following effect: " Of the dresses you have sent 
me 1 like one ignite as well as the other. I will, in fact, keep both, so 
that you will have no need to call.'' 

An Eastern family received a telegram from the \Akst announcing the 
sudden demise of a relative, and they replied, "Send ah the remains at 
once." No telegram was received in answer, but in a few days a letter 
came saying simply: "There aint no remains. He wos kicd by a mul. 
But he left his pictur. which wos tuck by Bradley & Rulofson, Geary and 
Dupont streets, San Francisco, and is the very image of hiaself." 

Blaine, who is itching to be President, objects to scratching. Scratch- 
ing, he says, is a hen trick, and be does not want Hendricks on his ticket. 
He concedes, however, that the Imperishable Paint, sold by J. K. Kelly 
& Co., Market street, San Francisco, and which can be purchased already 
mixed ami ready for use, goes further than other paints, and is perfectly 
impervious to sun or rain. 

Recently a party of young men from Bethlehem were out on an excur- 
sion t<> Bower's Rock, in Salisbury. While passing along one of the party 
espied two farmer ^'irls churning butter. Thinking they would havesome 
fun the Bethlehemites stepped up to the gate, when the following collo- 
quy ensued: "Hey, ladies, will you be kind enough to give us some but- 
termilk?" "Not to-day; we feed our buttermilk to our own calves," 
was the reply. — Bethlehem Times. 

" No, Augustus," she said, shaking her head with a photographic neg- 
ative firmness, " I cannot marry you." " But I love you so very much," he 
pleaded. " I cannot help that, sir. I cannot marry any man who wears 
a paper collar when the thermometer is at ninety in the shade, aud who 
doesn't know that the most stylish Hats are to be found at White's, No. 
614 Commercial street." 

Smithcrs says it is rheumatism, but it isn't. It is the result of having 
in an unguarded moment offered to " boost " the girls at the picnic swing, 
and being kept at it for six mortal hours while the other fellows drank up 
the whole supply of pure and unadulterated Liquors which had been ob- 
tained from P. J. Cassin & Co., Washington aud Battery streets. This 
firm supplies families in retail quantities afc wholesale rates. 

A Burlington girl has a diary devoted entirely to noting down the 
visits of her beau, which, it is said, she calls her court docket. When she 
is arraigned for trifling with men's hearts it will only be necessary to pro- 
duce this " court docket " to prove that she is jilty. 

The most deadly foe to all malarial diseases is Ayer's Ague Cure, a 
combination of vegetable ingredients only, of which the most valuable is 
used in no other known preparation. This rerredy is an absolute and cer- 
tain specific, and succeeds when all other medicines fail. A cure is war- 
ranted. 

Boncutl possesses healing and soothing qualities which adapt it to both 
old aud young. For babies there is nothing else equal to it. The tender 
skin of infants is often injured by the caustic qualities of common soaps. 

The most beautiful girl we ever knew was a Stock Yards miss, who 
blushed from the roots of ber hair down to the extremities of her toes on 
being asked if she had been wooing the rosy god of sleep. She said she 
had never courted a man in all her born days. — Chicago Sun. 

The curative power of Ayer's Sarsaparilla is too well known to re- 
quire the specious aid of any exaggerated or fictitious certificate. Wit- 
nesses of its marvelous cures are to-day living in every city and hamlet of 
the land. Write for names if you want home evidence. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. This celebrated Whisky is for sale by 
all first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

A Pennsylvania man fell dead a few days ago while kneeling in front 
of the sofa. He was probably looking for his slippers, and the shock of 
finding that his wife had left them where he put them caused his death. 

Beat Pictures taken at the Imperial Gallery, 724i Market St., S. F. 

John Middleton— Coal— 14 Post st., and NE. cor. Geary and Mason. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Beoorded t a the City and County of San Francisco California for 
the Week, ending: July 26. 1884. 

Cimpilt 'rotntht HtctiriUqftlu Commercial .4.</mi<-i/,-H11 California HI., S.K 



Tuesday. July 22nd. 



ORANTOlt ANLl UIUNTKK. 



DKKCUIIT1UN. 



Same to A Farnlncher 

same to II I Enaelniann . 
Same to Patk Casey 



Same to Michl Lynch 

Same to Chas G Swing 

Suml Molt'att to Michelo Pernsso.. 
\V 11 Robertson to Ann Robertson 
La Soc Franchise to II Abraham.. 
Jag F Rock to II Eckmann 



Win II Martin toC Hachinehlcr.. 'Nw Bryant. 85 ne 3rd. ne 28:9x80, being 

in IOD-vara80 

No 8rd, 80 iiw Bryant, nil v.'ixss, being 

in 100 .vara Bfi 

K corner 3rd and silver, h IB 

inn In loo-viira 86 

Sc Silver, 142:0 tie .Til. in- 2:1:9x75 -100- 

vara 85 

Same to J II A Kurt/. i N corner Bryant and 3rd, nw 30x85 - 

lint-vara So 

Be Silver, 85 ne 3rd, ne SS:9x7.\ being 

In 100-varas5 

Nw Bryant, Haiti ne 3rd,ne 57:0x80— 

100-vara 85 . 

W Duponl, 06:0 i. Filbert, e 41:10x97:0 

50-vara -120 .... 

Sw church and II 111. w 50:10x114, being 

in M Block 

Sw O'Fartell and Octavln, s 1211x1.17:0 

W A 203 

Sc Clementina, 127:0 ne 6lh, ne 20x80 - 

100-vara 280 - 



rnica 



f.,85" 
3,2511 
1.M1I 
1,050 
0,000 
1,050 
5,700 
7,200 
Hill 

15,000 
2.800 



Wednesday, July 23rd. 



Margt M Savage elal to R Coulter. 
Richd II O'Uara to Thou Ncvin.. 
Jno J Riechenbach to R n Weber. 
Jno L Ilaekell to E M Jones ct al. 
E H Gallagher to Ellen Von Glahn 
Jae T Uogan to R A Swain 



A Mecartney to M C Miller.. 
CW Miller to Same 



Owen Hackett to Robt Lavcry 

W G Jobson et al to Same 



Se Oak and Lyon, e 55:2x137:0, being 

In W A597 

K Sleveiison, 10 6 10th, 8 25x80, being 

in M 1107 

W Larkin, 75 a Lombard, s 25x105:9— 

w Addition 

Se Howard, 275 sw 4th, sw 53:4x155-- 

— 100-vara 139 

Se 14th anil Minna, c 25x80, being in 

M Block 

S Jackson, 13o:6 e Webster, o 50:0x127: 

0-W A2tiS 

Se Hyde and Green, e 3x137:0 

E Hyde. 3 s Green, s 74x07:0, being in 

50-vara 1292 

Sw 2nd, 81:3 se Branuan, so 25x80 -100 

vara 109 

Sw New Anthony, 188:0 nw MlBsion, 

nw 80:0x50—100 vara 5 



83,075 
1,125 
1,250 



5 
5 

5 

2,100 

12,010 



Thursday. July 24th. 



S Schounasser to Babette Brown . 
Wm C Parker to W H Martin etal. 
Q M McLane to Adeline Shoemaker 

L Gottig to F Roeding et al 

F Roeding et al to Chas O Dean. . . 

Agnes Cooley to Geo A Mehn 

J D Stevenson to W H Martin 

W H Martin et al to Jno Monahan. 
Gostav A Scott to Jacob Goldberg 



N Post, 107:0 e Hyde, o 30x137:0, bein 
in 50-vnra 1209 

Nw Bryant, 117:6 ne 3rd, ne 20x80— 100- 
vara 85 

W Guerrero, 228 s 24th, 8 32x125, being 
in M Block 

S 21st. 50:10 w Church, w 101:10x114- 
M B 90 

S 31st, 50:10 w Guerrero, w 101:10x114 
-M B 90 

W 1st avenue 135 n 10th, n 30x1.0, be- 
ing in M B35 

Nw Bryant, 117:0 ne 3rd, ne 20x80— 100- 
vara 85 

Nw Bryant, 113:9 ne 3rd, ne 28:9x155- 
100-vara85 

N California, 59:6 w Larkin, w 27:0x87 
— W Addition 



10,000 

5 

4,500 

5 

1,300 

2,250 

5 

4.500 

4,000 



Friday, July 25th. 



Wm Sorensen to J Schulken 

John Uanlon to Peter Leu 

Elizth Paul to Jno W McKcnzio.. 
Eliza A Bloomer to Cyrus Cleaves. 

Peter Ash to Mary Sitterson 

Eugene Keller et al to Geo Monck 

Same to James Yonng 

Patk Lennehen to Mary Lennehen 
Julia H Grady to Cath G Sheldon. 



Undivided one-half ne McAllister and 
Lagunu.e 80x100 -W A 205 

Nw Natoma, 200 sw 8tb, sw 25x75-100 
vara 287 

E Leavenworth, 37:0 n Francisco, n 50 
100— 50-vara 1500 

W 20lh, 125 n A street, n 70x120—0 L 
Block 258 

E Howard, 175 s 24th, s 25x122:6, beiti' 
in M B 172 

S 25th, 75 w Hampshire, w 25x90, be- 
ing in M B 

W Hampshire, 90 s 25tb, 8 50x100, be- 
ing in M B 

Se Louisa, 502 ne 4th, ne 19:0x09-100 
vara 41 

S Clay, 113:6 e Kearny, w 21x61:3—50 
vara 23 



*7,n00 

3,500 

1,2110 

300 

Gift 

400 

000 

Gift 

11,200 



Saturday, July 26th. 



Nevada Bk of S F to Eliza Grosh. 
ChasGEwiugto Wm Miller 



Amy W Ver Mchr to F Lacoste S Geary, 178:9 e Buchanan, e 41:3x137:0 

-W A 230 

W Scott, 83 8 Sutter, s 27, w 137:0, n 

22:6. e 50, n 4:6, e 87:6 to beginning - 

WA457 

Se Silver, 314:6 BW 2nd, Bw 24:6X75 -100 

vara 80 

Francis L Such to Moses Hopkins Mission Block 11 

" E Valencia, 34:5 n 24th, n 25x90, being 

in MB 155 '. 5,600 

W Capp, 270 n 19th, n 30x122:6, being 

inMBIock 2,000 

W Stocklon, 27:6 n Jackson, n 27x40:6 

—50-vara 86 ; and lots 1024 to 1043, 

Gilt Map 2 3,500 

Se China avenue aud Naples street, Bw 

200x200 800 

E Ohio, 97:6 n Pacific, n 40x05, beini_ 

in 56-varn 196 150 

N Eddy, 111:0 o Larkin, e 25x137:6—50-1 

vara 1427 10,000 

S 27lh, 174 w Church, w 24x105, being 

iuU A 94 1 1,600 



J M Comorrord to G & A Schmidt, 
Mary Ryan to Cath Uildenbrand. 
Blanch Watrlgant to P Husson . . . 



F Buchanan to P Hanberry 

B Richardson to N Martinelli et al. 
Henry F Crane to Margt HarriB. . 
J M Comerford to Michl narris... 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER* AND 



Aug. 2, 1884 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 

Kitty Kent. By Julia A. Eastnnn. D. Lathrop & Co., Bo3ton. 

'J lis is number three of the Young Folks' Library Series. It is a sim- 
ple tale i >f the joys and sorrows which mark the lives of a number of 
young people, who grow to maturity in a small country town in the East- 
ern States. The simple incidents are woven together with sufficient dra- 
matic effect to bold the interest of the reader, aud every line is pregnant 
with lessons which are calculated to beneficially affect the young minds 
for whom the book is designed. It is not a Sunday-school book, with a 
tiresome array of people who are too good to live, aud others who are too 
bad to die. It has a decidedly religious tone, flavored with sufficient 
wurUliuess to make it readable. 

What Shall We Name It. By Mrs. M. J. Stockwell. John C. Stockwell 
New York. 

This is a collection, in dictionary form, of some two thousand baptis- 
mal names, with their meauing and deriviation. Married people are of- 
ten at their wits end for a name for their latest offspring. Names there 
are in plenty, but they have a faculty of keeping out of one's mind just at 
the time they are wanted, and, as a consequence, baby has to put up 
with a name which does not express the parents' taste. This little work 
will, therefore, fill, so to speak, a long felt want, although it is not by any 
means as complete as it might be. 

The Land. Question. What it. Involves, ami Btow Alone it Can bo Settled. By 
Harry George. John W. Lovell Company, New York. 

This little work is a very able defense of that nationalization of land 
theory of which Mr. George has become such a pronounced and distin- 
guished advocate. There is a prevailing impression in the popular mind 
to the effect that Mr. George is the originator of this theory. This im- 
pression, however, is erroneous. The theory is a good deal older than Mr. 
George, but there can be no doubt but that he has done more to popular- 
ize it than any other man. In the little work under review this now 
famous author devils powerful blows at the weak points in the prevailing 
land system, but beyond the bald aud sterile cry, " Nationalize the land," 
he suggests no remedy for the wrongs he points out. We all know that 
an unskilled laborer can pull down a wall, but it takes a skilled artisan to 
build it up. In siying this there is no intention of disparaging Mr. 
George's unquestionable Abilities; but before asking society to disorganize 
itself, to practically destroy a large portion of the foundation upon which 
it rests, he should exert himself to show in detail what the results of that 
step will be, aud how any or all of their objectionable features may be 
modified or prevented. This is the work he should apply himself to. We 
all know that there are weak spots in the present system, but we do not 
all know of a better one, and how t<> put it in operation. To cry " Na- 
tionalize the laud," like a parrot, is foolish. To let us know how this 
can be done without destroying the social fabric would be sensible. 



JEWISH GENIUS FOR MUSIC. 

Who composed "II Barbiere?" Rossini, a Jew. Who is there 
that admires not the heart-stirring music of the " Huguenots " and the 

"Prophet?" The composer is Meyerbeer, a Jew. Who has not been 
spellbound by " La Jueve," by Halevy, a Jew? The King of Opera 
Bouffe, Offenbach— he was a Jew. That master of all masters on the violin, 
Paganinni, also comes from Jewish stock. Who has not been enchanted 
with the beautiful fictions of lyric poetry, and charmed with the graceful 
melodies, so to speak, of one of Israel's sweetest singers, Heimich Heine, 
a Jew? Who has not listened with breathless ecstasy to the music of 
the "Midsummer Night's Dream," " Elijah," " Paul and Stephen ?" Do 
you ask who created those wonderful harmonies? Felix Mendelssohn 
Bartholdy, who also was a Jew. Julian, the great leader, with his per- 
fect band, was a Jew. Aud so we could swell the list ad infinitum; and 
little do our meu and women of fashion, as they thrill into raptures at 
the notes of a Patti or Gerster, suspect that ofttimes they are offering 
homage to the sweet singers of Israel. 



Persons who have a little money to invest should not forget the sale of 
choice Fruit Lands, which is announced to take place at Hay wards, Ala- 
meda, on August lOth. Whether it be for the purpose of establishing 
;t comfortable country home, or for speculative purposes, the lauds could 
not be excelled, and public atteotion should be directed to them. Messrs. 
Taggart & Dinge-. Nos. -jr.0 and 462 Kighth street, Oakland, aud Easton 
& Eldridge, No. 22 Montgomery street, San Francisco, will supply all 
further information. There will also be a sale of the stock, implements, 
etc., now on the place. 

A veritable hansom cab has been seen for the first time on the 
streets of San Francisco, during the past week, and has been attracting a 
great deal of attention. These vehicles are handy aud excessively com- 
fortable. They are favorite means of transportation in other great cities, 
aud the wonder is that they have not been introduced here before. The 
one to which we are referring was importer? by Messrs. Blum, Bppatein 
& Marsh, of Kearny street, and it is a beautiful specimen of carriage- 
building. 

Messrs. J. M. Litchfield & Co., the well known Military and Mer- 
chant Tailors, No. 415 Montgomery street, continue to keep on hand a 
full stock of the very besr. materials and to employ the most expert cut- 
ters and workmen. Military, Society, and Gents' Furnishing Goods, in 
tin- largest variety, are kept on hand or manufactured by this tirm. Per- 
fect tits and complete satisfactiou guaranteed. 



The George Goulet Champagne is a inaguificent, sparkling, aromatic 
wine, which has only to be tried in order to be appreciated. It is to be 
found upon all well-appojnted tables, and is the drink of the elite. Alfred 
Greenebaum & Co., 123 California street, are the sole agents for it on the 
Pacific Coast. 

If you want to get the most stylish and durable Uuderwear and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods at the very lowest prices, go to J. W. Oartnauy's estab- 
lishment, No. 25 Kearny street. 



Take Haight street or McAllister street cable cars to Park and hear 
( ' onert aud take a stroll among the trees and flowers on Saturday after- 
noon. 



■ I *H ' l_| ■ ^^J of Every Description, 

— L- — i— I l i l IK— ? " For Decorations. 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 

311, 313, 315 and 317 Market street, San Francisco. 



T 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

he Company's Steamers will sail Tor llonghong;, Tia 

YOKOHAMA: 

CITY OF NSW YORK SEPTEMBER 2d, at 15 o'olook «. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at reduced rates. 
For New York, via Panama: 
COMMA AUGUST 1st, at 10 o'clock A. M., 

Taking freight and passengers to ACAPULCO, CHAMPERICO, SAN JOSE DE 
GAUTEMALA, ACA.IUTLA, LA UBEB.TAD and PUHTA ARENAS. 

For Honolulu, Auckland anil Sydney: 

CITY OF SYDNEY SATURDAY', AUGUST 2d, at 12 o'clock M., 

Or Immediately on arrival of the English mails. 
Ten Dollars additional is charged for Upper Cahin passage. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan streets. 
[August 2,j WILLIAMS. DIMOND & CO., General Agents. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO. 

Ppor Japan anil China.— Leave Wharf Corner First and 
1 BRANNAN STREETS at 12 o'clock noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONG- 
KONG, connecting at Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai: 

OCEANIC CAl'T. METCALFE AUGUST 7tli 

ARABIC CAl'T. PEARNE U'Ol'ST Wttl 

SAX PABLO CAPT. REED.. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and Return at. Reduced Rates. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets on sale at C. P. R. R. Co.'s 
General Office, Room 71, cor. Fourth and Townseml sts. 
For Freight, apply to GEORGE H. RICE, Freight Agent, at the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company's Wharf, or at No. 202 Market street, Union Block. 

T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Aeent. 
LELAND STANFORD. President. July 26. 



FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

The Oregon Railway and Navigation Company aud Pacilic- 
Coa*.t Steamship Company will dispatch from Spear-street Wharf, for the 
above ports, one of their new Al Iron Steamships, viz.: COLUMBIA, STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA and OREGON. 

Sailing- J>aj s; 

AUGUST 2-7-12-17-22-37, and Sept 1, and every following 

Five Days, at 10 o'clock a. m-. 
Connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads and their connecting 
Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho Territories, BritiBh 
Columbia and Alaska. 

Ticket Office 214 Montgomery Street 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
[August 2. J No. 10 Market street, San Franoifico. 



S 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

t earners of this Company will sail from Broadway Wliarl 

as follows : 

For Victoria, B. C.aml Puget Sound Ports: 10 a. m.. AUGUST 3d, 11th, 19th, 27th 
ami SEPTEMBER 4th, and every eighth day thereafter. The fiist steamer of the 
month connects at Port Townsend with steamer '* Idaho " for Alastta. 
For Portland, Oregon, in connection with the O. R. and N. Co.: Every five days. 
For Santa Cruz, Monterey. San Simeon, Cayucoa, Pott Harford, San Luis Obispo, 
Gaviota, Sauta Barbara, Ventura, Huencme, San Pedro, Los Angeles- aud San Diego: 
About every second day, excepting San Diego, every fifth day a. m. 
For Eureka, Areata, and hlookton, Humboldt Bay: Every Wednesday, at 9 o'clock. 
For Point Arena, Mendocino, etc.: Every Monday, at 3 P. M. 
Ticket Office, No. 214 Montgomery Street, near Fine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., General Agents, 
[August 2.] No. 10 MarkeL street. 

CALIFORNIA AND MEXICAN S. S. LINE 

For Eiiseiuifla, Mii^ditlena Bay, Cape St. Lucas, Maxnllan, 
LA PAZ mid GUAYMAS.— The Steamship NEWBERN, E. T. ROGERS, Mas- 
ter, will leave for the above ports on 

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6th, 1884, at 10 o'clock 4. M., 

FROM WASHINGTON-STREET WHARF. 
Through Bills of Lading will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will 
be received on FKIDAY, August 1st. No freight received after TUESDAY, Au- 
gust 5th, at 12 o'clock M., aud B'lts of Coding must be accompanied by Cuatom- 
UOUse and Consular clearances. For Freight or Passage applv to 

J. BERMINGHAM, Agent. 
lAu gnst 3,] N o. 10 Market street. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

FOB HCIXIILl [,l . rin'»|i!cinliil new 3000-tOM SteauMbins 
will leave the Company's wharf, corner of Stcuart and Harrison streets: 

ALAMEDA FRIDAY', AUGUST Lull 

MARIPOSA SATURDAY, AUGUST 30th 

AT 3 P. M. 
The MARIPOSA is now receiving freight. EXCURSION TICKETS at Reduced 
Rates. For further particulars apply to 

J. D, SPRECKELS & EROS., Agents, 
[August 2.] 327 .Market street. 



J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 n tui 61 Minna street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco One Block from Palace Hotel. 

Also Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also Northeast Corner 
Meiilgomery and Bush streets. Veliieles of Everv Description at Reduced Rates. 
TELEPHONE No. 153. July 26. 



Aug S 



CALIFORNIA ADVKRTISER. 



IS 



SUNBEAMS. 



Foto of tho Plagues. Oam apon a tint there wu r grand foteof the 
Plague*. All the Bpldusin w.-rr thcrr, and in addition invitations had 

bato hratd lo many otba Artiolaa. Tb« Ohdbn, having bMO kbrawl, 

wu given a warm welcome and taken around anions the other guettta to 
be congratulated. He greeted Yellow Jack and Mr. i 'o(Hn a* old Maud*, 
but suddenly a topped in amazement before a stranger he had never before 
seen. " Have yon traveled much!" he asked of the stranger. " i have," 
was the modest reply. " Vet yon never met me, did you?" inquired the 
Cholera. " Never. 'V«wr, verv queer," mused the Cholera, - " I thought 
I knew everybody. And priy," ha added, "what is your name?*' " My 
name," answered the stranger, " is Soap." — Pkd. Call. 

" My dear," said a young wife to her husband, who had already fallen 
into |hi hftMl of going to the lodge in the evening, and wbo wa« just pTB» 
paring t" go out, ** I am going up street to interview the superintendent 
of the po*t -office this evening." "Ah, indeed ! On what business, pray ? " 
" I want to see if he can give me any advice in regard to getting a habit- 
ually late male in on time." The husband blushed, pretended he was 
toonng for ■ Mwsnnpar instead of bis hat, and there was a member ab- 
lent from the. lodge that night. — Ex. 

Disgusting Vulgarity.— Miss Eulalia — '* I don't see what the men can 
find to admire in that Miss Hansom to call her the belle of the springs. 
I think she's just horrid." Miss Eudora — So do I. She is so disgrace- 
fully vulgar.' Miss Eulalia—" I had not noticed that." Miss Eudora — 
"(i, her vulgarity is simply unendurable. What do you think? The 
other afternoon when we were playing lawn tennis she actually got in a 
perspirati"ii." — Phil. Call. 

A Cooling Hint.— Mr. Spriggs — "Very warm this evening." The 
Misses Biggs (six of them) — Yes ; very warm." Mr. Spriggs — '* I sin- 
cerely hope there will be another cool wave soon. In fact I have no- 
— ■ The Misses Biggs—" We have not-iced either."— Phila. Call. 
A now song is called : " Wilt thou, Wilt thou ? " It is supposed to 
be dedicated to a collar and pair of cuffs. — Boston Post. 

Can't Stand the R — New York Independent: " I might enduah 
Blaine, but I cawn't go Logan." New York Republican — " Why not?" 
" He is so illiterate.'' "O, that's all a hoax gotten up by Western humor- 
ists." " But it is true, for I heard him speak, And his pronunciation is 
simply atrocious." " In what way ? " " He said ' horse ' for ' boss.' " 

—Phil. CaU. 
Monday Morning. 
A line of clothes hung up to dry, 

Fann'd by the breezes from the south ; 
A pair of freckled arms upraised, 
A dozen clothespins in her mouth. 
A little three-year-old, who had just heard the nurse tell his father 
that the newly-arrived baby was his very image, crept to his mother's 
side and whispered: "Who brought baby, mamma?" "The angels, 
dear." "And did the wicked angels rub bis hair all off to make him look 
like papa? " 

" Begorra, I've always been a Dimmycrat, but Til vote for Logan this 
toime," exclaimed an enthusiastic Irishman on the glorious Fourth. 
When asked his reason, he replied: " Shure an' the papers sez he mur- 
ders the English, and be the powers Oim down on the English." 

— Norriatown Herald. 
"You look as if you had been kissed by a breeze from Northland," 
said a poetic young lady to a pretty friend, whose cheeks were glowing 
with color. "O, no," was the laughing reply, "it was only a soft heir 
from Baltimore." 

Said the dentist, " No doubt 
Without pain 'twill come out." 
Said the man with a grin, 
" That remark is tootb in." — Boston Star. 

A young gentleman who was trying to play a waltz on the piano got 
confused and made a mistake. While he was groping for the right chord 
a little girl in the room exclaimed: " Mamma, isn't he just like papa? 
He's lost his latch-key ? " — Bur. Free Press. 

" A lady at Newbury, S. C, the ether day, found a gold ring in a po- 
tato which she cut in two for dinner." And yet most ladies lose every 
chance of finding gold rings by hiring servants to peel the potatoes. 

—Philadelphia Call. 
"A Pennsylvania man avers that he saw a snake playing " Sweet Vio- 
lets " on the piano, striking the keys with his tail. This brings Pennsyl- 
vania whisky well up on the list. — Boston Post. 

A little Albany girl, spending the summer in the country, wrote to 
her father: " Please bring me a new toothbrush ; mine is moulting." 

— Harper's Bazar Accident. 
The clothes and hat of a missing man were recently found on the 
bank of a Florida stream. The alligator probably had no use for them. 

— Drake's Traveler's Magazine. 
" Toodles, did you ever see my pen point ? " " No, but I've seen your 
ink stand." " How can that be when they are both stationery? " 

Toodles says that all dogs are of French extraction. They are bo fond 
of the bony parts, you know. 
A misplaced switch— The teacher thrashing the wrong girl. 

— N. Y. Morning Journal. 
Motto for mud-slinging office-seekers — To the fixtures belongs the soil. 

— N. ¥. Morning Journal. 
People who are not suited with hard coal can easily be sooted with 
soft. — Phil. Call. 

Talk about babies ; but then, we never indulge in small talk. 

See advertisement on cover to know where to get the genuine K>ug 
Champagne from Reims, France. Beware of California and other coun- 
terfeits. 

A magnificent assortment of Japanese curiosities and works of art 
is to be seen at G. X. Marsh & Co's., No. 625 Market street. 



150 150 150 

THE STANDARD SHIRT, 

MM 
I 



SI I Ml- 1 I) 




N.B. 
150 

PINE LINEN: 

Is the VERY BEST Quality "WHITE SHIRT for 

Sl-50. 

Give this Shirt a trial, recommend it to your friends, and promoto Home Manu- 
facture by asking for 




150 



150 



150 



MOUNT VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

The undersigned, having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 
for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have now in store: 

Sail Duck, all Numbers ; 
Hydraulic, all Numbers ; 
Draper and Wagon Duck. 
From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a complete assortment of All Qualitie, 
2SJ-Inch DUCK, from 7 ozs. to 16 ozs. inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

THE /ETNA SPRINGS ARE NOW OPEN. 

To the highly curative properties of these waters and the charms of the place is 
added an Elegit and Capacious SWIMMING-BATH- These waters Purify the 
Blood, Refresh, Henew and Restore the Whole System. They Cure Rheumatism, 
Sciatica, Dyspepsia, Erysipelas, Kidney and Liver Diseases, Chronic Diarrhoea, Par- 
alysis and Pulmonary Complaints, in the early stages. They afford magical relief in 
cases of Nervousness, Sleeplessness and General Debility. 

For Pamphlet, containing- Analysis and Cures, address, 

Witt. BTJRNEIX. Superintendent, 
Or WE H. LIDELL, Proprietor, 
Udell Postoilice, Napa County, Cal. 

A CARD. 

To Merchants, Storekeepers, Captains, etc. 

ISIDOR BRAUN, 

Broker in Pearls and Precious Stones, 

44 BATTON GARDEN, LONDON, 

ENGLAND. 

^g- Consignments of PEARLS and PRECIOUS 

STONES will receive my BEST ATTENTION, and 

ACCOUNT SALES, with PROCEEDS, promptly 

remitted. May 3. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL, 

SANSOME STKEET, COB- HALLECK, SAN FBANCISCO. 

This hotel is in the very center of the bu^inees portion of the city, and has been 
renovated and newly furnished throughout. The traveling public will find this to 
be the most convenient, as well as the most comfortable and respectable hotel, in the 
city. TABLE FIRST CLASS. Boardand Room, SI, 81 25 and SI 50 per day. Nice 
Single Rooms, per night, 50 cents. Breakfasts or Dinners, 50 cents. Lunch, 26 
Cents. Eighteen Tickets, food for any mealB, $5. Hot and Cold Baths, free. Free 
Coach to and from the hotel. April 12. 

ART CLASS WORKS, 

No». 1211, 1213 and 1215 Howard St., bet. Eighth and Ninth. 



JOHN MALLON. 



May 3. 



6^" Purchasers can secure some BARGAINS IN IMPROVED 
and UNIMPROVED PROPERTY, by applying to 

t. M. BETNOLD8, Real Estate Agent, 

[April 5.] Park at. , near N. G. B. K , Alameda, Cal. 

AID TD T 7 Th* Send Bix cents for postage, and receive free, a costly boi 
± XY-LZ^ J_^. of goods which will help all, of either sex, to more money 
right away than anything else in this world. Fortunes await the workers absolute 1 ? 
sure. At once address Tkue & 0o„ Augusta, MaiDe. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 2, 1884 



COMMENTS ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. 

The cholera in France gives decided evidence of an abatement in its 
virulence, but at the same time there is an apparent tendency on its part 
to increase the area of its operations. The next two weeks will probably 
enable the experts to form an opinion as to whether it has exhausted itself 
or has still sufficient vitality to menace the health of the world. 

The scandal in connection with Cornwall, the ex-Secretary of the Irish 
Postoffice Department, is one of the dirtiest, filthiest tales which have 
ever disgraced any community. Associated with Cornwall in his atrocious 
crimes are Col. French, the Chief of the Irish Detective Force, Dr. 
Fernandez, a surgeon attached to the Cold Stream Guards, and other per- 
sons whose names have not yet been divulged. These names, it will be ob- 
served, all belong to the higher social levels, and yet the unspeakable crimes 
of which they are accused are of such a disgusting nature that brutal 
savages would blush to be accused of them. How such a condition of 
affairs was permitted to exist for years, right in the Lord-Lieutenant's 
official household, passes comprehension. However, now that they have 
been discovered and exposed, it is to be hoped that the guilty persons will 
be punished with all the rigor of the law. No punishment is too great for 
these brutes. They Bhould be hung, drawn and quartered, and their 
mutilated remains buried in a manure pile. 

The Irish National League, which is the new name for the Land 
League, does not Beem to be in a flourishing condition. In fact it gives 
indications of being in about as bad a condition as the best friend of law, 
order and good government could wish. Money from the American Pats 
and Biddies is not coming in with that freedom which it used to, and 
we all know that money makes combinations of rogues and fools "go" 
as well as mares. Then there is dissentions and divisions of council 
among the estimable patriots who lead this organization, and altogether 
it looks as though its power for evil was about over. With this fool- 
ish, mendacious and trucculent organization out of the way, there would 
be a chance to swing a large part of the Irish Parliamentary representa- 
tion into line with liberal sentiment in England and Scotland, and the re- 
sult would be the continued reformation of the social and legal angulari- 
ties which are to be found in all old countries and which are the heritage 
of ages whose habits of thought were not in sympathy with ours. 

In addition to the great demonstration at Hyde Park, London, in 
favor of the Franchise Bill, there have also been a great number of de- 
monstrations throughout the country districts of England. That which 
took place at Manchester was an unusually pronounced success, both in 
point of numbers and enthusiasm. There is no doubt that the feeling of 
the country is aroused over this Bill to an extent which was scarcely 
equaled in 1866, when Disraeli ousted the Russell Government, and, as 
the head of a Conservative Ministry, placated public sentiment by pass- 
ing an infinitely more Radical Reform Bill than that which his Liberal 
opponents had proposed, and which he had defeated. Unless the present 
House of Lords is a more stupidly stubborn body than it is generally sup- 
posed to be, it will pass the Franchise Bill at the Autumn session. The 
signs of the times are plain, and he who runs may read them. 

A Tory demonstration, designed to counteract the effect of the great 
Liberal gathering, was held last week in Hyde Park, London. A gener- 
ous estimate places the number of attendants at one thousand. This 
number will, probably, be found to be a pretty accurate indication of 
popular opinion. The meeting was clearly a demonstration — of weakness. 

The proBpect of a speedy settlement of the Franco-Chinese trouble is 
more than good. In fact it is already telegraphed that the Chinese Gov- 
ernment has agreed to pay S7,280,000 in the way of indemnity for the 
outrage committed at Langson, and the statement has an air of truth 
about it. There never was any doubt but that China would back down, 
rather than fight, unless she was assured of outside assistance. It is 
quite evident now that she had no promise of such assistance, and the de- 
gree of human stupidity which caused her rulers to permit the gross, 
yet organized, outrage, for which she has now to pay, to be perpetrated, is 
difficult to conceive of. 

In connection with this reported settlement of the Franco- Chinese dif- 
ficulty, it is also rumored that France has offered to forego the money in- 
demnity if she is granted certain exclusive trading privileges in certain 
provinces. It is interesting to note whether Chinese cupidity will jump 
at this chance to be thrifty, because, if it does, it will burn its fingerB. 
The other great commercial powers will, as certain as the sun rises, want 
similar privileges. 

There is a hitch in the Egyptian Conference. The French Shylbcks 
want the pound of flesh which is stipulated in the bond, and are indifferent 
as to whether, in cutting it out, a few thousand gallons of blood are spilled 
or not. Considering the manly way in which the French fleet steamed 
away from Alexandria when Arabi Pasha wa3 threatening to lay both 
principal and interest of the debt in shot and shell, the present attitude of 
the French Government is rather cheeky. 

Reports from the Soudan are encouraging, but they are no more reliable 
than usual. General Gordon is stated to be not only personally safe and 
able to hold his own, but to assume the aggressive. 

Grand Concert by the Second Regiment Band, in Golden Gate Park, 
Saturday, August 2d, from 1 to five p. ar. Programme can be had at Jos. 
Figel's, 211 Montgomery street. 



Take a run down to Santa Cruz or Monterey to-morrow. Return 
tickets by the excursion train over the S. P. R. R., which leaves Fourth 
and Townsend streets at 7:50, only cost S3. 



The Dial i3 the name of a New York paper. It ought to form a part- 
nership with the Sun, 

A proper asylum for perjurers— The lying-in hospital. 



ECLECTIC SCIENCE. 
A paper on the Polypi of the Sierras was read before the Cali- 
fornia Academy of Sciences, on Thursday of this week, by Prof. John 
Henry Richards, who presented the Academy with a representative col- 
lection of these interesting orchids. When Prof. Richards, who enjoys an 
European reputation, stated that the Polyps of California were the finest 
he had ever eaten, an involuntary round of applause burst from his audi- 
ence. In the opinion of the Professor our species are allied rather to the 
echinoderms of the Wealdonsaud than to the pachyderms of the Dravidian. 
They are fattest in the month of August, when great numbers may be 
taken by means of ordinary gill-nets set in trenches dug for the purpose. 
Prof. Richards entirely rejects the germ theory as applied to these beings, 
which he believes to be endemic in their mode of occurrence and probably 
meteoric in origin. On motion of Dr. Henry Richard Johns, a vote of 
thanks to Prof. Richards was adopted by the Aeb ciation, and the polyps 
spread on the minutes. — From the Alta's report. 

After the reading of Prof. Richards' paper on the Polycarps (not the 
"Polyps," as ignorantly reported by a contemporary), Prof. Davidson 
gave a succinct and lucid account of recent astronomical work. The par- 
allax (he said) of the double star, 24 Bobtis, has at last been analyzed 
spectrally, and found to consist of the vapor of meat. The nebula in 
Andromache shows distinct traces of coagulation, attributed by Prof. 
Newcomb to cyclonic, and by Prof. Thompson to vortical retardation of 
its perihelia. Prof. Huggins, however, adheres to his theory that the 
appearance is due to the presence of rennet in the penumbra. The ex- 
istence of a new satellite between the nodes of Aldebaran had been calcu- 
lated by himself {the speaker), and several amateur astronomers were 
now looking for it with verniers of high power. In the domain of mole- 
cular dynamics no new dynamites had been discovered, but a number of 
astronomers were calculating the molecules heretofore observed, and he 
(the speaker) did not 'despair of their labors. In answer to a question by 
a member, the President stated that a number of mounted microbes had 
been added to the collection. The lights were then turned down and the 
image of a tine tooth-comb projected on the screen by means of a powerful 
solar instrument. Numbers of ocelli and other active specimens of 
bathybius were perceived, their outline somewhat blurred, owing to polar- 
ization of the beam. Vice-President Muggins promised at the next meet- 
ing to read a paper. On motion it was then resolved that the next meeting 
be omitted, and the Society adjourned till the meeting following. 

— From the Examiner's report. 

The daily press has, during the past week, been very much exercised 
over a choice morsel of sensational gossip in the shape of the sudden dis- 
appearance of a French gentleman named Count Bonnemains. The cold 
facts of this case, however, will not bear the sensational construction put 
upon them. The simple truth is that the Count found himself financially 
embarrassed, and left without settling a number of bills. He was formerly 
an aide-de-camp on the staff of Marshal McMahon and is well connected in 
his native land. Upon his arrival there he will promptly send remit- 
tances to liquidate his indebtedness. The most unpleasant feature in the 
matter lies in the fact that a Captain Weis, an ex-aide de-camp,on the staff 
of President Grevy, has been a very active agent in harrassing and an- 
noying Count Bonnemains during the time of his difficulties. The two 
gentlemen have been fast friends for a long time and came to this coast 
together. Count Bonnemains was a little too liberal with his money, and 
when be had exhausted his resources his friend, in the language of the 
street, "went back on him." Such actions toward a countryman and 
brother officer do not tend to raise Captain Weis in the opinion of this 
community. He should ponder over the noblesse oblige. 



Dr. Koch attended the last meeting of the Sanitary Commission at 
Toulon, and stated that moisture was an essential condition for the trans- 
mission of the cholera germs. Every effort is therefore to be made to 
keep the town as dry as possible. He also said the disease is not conta- 
gious. The Marseilles correspondent of the Daily News states that he has 
been to Toulon and has seen Dr. Koch. He says: 

He has made, in conjunction with Dr. S trauss and Dr. Roux, a post- 
mortem examination of a cholera patient. He found in the intestines the 
Bame microbe he discovered in India and Egypt, which he declares to be 
the cause of the disease. Dr. Koch thinks that it is not inhaled, but 
swallowed in water, or with fruits or vegetables. It can be destroyed by 
heat — that is, by cooking food well and boiling drinking water. Dr. Koch 
says that people can be infected by soiled clothes. He thinks that the 
filthy condition of a city cannot create of itself the microbe, but that it 
aids the cholera by enfeebling its victims. The French savants will not 
express a decided opinion as to the microbe, but withhold their decision. 

For Sale or to Rent— A certain tract or parcel of unsurveyed public 
land, bounded on the north, south, east and west by undiscovered por- 
tions of oceans and continents. Said tract has for its center a stake called 
the North Pole, and whoever reaches it will make a stake for life — or, 
more probably, stake his life in the attempt. The property is open for 
occupation, and yet remains closed — owing to man's helplessness in the 
presence of that awful reality called the unknowable. 

A French meteorologist has, in the exposed court of his house, two 
bars of iron planted in the earth, to each of which is fixed a conductor of 
coated wire, terminated in a telephonic receiver. His practice is to con- 
sult the apparatus twice every day, and it never fails, through indications 
of earth-currents, to give notice of the approach of a storm twelve to fif- 
teen hours ahead. 

TAYLOR CHAIRS. 

What are Taylor Chairs ? Go and see them at the Warerooms of 
the California Furniture Company, Nos. 220 to 226 Bush street. 

The Sheltered Cove Baths, North Beach, are fitted up with every 
luxury and convenience. Everybody should go there and enjoy a plunge 
in the sea. 

Signs of Fowl Play— A scratched-up flower-bed. 




NBff s^|et t er 

<tf alif oxvMlKb bzxtx sex. 




Vol. 35. 



SAN FRAN0IS00. SATURDAY, AUG. 9. 1884. 



No. 5. 



MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE CO., FOR NAVIGATING THE AIR. (J 



H»-oKKh-K I 



UBOPLANB COMPANY lb» Kwtgrtluc Uu Air. «09 
i boon bom l i" 8 r. u. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



A Generous Railroad ,...801 

A Great Chance Ifl 

Annual Report of the Southern Pacific 

Railroad Company 1" 

Ant S. teiice ■* I 

A Tea Svmposium 11 

Imea f..r Indirtakcrs 1" 

" Bit" 10 1 

Britain for Blaine 20 

California Redwood Swindle 1 

OQIDDUnteOI] F.ircik'n Affairs 20 

Cradle, Altar and Tomb 18 

10 

KaJihimi'B VotM 2 

How Falae Hair U Obtained 5 

I. '!■ r fr. .ni London ft 

line 10 

I BJ 15l 

men, etc 8 

Mae's Letter 14 



Moral Readings 19 

NotmbiU* 1" 

Pairing Bantrkl IS 

SI nid 1i 

ill Generally and ttrroneouali 

Supposed lo he from the Bible 6 

Kcal Estate Itmnactloiu 17 

Scientific and ''semi B 

BoolHj 3 

Bporting 7 

Stocks 1 

Terrible Borne to a Menagerie 15 

The Lack of Harrying Men 2 

The Last Look (| toe try) 4 

The Theosoph teal Society of Paris 15 

The UncoOude 1!' 

Trite Savings of Noted Men 5 

Town Crier 11 

We Want to Begin 10 

Women — H&xlins. . 8 



STOCKS. 

The late break in tbe market was anticipated, to a certain extent, by 
dealers. Experience has taught them that to sustain high prices abun- 
dance of coin or an important ore development is required. Recognizing 
this fact they were enabled, during the past few weeks, to diagnose the 
future, and, consequently, those who did not core to realize the small 
profit of the present, were content to stow away their share*, with every 
confidence that when the small prospect shown up by a diamond drill — 
which was, of itself, sufficient to raise tbe market — is fully opened by the 
effective means of a cross-cut, prices will react in proportion. Some 
newspapers have been making a mountain out of a mole-hill. There was 
no reason for their unnecessary fuss over the " dreadful panic," as they 
were pleased to term it. The " poor, deluded creatures" were so few and 
far between, that the sympathetic wails of anguish from these public- 
spirited (?) sheets were wa3ted more or less on the " desert air." 

The stockholders in California are peculiarly unfortunate in the matter 
of assessments— one is little more than collected when another is levied. 
This is, however, only the natural result of more delinquent stock coming 
into the office than money. Each levy reduces the ranks of outside hold- 
ers and on them must fall the brunt of the expense roll. It takes coin to 
fiay miners and supply mining material. For this purpose stock is worth- 
ess. It has been rumored that consolidation and a reduction of shares 
will soon take place in California and Con. Virginia. This would be a 
move in the right direction. 

The winze on the 3,200-foot level of Mexican looks promising. The 
formation is of a description to warrant the hope that ore of good quality 
exists in the vicinity. This will be determined by the cross-cuts which 
will probably be started towards the end of this month. Higher prices 
for this stock may be expected in the near future. 

There is some good-looking quartz at the bottom of the drift on the 
3.100-foot level of Sierra Nevada. There is nothing whatever worthy of 
note in the condition of B. & B. and Gould & Curry. It is simply im- 
possible to comprehend what induces people to speculate in the former. 
It is to-day, and always has been, a worthless mine. It has never pro- 
duced a pound of metal, and the probabilities are great that it never 
will. Yet, in face of these well-known facts, it has always been the center 
of attraction. During dull times shares in this mine are always quoted 
at a higher figure than those adjoining, which have already produced their 
millions, with good expectations of tbe future. " WkaVs a doin' itV\ 

The crosscut on the 2,800-foot level of Hale & Norcross is being vigor- 
ously pushed ahead toward the point where the drill found the pay ore 
which caused the late rise in prices. The prospects are, as we said be- 
fore, more encouraging in this mine than they have been for many years. 

The east drift in Alta should reach the long-foretold ore body in a few 
days. If there is really any ore in the mine, it cannot be concealed much 
longer. The price of the stock itself will post the public. The west drift, 
which is also being pushed ahead, is passing through some promising 
ground. The annual election, which takes place on the 21sfc instant, will 
probably result in a change in the Board of Directors, which will benefit 
stockholders. The members of tbe present Board have not pulled to- 
gether, and some mistakes have been made which otherwise might have 
been avoided. 

Navajo is shipping bullion at the rate of $10,000 a week. It is not un- 
likely that dividends will Boon again be the order of the day, Grand 
Prize, one of the most infamous wildcats in the Tuscarora group, is quoted 
at 05 cents. We once more caution the public against touching these 
shares. They are being washed in order to dispose of the stocks hurled 
back at the company bv disgusted holders, who were frozen out some 
months ago by the assessment racket, after being trapped at high figures. 
This iB nothing more than the old game being worked over again. 



London, Auk;. 7— Consols, 101 7-16d. 



OU) BABS '.'I'" line par. -KKHMEt) Silver- 14315 P cent, din- 
count. Mexican Dollars, UfaJUU per cent. disc. 



'Exchange on New York, 20c; on London Banker-, 
Paris njrht, . r >ii"'" *' 10 francs per dollar. Telflgramsoo New fork, 



' Price of Money here, 7@10 per cent, per year— bank rate. In the 
open market, 1(31 i per month. Demand fair. On Bond Security, 
6 per cent, per year, on Call l>.uiarnl g I. 

• Latest price of Sterling in New York, 482.}@484£. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV. BONDS. 

s,tn F*ranMsco, Aug. 8, 1H84. 



Stocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Asked 


Stocks and Bonds. 
Tudson tfanufg Co. 


Bid 


Askrd 


BONDS. 






171 


26 


Cal. State Bonds, 6's,'57 — 


— 


— 


BASKS. 






S. F. City & Co. B'da, 6s,'68 


— 


— 


Bank of California (exdlv). 


155 


160 


S. F. City & Co. B'ds, 7s ... 


— 


— 


Pacific Bank (ex div) 


12. 


— 


Montg'y Av. Bonds 


— 


— 


First National (ex div) .... 


115 


liu 




— 


— 


UAILKOADS. 






Sacramento City Bonds 


— 


— 




40 


42 




— 


_ 




11U 


in 












70 


B2 




— 


— 




57) 


61 




— 


— 


N. B. and Mission R. R 


96V 


Loa Angeles County Bond*. 
Los Angeles City Bonds. . . . 




— 




96 
96 


99 




97 


Virg'a & Truck eo R. R. Bds. 


— 


— 


Central R. R. Co 


20 


— 


Nevada Co. N. G. R. R. Bds 


— 


— 


Market Street R. R 


Norn. 


Num. 




— 


-~ 


Clay Street Mill R. R 


N'.iin. 


Norn. 


Or.R.&N.Co.Bonds,6s(exe) 


106 


108 


S. F. Gaslight Co 


52 


62* 
29| 




100 


1001 




27 


U S. is (ex cou) 


LIU 


iu>i 


Sac'to Gaslight Co (ex div) , 


57 


69 


N.Pacifie R.R. Bonds 


1"1'. 


1 


Califora Powder Co 


— 


— 




- 


120 




50 

3'> 


(10 




Gold and Stock Teleg'h Co. 


45 




6* 




120 

85 


125 

92 


S.V.W.W.Co's Slock 

S.V.W.W.Co's Bonds 

Pacific Coast S. S. Co's Stock 


B71 

IIOJ 


«8 




1101 


MISCELLANKOrs. 




95 


115 




141 


150 




4Si 


50 




60 
50 


68 






02* 






35 


IN.SI'KANCK COMPANIES. 








10 
4 


Ui 




114 




Hawaiian Commercial Co.. 


Fireman's Fund (ex div) .. 


130 


California Iron and Steel Co. 





"1 


California (ex uiv) 


— 


114 



The inquiry alluded to in our last week's report ceased at the com- 
mencement of this week, and the transactions of record have merely es- 
tablished lower prices. Money is working easier, and some banks are free 
lenders on call, with Al collaterals, at 6 per cent, per annum. 

A. Baikd, No. 411 Montgomery street. 

CALIFORNIA REDWOOD SWINDLE. 

We are glad to see that The Financial News, oi London, has taken 
up this fraud in dead earnest. We note this fact with pleasure, realizing 
that this paper is a leading authority in London financial circles. Our 
efforts to save the British investor from an outrageous robbery have again 
been successful. The position of the conspirators here is unchanged. 
Should any new developments arise, we will, as usual, keep our readers 
posted. It seems unnecessary to again warn investors against buyiug 
this stock. 

Grain Charters. — It will be seen by what follows that two or more 
ships have been re-cbartered: British iron ship Tilkhurat, 1,527 tons, 
Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2 5s.. September loading ; a re-charter. British 
iron ship Phasis, 1.400 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., £2 5s. ; lay days to 
commence September 15th ; a recharter. Ship America, 1,052 tons, 
Wheat to Liverpool, Dublin or Antwerp, £1 18s. ; orders for one of the 
above ports, £2 Is. (3d. British iron ship Reliance, 2,000 tons, Wheat to 
Liverpool, Dublin, Havre or Antwerp, £2; orders for one of the above 
ports, £2 2s. Gd. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 8, 
1884.— U. S. Bonds— 3s, 100$; 4s, 119g; 44s, 1124. Sterling Exchange, 
483@485. Western Union, 633. Wool— Spring, fine, 15@24 ; Burry, 
10@14; Pulled, 2S@35 ; Fall Clips, 12@15 ; Burry, 10@14. London, 
Aug. 8.— Liverpool Wheat Market, 7s. Gd.@7s. 9d. Very heavy. 



Mr. Augustine Robinson, an advertising solicitor and a bilk of the 
first water, was arrested last Wednesday on a charge of embezzlement 
preferred by the publisher of the Pacific Life. Mr. Robinson's business 
methods have been found to be very unsatisfactory by all the publishers 
he has worked for. 

The Bank of British North America has removed to 312 Pine 
street, San Francisco, the new quarters having been specially arranged for 
them, with large steel vaults and other conveniences. 

Registered at the Postoffiee at San Francisco, California, as Second-Ciass Matter. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER »AND 



Aug. 9, 1884. 



FASHION'S VOICE. 



Have you ever prayed earnestly for any particular thing and never 
got it? I have. 

I have been praying for a new idea or a new garment to write about 
for the last seven days, and am as far off the mark as ever — and that puts 
me in mind of a story. I know you all like my little memories of by-gone 
days. 

When I was a girl I knew a doctor. He was a dreadful man — believed 
in nothing — laughed everything to scorn, and my ! how he did swear. 
Well, one day I questioned him thus : 

" Vou are skeptical on all subjects, and appear to me to believe in 
nothing. How is it?" 

" Well, I'll tell," he answered. " Once I was a real good boy, went to 
church and Sunday-school, and believed everything that was told me. I 
had heard a great deal about the answer to prayer. Now, I wanted a 
Billy goat, above all things. I was twelve years old, and I thought what 
fine fun I could have riding him. Father would not buy me one, so I 
prayed day and night, for six weeks, for that Billy goat, and at the end of 
that time was as far off getting him as ever. So I said : Hereafter I be- 
lieve in nothing. I'm a good boy, and deserve the goat, and, since my 
prayers are useless, I will never try again, and I never did." He was an 
awful man, you see, and this is a true story. 

There is nothing new, but the Fair will afford me a wide field. I shall 
go and sit there every night and take in the dresses, and shan't I have 
heaps of fun? You know, there is a perfect mania for dressing up at the 
Fair. It's as bad as the opera was with Patti. Every one wants to look 
tine. Every lady is on the mash; old men and maidens, young men and 
faded-out dames. It is all one, without respect of age or person. I hope 
to cull many anew idea from the mashers at the Fair, Saturday of course 
yielding plenty of scope. 

I understand they are going to have a bustle factory at the Fair, 
combined with a cheap bust department. It will be necessary to be 
measured on the spot, for which purpose a small room is fitted up in the 
rear of the stand. No doubt the proprietors will realize largely. 

On dit, that the bustle a la mode will be made to fit closely to the form 
of her who buys. At present the regulation bustle does not suit every- 
one. It wriggles about and conveys the notion that the wearer has stoleD 
a package of Boft goods and has tied it on her back to avoid discovery ; 
but the fan bustle has some sort of spring attached to it, or rather it is 
made on springs of such pliable and fairy dimensions, that the effect, com- 
bined with lightness, will make the most fastidious woman happy. Don't 
forget to find the bustle department. I think it will be somewhere near, 
or among, the machinery. By the way, I am delighted to perceive that 
linen cuffs and collars, perfectly plain, have found their way into use 
once more. That vile mode of having no relieving streak of white round 
the throat and wrists, is now perfectly obsolete, and the extremely short 
sleeves will, of course, drop out of fashion. 

It was positively agonizing to see women strip off their 24-button kids, 
leaving a brown stick, in lieu of a white arm. thrust through an elbow 
sleeve. Fancy a woman who has to wash up her own dishes and other- 
wise expose her arms to hot water, coal-dust and bad weather, wearing a 
sleeve six inches above her wrist, forgetting that it takes an excrutiat- 
ingly beautiful arm to bear such a display! But all this is at an end, and 
no more you need to sigh, ladies, because you feel it borne upon you 
to follow fashion in the matter of stripping your poor arms as though 
you were tucking up for a day's washing. 

Again there was the high, red fat arm, suggestive of highly-corned 
beef, with a full complement of saltpetre running through. I think this 
style is even worse than the brown-stick, but thank goodness! all this is 
repealed, and the modest white linen cuff peep3 out once more below the 
respectable sleeve, covering a multitude of defects. Then the lean throat 
no longer attracts attention by the lack of that pretty finish, a collar — 
not a frill, mind you, but a plain white linen colar, 15 cents apiece, or 
four for four bits. Who would be without at the price ? Seldom do we 
see a really pretty throat, never a beautiful one. How can it be expected, 
seeing that no padding can be here used? The appearance of a figure 
having a beautiful bust, wire or otherwise, from whence ascends a thin 
pillar passing for a throat, is too utterly too-too; and when these slender 
columns, void of roundness, or other grace, were boldly shown as a thing 
of beauty, with nary a bit of white, or any other finish, it was too in- 
tensely like a bad comedy to provoke anything but a sneer. To be " in 
the fashion " and make a guy of oneself at the same time, shows neither 
sense or good taste. I knew a lovely woman in the days when such a 
thing as wire busts were not known. She was woefully thin, but her face 
was like a poet's dream. Whenever she went out in ball attire — that is, 
decollete, which is de rigueur in Europe — she always wore some intangible 
web of white tulle fastened — heaven knows how, but it wound round her 
throat, bust and arms, and she looked like a goddess in clouds. The 
finesse of that woman's dressing was perfect. No one knew she was hid- 
ing her shapelessness, but rather thought this style peculiarly her own — 
was donned for the purpose of distinguishing herself by oddness. 

In like manner I once had a fearful boil on my chin. It was in Hono- 
lulu, and there was to be a ball given one tropical night. I was bound 
to go and see King Calico. So I put on a silver-grey silk dress, and tak- 
ing a few yards of illusion, I wrapped it round my head, burying my 
offending chin in the same. The tulle I fastened by sprays of the fade- 
less flowers of that clime, and so wonderful was the effect that I was the 
admired of all beholders, and the next ball every woman had tied up her 
head in a veil of tulle. Such is the force of novelty. I once saw a very 
handsome man, who was very tipsy, and his wife had hid his hat to keep 
him at home. Vainly he looked for it. At last, with a loud hiccup, he 

said : " D n the hat ; give me the boiler lid," and going to the kitchen 

he took that useful article from the cook, placed it square on his head and 
walked out. 

Ever after the boys of the village wore saucepan-lids on their heads, 
and reeled about whenever they felt funny. Such is the force of example. 
Apropos of Honolulu, to you who have not been there, let me tell you 
that there is a species of native flower which lasts for days. Tne ladies 
string these star-like blossoms together for bracelets round their arms, 
and necklaces worn with white dresses. Should the wearer be young and 
pretty, it is the very prettiest effect I ever saw. 



Well, my prayer is answered. Surely I have given you novelty to-day, 
and it all came to me just as I was in despair. Look out, now, for Fair 
costumes, and be careful what you wear, for I am bound to write you up, 
you know. Silveh Pen. 

THE LACK OF MARRYING MEN. 

A subject which is being a good deal discussed at present in our fash- 
ionable circles, is the scarcity of marrying men, and the general undesira- 
bility — so to speak — of the young men of the day as parties for the fair 
blossoms that are so patiently waiting to be called from the parterres of 
society. It is a subject worthy of reflection, and also one worthy of 
passing remark from us, who aim to be a mirror of the times. Let us 
then ask the question: Why doe3 this state of affairB exist? Several 
answers may be given to the query, chief among them the general laxity 
ot morals which obtain at the present day. Great wealth has enabled our 
rich men to give their sons Eastern and European collegiate education, 
which, instead of having the effect of producing higher culture 
of mind and manner, has in too many instances resulted 
in a contempt for anything like labor, an actual incompetency 
for daily bread winning, and habits formed of luxury and 
extravagance. It is possible that the prevailing epidemic at the East of 
Anglomania may have something to do with this, but in a country like 
ours, where labor is honorable, where a man is estimated (or should be) 
at his own intrinsic worth, and can make himself anything his ambition 
may lead him to, is it not pitiable to see a young man entering life blase, 
lazy, good for nothing ; his chief aim in life, apparently, to make the 
(( old man's " dollars dance to the tune of fast horses, fast women and fast 
living generally. What father or mother would wish to trust a tenderly- 
reared, delicately-bred daughter to the care of such a creature ? 

Leaving aside the gilded youth, take the young men of the day as they 
come. Bank clerks, clerks in insurance and mercantile houses — they are, 
chiefly — sprinkled here and there with delegates from the professions. 
Their visible means of support are salaries varying from S75 to 8250 a 
month. Were the young man prudent, economical and thrifty, he might 
with propriety ask a sensible, well-brought-up girl to share his lot, and, 
by combined efforts, the salary would amply suffice to make a happy 
home. But is it dune ? Where to-day is the young man of Society who 
will eschew his o,wn comfort to save for matrimony? On the contrary, if 
fiat state is at all regarded, it is in the light of an easy way of getting 
well fixed in life through wedding a wealthy wife. Even a glimpse of the 
ballroom or Lawn Tennis ground of the period will convince the onlooker 
of the character of the "serious intentions" indulged in by our young 
men as they fetch and carry, or dance attendance upon the rich girls, or 
those who have rich fathers. 

Time was when honor, rectitude, probity and stability were reckoned 
as a crown of glory to a man, and each son sought te emulate his father's 
reputation for it. Candor compels us to acknowledge that the fathers of 
to-day would prove no shining light to steer by and are as rapid in their 
pace through life as the younger generation pressing on their footsteps. 
So that, after all, the sons may offer in excuse the examples before their 
ages, of marital ties disregarded, neglected hearth-stones, reserved front 
seats for opera bouffe, and other etcetera of fashionable life. A good deal 
of the fault lies with the girls, too ; but of this we will treat in a sepa- 
rate article. 

Totbe Ladles. — Mrs. Lewis is now prepared to do the buying for per- 
sons in the interior, and any order received, either for Toilet, Millinery, 
Upholstery, Furniture, Jewelry, Ready-made Clothing, etc., will be 
promptly, correctly and conscientiously attended to. Strrngers in the 
city will find that by calling at Mrs. Lewis' rooms they will gain much 
valuable information. A commission of fifty cents will be charged for 
attending to small orders amounting to S10 or less, but on orders amount- 
ing to more than S10 no commission is charged. Address Mrs. E. G-. 
Lewis, Rooms 28 and 29, Thurlow Block, 126 Kearny street. San Francisco. 

BETHESDR 

COOLS THE BLOOD. 
Devoid of Strong Salts— Soft and Delicious. 

43- Persons who indulge in vinous and alcoholic stimulants will find it the 
MOST REFRESHING, ENLIVENING and INVIGORATING draught ever provided 
in the Laboratory of Nature. 

L. CAHEN & SON, 

418 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Miss Traver and Mrs. L. A. K. Clappe's 

SELECT SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN, 

AT HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON, WESTCHESTER COUNTY, N. Y. 



Number of pupils limited to fifteen. Send for Catalogue- 



May 3. 



ZEITSKA INSTITUTE, 

NO. 922 POST STREET. 

French, German aud English Day and Boarding-School for 
Y'oung Ladies and Children, with KINDERGARTEN. 
Term commenced July 17, 1SS4. Address MME. B. ZEITSKA, 
[July 19,] Principal. 

DANCING ACADEMY, 

1328 BUSH STREET. CORNER POLK, 

Prof. O. A. I,(i ii t respectfully announces that his new Acad- 
emy, 132S Bush street, is now open for Juvenile and Eveniug Classes. Office 
Hours, for Terms, etc., 10 A. M. to 12 H., aud 1 to 5 p. si. Feb. 9. 



It, 1SS4. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



8 



SOCIETY. 



AuRuit ?th. iss». Charming waathaf h rgntii tin* rub*, and I think 

Um probafaUttiaa ara that we ahall now have a continuance of it. Tlie 

far, hut been a oool one. Mid it i-» almost turn' that we felt a 

little <■( th« lu-at baatowad by th.' raya ol the ran, bat tin- mlafortana of 

it ll that when »■■• dO| ttlSN tl umiiIIv I Bttlfl too 100.00 "f the article. 

Saturday fortunately proved plaaaant) and fcba naoll wan a rary 

lar K '<* attendant* at the first ol the aftafllOOn Park concerts. Many ol 

onr faabJ inablea appaarad among the proawnadara, thooRO the majority 
of them were either in oarrtajTM or on horseback. Kiue weather oontlna* 
i r ■ _r in. I ■ephyre deareaaing, they will, without doubt, become very popu- 
lar and wall attended. 

The UeohanioB 1 Pair i* alao open, and so fir the attendance has been 
ratifying that in the evenings baton already far above the average 
of first nightl in other years. It will be a pleasant lounge of the evening 
to alternate with the opera, provided the individual who manipulates the 
organ can be induced to forego his practicing in public. Alternating with 
the band, which is an excellent one, he no doubt aims at showing the 0OH- 
tract between .secular and religious music, and the result is the moat de- 
pressing imitation ol the latter that it has ever been my ill-fortune to 
listen to, and is little more than a series of discordant groans drawn from 
* moat unwilling instrument. It is a beautiful one when well played on; 
s.i phM>e, Mr. Organist, give us more harmonious sounds, or else let it 
■evenly alone, unless you wish to drive your audience from the building. 
'v in town still remains in a state of quietude ; but no doubt the 
dual entertainment of this afternoon and evening at the Bunkers will 
•ople up a bit, as it is the Brat one of any magnitude which has 
taken place for several months. It promises to be a very brilliant arfair, a 
lany of their friends returning from the country especially for the 
occasion. 

WedUJiaga an still to the fore, however, and that of Lieutenant Knapp 
and Hlaa Lilly Samson hut Thursday afternoon was cpuite an event in 
■octal and in naval circles, to which branch of the service the groom be- 
loDfta. Tlu' ( 'hurch of the Advent, where the ceremony was performed, 
was tastefully decorated wdth flowers and vines, and the bridal party 
made a very pretty appearance, from the abundance of gold lace dis- 
played. Though day weddiuys are seldom as brilliant as those which are 
oelebnted in the evening, they are rapidly coming more into fashion at 
the Kast, as they always have been in Europe, and have been quite nu- 
merous here of late. The church was crowded with friends of the con- 
banting parties, the Southern element of our Society largely predominat- 
ing, and after the Rev. Mr. Gilkios had said the magic words which made 
the twain one, a goodly portion of them proceeded to the Harrison resi- 
dence, on Leavenworth street, where congratulations were made and a 
lunch partaken of, after which the happy pair departed for that haven of 
newly-wedded bliss, Monterey. 

The other wedding of the week -that of Mr. Fred Sharon and Mrs. 
Breckenridge— took all their friends greatly by surprise, not at its solem- 
nization, which has been looked forward to for some time, but at the 
quiet and unosteutatious way in which it was done. It is seldom that the 
representatives of so much wealth are united without a corresponding 
display being made, and the extreme plainness of this wedding was the 
novelty attending it. The happy pair are domiciled at the Palace Hotel, 
but later in the year will visit the groom's sister, Lady Hesketh, in Eng- 
land, who, in all probability, will come back with them for a visit when 
they return. 

The next wedding will be that of Mr. Fred Wooster and Miss Annie 
Jackson, at the residence of the bride, about the middle of the month, 
and then will follow those of Miss Ver Mehr. the youngest child of the 
Rev. Dr. Ver Mehr, and Mr. Wm. Dodge, which will take place early 
next month ; and Miss Mary Mears with Lieutenant Gait is also named 
for early in September. The last engagement out seems to give satisfac- 
tion to every one, which is something so unusual it deserves to be noted. 

The principal event in Oakland, of late, was the juvenile party at Mrs. 
Keqna's, which was certainly the most brilliant entertainment for those 
of teuder years ever attempted in this State. In Alameda much interest 
is felt in the approaching charity ball, to be held at the Park Opera House 
on the evening of the 15th. Great preparations are being made by the 
ladies who have it in charge, and the result will be one of the most de- 
lightful and perfect affairs of the kind ever given in the sacred cause of 
charity. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Lunt gave a delightful Musicale at their elegant 
residence in Alameda on last Wednesday evening. Quite a large party 
of friends were present, and the entertainment was a pronounced success, 
both socially and artistically. Professor and Mrs. Heimburger and Miss 
Lindley presided at the piano, and Mrs. R. N. Van Brunt and Mrs. 
Richards gave a number of choice vocal selections. 

On Monday afternoon last, Mr. William D. Scurlock. the News Let- 
ters cashier and bookkeeper, was married to Miss Elizabeth K., daughter 
of Mr. Andrew Foreman. The ceremony, which was very quiet, was per- 
formed at the residence of the bride's parents by the Rev. Robert M'Kenzie. 
Only the relatives of the contracting partiesand a very few intimate friends 
were present. At the conclusion of the ceremony an elegant lunch was 
partaken of by the company, and then an impromptu dance consumed 
the time up to the departure of the happy couple for Santa Cruz, where 
they will spend the honeymoon. The house was artistically decorated 
with flowers and evergreens, and presented a very attractive spectacle. 
The young people were the recipients of many elegant and useful tokens 
of friendship. Mr. Scurlock and his young bride start off on the journey 
through life with the sincere good wishes of a large array of earnest friends. 

The departures from town have been quite numerous of late, but are 
principally those who are finishing up their country visits for the season. 
Among them are : Mr. and Mrs. Mervyn Donahue, on a visit to the Von 
Schroders, at Santa Barbara ; Miss Sheda Torbet, to Santa Cruz ; Miss 
Wallace, to San Jose ; Mrs. Adam Grant, to the Geysers ; the Sander- 
sons, to the Floyds at Clear Lake. Miss Maggie Thornton has gone on a 
brief visit to Mrs. Selby, at Menlo Park, who has had her daughters, 
Mrs. Jackson Ralston and Mrs. Faxon Atherton, with her all Summer. 
Faxon Atherton is building a cottage near the maternal mansion on Cali- 
fornia street, and intends spending the Winter in town. Miss Lucille 
Thornton is slowly recovering from the effects of her late painful acci- 



dent. The MoAUIstan en at last tattlad for the Bummer M Mlromonte, 
their Rom Valley bom.-, Mr, nod Mrs. Wiee forming a part oJ tl 
t>mr,fj,. Th.' Sonmldelli will moo now be baali En town ■ cmlo, and will 
lw heartily welcome. Thi ben already. Mr* Aaha, who 

ha* been absent In Mew ¥orh for HvemJ weeks, is expected bank very 
aoon t when Mi** Lena, who hai been visiting her aunt then, will m 
ny her mother, Admiral and Mrs. Bcuofaldl m\ week 

from Pan l-'u.n. 

A Charity Party is announced to take place at th* Souse, 

Alameda, on the evening of August 15th, which) In addition to being In 
aid of ■ most worthy cause, promisee to bo a very mjcoeniftil sooisJ evenl 
in itself. Tin* beneficiary i> a poor widow won. an, who waa found help 
lastly sick and surrounded by several hungry young children, som< 

atfo. Her iinmt'diute needs were attended to, and tblfl entertainment has 
been designed in order to provide a fund for her future assistance. The 

case is one which appeals directly and forcibly to the best element of hu- 
man nature, and the result is that the Alameda and Oakland people are 
taking such an active interest in the affair that it promisee to, ;l* i- itatad 
above, not merely prove a great financial success, but also a pronounced 
social triumph. Kvery large-hearted man or woman should buy a ticket 
or two, and help the poor widow and the orphan children, besides enjoy- 
ing a good time. Recollect the words of the Hev. Dr. MoLeod, and 
" give your sold for silver, and your silver for brass, that you may help 
across the bar those who are struggling in the stormy sea of adversity be- 
yond." 

Pacific Congress Springs.—This delightful Summer resort has been 
thoroughly renovated throughout, and is now open to the public, The* a 
is uo more pleasant place to spend a few weeks than this, and Mr. \Y. 
H. Stedman does his utmost to make his guests comfortable and at home. 
There is excellent trout fishing to be had in the immediate vicinity, and 
pleasant picnic parties are constantly being gotten up. The water from 
the springs basso many healthful qualities, aud is so well known here, 
that comment from us is needless. Rooms can be secured by addressing 
W. H. Steadman, Saratoga, California. Stages connect at Los Gatofl 
with 8:30 A. m. and 2:30 p. m. trainB, S. P. C. It. R. Through fare, S2 SO. 



An Oregon editor predicts Cleveland's defeat because his name begins 
with a " C." He declares that no candidate whose name was initiated by 
this letter ever succeeded in reaching the White House, and cites as ex- 
amples Clay, Calhoun, Clinton, Cass, etc. We shall "C" next November 
whether this rule will apply to Cleveland or not. 



Art Notes.— We are pleased to see that another of those art-educators 
— the Art Stores — has been established at 11G Geary street by Mr. Rob- 
ert R. Hill, son of the well-known artist. A number of paintiugB are on 
exhibition, a small sketch of the Yosemite Valley being particularly at- 
tractive. 

E. Amsdcn, late of San Francisco, now of Yokohama, Japan, exports 
(skillfully packed) all classes of goods, from the rarest Curios and Works 
of Art to the more moderate grades, and invites correspondence. No. 18 
Yokohama, under Windsor Hotel. 










BLANKETS! 



We have opened a Special Department for the Sale of 

Blankets and Comfortables. 

We will show as large, if not a larger, Stock than 
can be Found in San Francisco. 



G"REAT I 2£I Xj 3 
Corner Kearnv and Commercial streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 9, 1884. 



THE LAST LOOK. 

Behold — not him we knew ! 
This was the prison which his soul looked through, 

Tender, and brave, and true. 

His voice no more is heard ; 
And his dead name — that dear familiar word — 

Lies on our lips unstirred. 

He spake with poet's tongue ; 
Living for him the minstrel's lyre was strung ; 

He shall not die unsung ! 

Grief tried his love, and pain ; 
And the long bondage of his martyr-chain 

Vexed his sweet soul — in vain ! 

It felt life's surges break. 
As, girt with stormy seas, his island lake, 

Smiling while tempests wake. 

How can we sorrow more? 
Grieve not for him whose heart had gone before 

To that untrodden shore ! 

Lo, through its leafy screen, 
A gleam of sunlight on a ring of green, 

Untrodden, half unseen ! 

Here let his body rest. 
Where the calm shadows that his bouI loved best 

May slide above his breast, 

Smooth his uncurtained bed ; 
And if some natural tears are softly shed, 

It is not for the dead. 

Fold the green turf aright 
For the long hours before the morning's light, 

And say the last Good Night ! 

And plant a clear white stone 
Close by those mounds which hold his loved, his own — 

Lonely, but not alone. 

Here let him sleeping lie, 
Till Heaven's bright watchers slumber in the sky, 

And Death himself shall die ! — Atlantic Monthly. 



ANT SCIENCE. 

Science does appear to Bhow that we human insects are, after all, only 
an inferior sort of ants. Any one fond of watching ant hills and the pro- 
ceedings of the inhabitants could put on record an observation or two that 
have not been made either by Sir John Lubbock or Mark Twain. The 
whole life of an ant is not only a human but an essentially American one. 
She is eternally at work amassing substance, which is devoured by the 
offspring. We never yet saw an ant that appeared to be amusing itself. 
But the parallel so far makes us to be only the peer of the ant ; here comes 
a naturalist, and shows how wretchedly inferior we actually are. The 
fact is, says he, that what we call the lower animals have special intelli- 
gence of their own as far transcending our intelligence as our peculiar in- 
telligence transcends theirs. We are as incapable of following the track 
of a friend by the smell of his footsteps as a dog is of writing a meta- 
physical treatise. They are probably acquainted with a whole world of 
physical facts, of which we are entirely ignorant. * * * The drums 
of insect ears, and the tubes connected with them, are so minute that 
their world of sounds probably begins where ours ceases. * * * The 
ant enjoys a whole world of exquisite music, of which we know nothing. 
* * * The insect probably lives with a sense of vision revealing to him more 
than our microscopes show to us, and-with his minute ear-bag seusifying un- 
dulations or tremors beyond the limits of those Bensible to us as sound, 
warmth and light. (After showing the function of antennae as noses, 
rendered excessively acute, our scientific friend proceeds): Such an exten- 
sion of such a sensory function is equivalent to living in another world, 
of which we have no knowledge and can form no detinite conception. We, 
by our senses of touch and vision, know the shape and colors of objects, 
and by our very rudimentary olfactory organs form crude ideas of their 
chemistry or composition, through the medium of their material emana- 
tions ; but the huge exaggeration of this power in the insect should sup- 
ply him with instinctive perceptive powers of chemical analysis, a direct 
acquaintance with the inner molecular constitution of matter far clearer 
and deeper than we are able to obtain by laboratory analysis. That will 
do. We set out to show that ants were a superior sort of fellow-creatures, 
and have shown it. They not only hear music inaudible to us. but the 
horrors of Baby Mine and Bach's fugues are alike inaudible to them. 
They smell the subtle emanations of a lump of sugar, but appear insen- 
sible to those of the Chinese dwelling, whieb^they freely invade. Finally, 
they know more chemistry than the professor of that science himself. 
With proper deference toward intelligences so superior, I wish to tran- 
scribe here, from a famous collection of fables, the very best thing ever 
written about ants, by a mere man: 

An ant, laden with a trrain of corn, which he had acquired with infinite 
toil, was breasting a current of his fellows, each of whom, as is their eti- 
quette, insisted upon stopping him, feeling him all over and shaking 
hands. It occurred to him that an excess of ceremony is an abuse of 
courtesy. So he laid down his burden, sat upon it, folded all his legs 
tight to his body, and smiled a smile of great grimness. " Hullo, what's 
the matter with you ?" exclaimed the first insect, whose overtures were 
declined. " Sick of the hollow conventionalities of a rotten civilization," 
was the rasping reply. "Relapsed into the honest simplicity of primi- 
tive observance. Go to grass ! " "Ah! then we must trouble you for that 
corn. In a condition of primitive simplicity there are no rights ot prop- 
erty, you know. These are hollow conventionalities!" A light dawned 
upon the intellect of that pismire. He shook the reefs out of bis legs; 
he scratched the reverse of his ear; he grappled that cereal and trotted 
away like a giant refreshed. It was observed that he submitted, with a 
wealth of patience, to manipulation by his friends and neighbors, and 
went some distance out of his way to shake hands with strangers on com- 
peting lines of traffic. 

It. Cutlar (Dentist), Room 104, Phelan's Building, third floor. 



Wicked Adulteration! 



Eleven per Cent of Tartrate of 
Lime Discovered in Price's 
Baking Powder. 



Analysis of Price's Baking Powder, of Chicago, shows : 

LIME 3.53 per ct. 

AMMONIA 1.05 per ct. 

Starch 10.00 per ct. 

Professor Habirshaw, of New York, found the following in Price's 
Powder : 

TARTRATE OF LIME 11.85 per ct. 

Aside from the inferiority of a powder containing a useless substance 
equaling about one-eighth of its entire weight (aud which is the cause 
of the great lack of strength of Price's Baking Powder, as shown 
by the tests of the Government Chemists), there is to be considered 
the serious consequences that may arise from taking this large amount 
of lime into the system. 

Lime cannot be decomposed by heat, and is not eliminated in mix- 
ing or baking, and therefore all of this enormous proportion, as found 
in Price's Baking Powder, remains in the bread, biscuit, or cake with 
which it is mixed, and is taken into the stomach. 

By the application of heat to lime carbonic acid gas is driven off, 
and there is left quick-lime, a caustic so powerful that it is used by 
tanners to eat the hair from hides of animals, and in dissecting rooms 
to quickly rot the flash from the bones of dead subjects. 

Lime mixed with starch (and both are found in Price's Powder) will 
produce a ferment. The process is not quick, and does not take place 
until the food in which the baking powder is used has been some time 
in the stomach. Indigestion, dyspepsia and more serious disorders 
result. 

The cause of this large amount of Lime in Price's Baking Powder 
is the use of cheap and impure materials. 

Prof. C. B. Gibson, Chemist of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Chicago, had in view these impure powders containing lime, like 
Price's, when, after having made an examination of many of them, 
he volunteered the following testimony that ROYAL BAKl'NG POW- 
DER is the Best and Purest in the Market. 

The Royal Absolutely Pure! 

"Royal Baking Powder Co.: I recently procured a sample of your 
(Royal) baking powder from the kitchen of a private family in this 
city, and subjected it to an examination. I found it so different from 
many of the baking powders advertised as 'strictly* and 'absolutely 
pure,' and so far superior that I thought you would be pleased to 
know it, and might find use for the certificate. 

"In view of the vast difference and stupendous frauds that are 
offered to the most 'gullible' people on the face of the earth, it 
pleases me occasionally to strike an 'honest article.' 

"Respectfully, C. B. Gibson." 



Kug. :>. 1884 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



QUOTATIONS GENERALLY AND ERRONEOUSLY SUPPOSED 
TO BE FROM THE BIBLE. 
"God tampan the wind {•■ ui. than lamb." 

Sterne * S* titiwrntaf Juiimrj/. 

'• daaalioaai k Mil i- Oodlim Tkt flTonm, 

"In Um ini'l-t "f lift Wl .1 mi (Math." 

/ II 

m.t arlna which the Lord bad oommaodad t.> Ik- raoaived." 

7Vi» ShqUmJi Catechism. 
"Not i.. m wta above whal in written.'* Sot in 8 

'" V- ir 'ii >lt lTMD6th ir.-u, -,. . 1> >t li .in D U)M of ■ tricii'l," 

riptunJ form in: "Iron -hariH-nrth. -■**! n until ftharpaueth the 

I -t fri.-iii|.' /'r.-c, .r.( vii, 17. 

"That hfl who rani may read rbat he may ruu that raadetfa." 

Bab. i., 2. 
"Om ii" Dan anything but l.iv«\" "Owe no man anything, but t< • 

bar." — Hum. sii, s. 

" 1'rotif t<» *in as the spark* th.it tly npwanl." "Bom to trouble an 
the ■parka," etc. Rom. p, 7. 

" Bulled to Heaven in point of privilege." - X>t in th< Bible, 



HOW FALSE HAIR IS OBTAINED. 

Tno halr-cuttcrs in Kum|.i> pny nut no minify for the hair. They 
advertitt thai on a certain daj they will be at a certain place, ami the 
women and Ktrii meet them, and are given in exchange for their hair jew- 
elry, handkerchiefs, etc. The whole bead of hair is not clipped. The 
woman wear white ca|w on the back of the head, auil enough hair is left 
to make a good showing so long as the cap is not removed. All colors of 
hair are in demand, hut Monde in the most CaahionablOi The cutters sell 
ftxporfing housas on the nther side, and the American dealer buys 
from these establishments. The Scandinavian countries supply a grout 
deal. The blonde hair comes from there. Germany furnishes it, too, 
but not so much aa Norway and Sweden, and Denmark. Those portions 
of Europe where the peasantry is poorest furnish the hulk of the hair. 
Bohemia and Hungary furnish a large amount. From Italy is obtained 
what i-t known as Italian hair. This is, of course, dark — mostly black. 
It is coarse and very brittle. It ut obtained, in the first place, by pickers, 
who uiitke it business of ^nint: around to ash-barrels and picking out the 
hair. The Italian hair alone makes the cheapest and coarsest wigs. An- 
other cheap kind is the Chinese hair. This is mixed a great deal with 
4 * human hair." Of course, the Chinese are human, but in the trade they 
distinguish between human and Chinese hair. The latter is coarse and 
very brittle. The most expensive hair is white, and it is difficult to get. 
White obtained by bleaching does not last well; it turns yellow. A head 
of n tural white hair, of good length, is a scarce article. 

TRITE SAYINGS OF NOTED MEN. 
" The more I see of men, the more I love dogs." —John Randolph. 
" The best of all ways to lengthen our days is to steal a few hours from 
the night. - Tom Moore. 

" I would rather be right than be President." — Henry Clan. 

" He who in another's quarrel doth interpose, doth often wipe a bloody 
nose." — Samuel Butler. 

" The rank is but the guinea's stamp— 

A man's the gou'd for a' that." — Robert Burns. 

"Save me from my friends, and I'll protect myself from my enemies." 

— John Randolph. 
" Life is a game we all have to play. The wise enjoy it, fools grow sick 
of it; losers, we find, have the stakes to pay; winners laugh, for that's 
the trick of it." — Joe Orimnldi. 

" The pleasure of loving is in loving." — Rochefoucauld. 

" Oh, they love least that let men know they love." —Shakespeare. 
" Of all the paths leading to woman's love, pity is the straightest." 

— Fletcher. 
" Love understands love; it needs lo talk." —Longfellow. 

" No cord or cable can draw so forcibly or biod so fast as love can do 
with only a single thread."' — Bacon. 

Mr. I, Henage Carter, a veteran theatrical manager, now living in 
Cleveland, was the cause of placing Clara Morris on the stage. It oc- 
curred as follows : In 18G2 he brought a troupe of young girls to Cleve- 
land and opened in what is now called " The Comique." He boarded 
with a Mrs. Miller, and in the same house were two young girls, about 15 
years old, and their respective mothers. The girls got acquainted with 
the "show folks," and ultimately wished to see them perform, but as no 
ladies went to see the troupe at that place perform, the two girls begged 
i larter to let them go behind the scenes to witness the performance. He 
complied with their request, and the two young misses became infatuated 
and wanted to " go on the stage." Euch asked their mother's consent. 
One mother said " no," and the other "yes." The girl whose mother 
said " yes " went on the stage, and is to day the noted Clara Morris. The 
other girl is the wife of a master blacksmith, the mother of a troop of 
children, and resides in this city of San Francisco. The real name of 
Clara is Morrison, not Morris. She gets $500 a night for her services 
when she appears on the stage. Such are the plain facts of the two girls. 



No photographer can make any pretense of keeping up with the de- 
velopment 1 1 his art, or producing pictures which will do him credit, who 
does not use the celebrated Taber Dry Plate. This great invention, ena- 
bles the operator to accomplish thr-.-e times as much work as he could with 
the wet plate, and to accomplish it in a much more satisfactory manner. 
It produces clear, rich negatives by the electric, or any other bright, arti- 
ficial light, and has completely done away with the necessity for sunlight. 
Its quickness makes it especially valuable in taking pictures of children, 
animals or nervous persons. Mr. Taber, of No. 8 Montgomery street, 
who is himself a distinguished photographer, is prepared to supply the 
trade at reasonable prices. 

The Flacque Pictures of the Elite Studio have such a poetical effect 
that they are most popular. 



8ANKS. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

in* ■.r|...r.ii. .1 by Koynl (tinrlcr. Cnpitnl pulil ii|», KI.T I >.- 
000, * itli pi ui 110,000,000 

■ I I i H Oflta 'ii-' 

BranchH Portland, Ontton: Vlcloi id 
roll Dull tranncts » General limikUit: Boilneas a 

out BpacUl Dep mntod Mvni1vl.li- In nil part* of 

■ 
Draws direct al inunuil rates upon Its B< id Offla tad Brancui ,■ ipon I 

>-. follow! ; 

i .iik <.f tfontrsal; UvorpooJ North ... 
Wwivn Bunk; Boothnd British Unon Oompanj . Inland Bank ■•( Inland . He* 

too and Bouto Unerloa L Ion Bans of stextoo snd Boutfa anwi i . I b 

Ohartsnd Bank "t India, aoatralls ud Oblns ; Australia uid No* 
-f austrabuia, I Oompanj <>f Bydnoy, ) i 

mi Australian < lb irtarod Bank. 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital *3.000,00O. 

WM. AI.VOBD I»r<-»l.l<nl. 

TIIOMAN BROWN, Cashier | B. MI'KKAV. Jr., Ass'l Cashier 

AOBNTB : 

New York, Agency <>f tin* flank of Calfornla ; Boston, Tromont National Bank, 

QblOagO. Union National Bunk ; St. Louis, Boatumn'H Saving Hank; N.'v. Zealand, 

the Bank of Row Zealand. Oorrcsp Isnl In i. Ion, Messrs. N. u. Rotl 

S"iin, Correspondents In India. Ohinai Jupuu and Auatmlia, - . 

The Hunk I nut Atfcncictt at Viririnia City, ami l'.irrLii|K union in in all the prinoJ 

pal Uining Districts and Interior Towns of thu 1'acifl c«mst. 

LotU-rs ui Crt'iii! insmil, availahlu In all |»rtB i>f the WOlid. Draw direct on New 

Vork, Boston, Chicago, St, Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Ball Lake, I ti. 

Port'and, <>., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hambmy, 
Fninkfurt-on-the-Maiti, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, 
Locarim, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hotiffkimg, Shanghai, Tokobama, Genoa, 
and ;iii citlea Eo Italy and Switserl ind, 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Pnlil np < lipiini ni.5oh.uou, GoI<l. Proaldeut, iimnci I'm. 
liui'im. Vice-President, tiBOKGE A. LOW; Cashier, E. 0. MORGAN; 
Assistant Cashier, GEO. W. KLINE. 

DiKKtToKs. — U. Callaffhan, C. G, Hcioker, Peter Donahuo, Isaac Wnnnsur, Jiiiiilh 
Phelan, James Hcffitt, N. Van Beiyen, James II. Jennings, George a. Low. 

CORKESPONDENTS.— Loudon : Bank of Montreal. No. » liiRhin Lane, Lom- 
bard street. Dublin; Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg: Hesse, Neuman 
& Co. PariB: Hottinguer & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Cold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or 00 special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Coniuicrcia 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. June 28, 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital. $2,100,000. 

Snu FraiiclNCO Office, 42-1 California Htreet; LoimIou Office, 
22 Old Broad street. Portland Branch, 48 First Street. 
Manager ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 

Assistant Manager, WILLIAM STEEL. London Bankers— Bank of England and 
London Joint Stock Bank; New York, Drexel, Morgan it Co.; Boston, Third Na- 
tional Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking 
and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities 
and all parts of the world. June!). 

THE CALIFORNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

N. W. Corner Eddy ami Powell street*, San Fraucisco. 

Loans made on city and country real estate at current rates. Term and ordinary 
deposits received. Dividends paid in January and July, 
Last dividend, paid in January, 4.60 per cent. 

DIRECTORS— David Farqubarson (President), Robert V. Bunker (Vice-President), 

John Bain (Treasurer), John Boston (Surveyor), J. F. Cowdery (Attorney), A. 0. 
Corbett, Edward Farrell, Joseph R. Wilcox, Thomas Downing, Obarles D, Farquhar- 
son, Chas. Lux. [July 12.J Vernon Campbell, Secretary. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

N.E. Cor. Sansome and Pine Streets, 

Loutfon Office, 3 Angel Court ; New York Agrentf*, J. W. Sel- 
ifjman & Co., 21 Broad street. Authorized Capital Stock, §0,000,000. Will re- 
ceive Deposits, open Accounts, make Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, 
loan Money, and issue Letters of Credit available throughout the world. 

P, N. Lilikntual, Cashier. Sept. 13. 



THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000. 

Asfni-j al New York, 62 Wall street. 

Agency at Virginia, Nev. 

Buys and sells Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers. Issues Commercial and Trav- 
elers' Credits. Nov. 8. 

Oharles Crocker, E. 0, Woolworth, Wm, H, Crocker. 

CROCKER, WOOLWORTH & CO., 

BANKERS 
322 PINE STREET .* SAN FRANCISCO. 

C lurry on a General Bauklng* BuHlneNS. Correspondents 
j in the principal cities of the Eastern States and in Europe. June lo. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, »SOO,000. 

Officers: Vice-President, Jerome Lincoln ; Secretary, W. 
S. Jones; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. LoatiBinadeon Real Estate and other 
Approved Securities. Office : No, 215 Sansome street, San Francisco. Oct. 14. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aus. 8, 1884. 



PLEASURE'S WAND. 

" We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

Marchettl ia a composer without genius or originality. In his Buy 
Bias there is little to engage serious attention. It is a weak and dull 
opera— intrinsically stupid— in an attempted grand style. Marchetti has 
striven to graft some of the modern ideas of opera on the old Italian 
school. The result is not a pleasing one. In vocal melody, his methods 
are strictly conventional, bis furms of expression are hackneyed, and his 
coloring dull and common-place. In his orchestral treatment, Marchetti 
has been playing with edged tools. He has attempted to produce certain 
effects, without the genius which alone can give birth to them. A know 
ledge of harmony, in all its ramifications, will enable any composer to 
evolve intricate combinations with the many instruments at his com- 
mand, but. without the Divine touch, such work will be flat and unsatis- 
factory, being mechanical. It will never touch the heart or excite the 
imagination, because neither heart nor imagination had any share in its 

manufacture. 

* * * * * 

The libretto of Buy Bias follows the plot of Victor Hugo's great 
story more closely than do most libretti adapted from plays. In the 
present case this is a fault. The intention was to compose a dramatic 
opera, and the introduction of the comedy scenes of the play destroy the 
unities of such a composition. The whole second act of the opera is 
opera- cjmique, pure and simple, both in music and action. A still greater 
fault of the libretto is that the development of the plot is not indicated 
by action, but by musical dialogue. This renders the story unintelligible 
to all but those who are familiar with Hugo's play. It can be well un 
derstood that, with such drawbacks as uninteresting music and unintelli- 
gible plot, Buy Bias can never be a popular opera. 

***** 

The male singers appearing in the cast of Buy Bias relieved by their 
most satisfactory work the tedium of the performance. Giannini pos 
Besses qualities entitling him to as high a rank as that— with an exception 
or two— of every one of his contemporaries. In the East it is now cus- 
tomary to gauge the capacity of tenon by one standard — Campanini; but, 
excellent artist as he is, his standing is based upon fashion more than any- 
thing else, and in Europe he is not held in such great consideration. Fan- 
celli, Gayarre and Masini are the esteemed ones. Giannini i3 a greater 
artist than Campanini. He is always the artist. He never resorts to 
illegitimate means to accomplish * fleets which, however popular with 
certain people, cannot but be considered as meretricious. In Giannini's 
voice, with its timbre of genuine freshness, there is truth and passion. It 
is a voice both sensuous and brilliant. The true musician reveals himself 
in the expression imparted to every phrase of the score. In technique 
Giannini leaves but little to be desired. At times he is too abrupt in his 
changes from chest to head tones, and the necessary smoothness is lack- 
ing, but this fault is merely intermittent. His pianissimo is as effective as 
his forte. His cantabile phrases are delicious in their sentiment and pa- 
thos. After singing fourteen times in three weeks, and principally in 
operas of the most fatiguing type, Giannini shows but few signs of fatigue. 
There is no elimination of the con amore in his singing, and there are no 
evidences of mental overwork, but the voice is slightly clouded at 6rst, 
and it is only after an hour or bo of work that its glorious freshness is 
regained. Giannini is too anxious to please. He should show his mag- 
nificent voice some consideration. Every desire for an encore should not 
be granted to an audience more enthusiastic than appreciative, more noisy 
than thinking. As " Buy Bias " Giannini evidenced a good deal of dra- 
matic instinct. The last scene was acted with great force. 

***** 

Vilmant failed to give to his singing, as Don Salluste, the proper ex- 
pression. He was an amiable young man and nota revengeful schemer. 
Serbolini, as Don Guritano, was full of life and activity. His pantomine 
was, to say the least, redundant. Maria Peri, as the Queen, corroborated, 
by ber singing, the opinion expressed of her last week. She is unfortu- 
nate in possessing a voice and method that do not agree. A dramatic 
singer by instinct, nature has given her a light voice. In light music her 
method is too heavy; for dramatic singing her voice lacks depth and 
breadth. The sweetness of her voice and its expressiveness pleases, but as 
she cannot musically do justice to the score, she does not satisfy. Of one 
fault she should, by all means, cure herself. She cannot resist the tempta- 
tion of singing to the audience. Annina Orlandi is a person pleasant to 
look upon. There is but little to be said of her as an artist. She is crude 
in the extreme. Her voice is not fully developed yet, and it already 
shows a loss of tone. Its quality is common-place. 

***** 

In Buy Bias the chorus was very weak and the orchestra very bad. 
The good opinion created by the splendid work of both chorus and orches- 
tra in Aida has been dispelled by subsequent performances. Signor 
' Logbeder should call more orchestral rehearsals and be stricter in bis dis- 
cipline. 

* * - * * 

The Norma performances, last week, gave Damerini opportunity to 
appear to advantage. She sang well and acted well, and re-affirmed the 
satisfactory impression produced by her Aida. Serbolini was a remarka- 
bly good Oroveso. Orlandi a mediocre Adalgisa. Giannini was, of course, 
a magnificent Pollione. If the good people of San Francisco miss hearing 
this singer now, they are missing the most satisfactory tenor who has 
ever sang here, and they will regret it when his name will have become a 

famous one. 

***** 

The coming week is the last of this troupe at the California. A season 
at the Grand Opera House, with several operatic novelties, is an assured 
fact. On Thursday La Traviata, with Giannini's younger brother as 
Alfredo, and on Friday Ernania, were sung. These performances occur 

too late in the week for cumment in this issue. 

* * * * * 

At the Grand Opera House The Black Crook was produced on Wednes- 
day night and drew an enormous audience. It showed the wonderful 
popularity of that well known spectacle. The expectation, based upon 
The DemTs Auction, was not so high as to lead to comparison with the 
remembered productions of past days, and I suppose that a packed house at 



12:15, with a cordial encore for the clever acrobats, and plenty of ap- 
plause for the Jalma march, argues complete satisfaction. The perform- 
ance was draggy ; but the ballets all took immensely, and there was a 
sustained interest th?t overlooked waits and misspoken speeches and the 
hitches of stage business. The two tumblers came out as niggers, follow- 
ing one of the first ballets, and did a tumbling act which was enthusi- 
astically received. The necessary cutting done, the whole thing brought 
down to 10:30 — which was no difficult thing to do — The Black Croofc fa 
going to make money at the Grand. 

***** 

Leon and Cushman's Company is in its second and last week. The 
next attraction will be Gale and Spader's Bohemians, in one of those non- 
descript entertainments that form such an important class of amusements 
on the American stage of to-day. 

Manager Hayman is East. He will try and engage Irving, Bernhardt 
and Lulu Hurst. I hope he will succeed as far as the first of these 
celebrites is concerned. I wish to have a chance to write about that ex- 
traordinary individual. The Baldwin has been closed during the week. 
It will be re-opened on August 18th, with Sims' and Pettit's melodrama 
In the Banks, played by a strong company. The Orpheus Company play 
in the interior for a week or so. The seceeders have returned East. Their 
manner of leaving the troupe was foolish ; their talk about the press still 
more so. Their efforts to amuse were praised as they deserved, but there 
was no gush, and that's probably what was wanted. 

***** 

The Standard is being extensively renovated in anticipation of its re- 
opening by Reed's Minstrels. Several boxes are to be built. I don't ex- 
actly see where they are going to put them, but a bit of architectural in- 
genuity will evidently have solved the problem. Reed's company will 
comprise some noted people in the burnt-cork profession, among them J. 

Carroll Johnson, who was a great favorite here a few years ago. 

***** 

At the Tivoli Suppe"s bright opera, Fatanitza, is produced in good 
style. The accession of Helene Dingeon to the company has greatly 
strengthened it. In artistic merit, her singing far surpasses that of any 
of her associates. Williams, a neat comedian, who was a member three 
years ago, has returned from the East and is in the present cast. 
* * * * * 

Hatton was one day dining at the Star and Garter, at Richmond, near 
an open window. Just as be was about to begin his last course a tramp 
thrust his hand in the window, seized the jam pie and made off with it. 
The composer, struck with the incident, at once dashed off " Good-bye, 
sweet tart, good-bye." Cowen once attended the races at Newcastle, 
England, and was immediately surrounded by gamblers and betting men, 
beseeching him to make wagers with them on the result. Instead of doing 
this he called for pen, ink and paper and composed the "Better Land." 
Rossini was once a guest of a Presbyterian divine in Edinburg, and was 
invited to come and hear him preach, a special pew being proffered for the 
use of the composer. His only reply was the aria, " Non piu Mesta." 
Sullivan once was in search of a habitation in London and called on a 
well-known real estate agent, who asked him, " What kind of chambers 
do you want, and at what price?" Sullivan immediately sang "Suite, 
and low." Bealiclerc. 

CHARITY PARTY! 

Park Opera House. Alameda. Friday Evening, August 15th 

MUSIC BY BAL'ENBERG'S BA\D. 



TICKETS, BO CENTS-To be had of the following 
COMMITTEE : 

MRS. KING, 

MRS. F. MARRIOTT, Jr., 

MRS. DR. REYNOLDS, 



MRS. A. M. HICKOX, 
MRS. E. A. SCOTT, 
MRS. R. CUTLAK, 
MRS. F. H. MCCORMICK 
MRS. H. MICHAELS, 
MRS. C. A. EDSON. 



MRS H. W. A. NAHL, 
MRS. O. A. LUNT, 
MRS. C. S. PECK, 



MRS. E. P. ROWE. 
MARCH AT 8:30 P. M. 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

.1 GLOXIOTTS TRIUMPH! 
Gallagher, Gilmore & Gardner's BLACK CROOK! 

EVERYBODY ENTHUSIASTIC ! 



Matinco Saturday. Prices, 20c, 25c , 35c, 50c and 75c. 



August ■: 



CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

CAMBIAGGIO, S1ENI & LAMPANI'S 
GRAND ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY! 

This (Saturday) Afternoon, August 9th, Only Matinee. 

TRAVIATA ! 

SIGNORA DAMERINI as Violetta 

Sunday Evening, August JOth— Grand Extra Opera Night, when (by universal re- 
quest) will be repeated, for the Last time, AIDA. 



RESERVED SEATS NOW ON SALE. 



August 9. 



BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

Lessee and Manager Mr. M. B. LEAVITT | Acting Manager Mr. JAY RIAL 

TO-NIGHT-SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT. 

CLARENCE WHISTLER and P O'HANLaN! 

Grand Exhibition "f Wrestling, Especially Arranged for the Ladies of Sao Francisco. 

LEON & CTJSHMAN'S MINSTREL COMEDY CO. 

SARA BARNUM'S DILEMMA! I ncluding in the Piece the Burlesque, Ib-FED-DORA! 

Foil of Gjnuine Fun. Matinee Saturday. 

Monday, August llth-THE BOHEMIANS, in FIZZ! BANG!! BOOM!! 1 The 

Latest Great New York Success. Augut 9. 



'.'. 188<. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISER 



SPORTING. 



Rowing. The race .ant Sunday betwc« n four iwurd cwwb of the Artel 
fend 8oath Knd dobs. Id ihelU, »•*■ Intarattlng. .'!.•■ orewi km wy 

•Tfenlj Bfetefafed. Al «'• iii-lii »t.. 1 last wrrk, the Ari-I DSSO won; but Lhfl 

nw wa* in>t nwrd oq| t<> the hni*h. The time Hm 1 for Ihfe it 

Al hoar the title wm favorable mid tin- wind light, 
with unoota wjit.r. Had the race come tiff u agreed upon, there woald 
have heen doiibtleas a close am! exciting match From the tint tn the lant 
stroke ; hut shameful management delayed the start until after Doon, 
lc was then running ebb, fend the itronsj mtarrj u '"d lOfeda tin- 
water lumpy. When a start ma made, the Sooth End craw vol hold ol 
the water tirst and for a few length* had a slight lead, but after rowing 
i a quarter of a mile the Ariel men settled down to their work, pullinej 
Forty stroke* t.< the minute, and *."'n led iheir opponent* by half a length. 
The South Bod crew steered a bud Qonree, keeping in the middle of the 
channel, where the water was roughest. In spite of thift difefed vaj 
they heM the Ariel men bravely to the turning itfeks. Had they croseed 
nvei to the north wall they would have made much faster time. The 
Ariel crew made a good turn, with a lead of nearly a clear length. The 
Smith End crew evidently took ;i lot of water feboard Si the turn, for -non 
after heading for home their bos* tilled with water and they were com- 
pelled to give up the race. The Ariel men rowed a quick stroke back to 
the winning line, completing the distance of 3 miles in 18 minutes. The 
oonrsa wu evidently short, For in snch weather it is hardly probable a 
crew cotlld row three miles in the reported time. The race decided the 
ownership of the Breeder and Spornnnans cup, now won twice by the 
Ariel crew, and also landed them $250 -the stakes of the present match. 
These orawa have rowed three races within two months and all have 
turned out unsatisfactory. Tne first and second end.ug in fouls, and the 
third ae reported. We have Frequently urged rowing men to have their 
races rowt'd at nine o'clock in the morning* When they adopt our sug- 
geatiOD the sport may be attended with some satisfaction to the competi- 
tors and pleasure for the spectators. Before ten o'clock our bay is nearly 
always smooth enough for rowing in light boats. After twelve o'clock 
the chances are all against finding smooth water. Another tiling con- 
nected with rowing must be named: The public should be treated with 
some show of respect. Races announced for ten o'clock should start be- 
fore rive minutes past noon. Again, when a gentleman is asked to act as 
referee, he should not have thrust upon hiin the manual labor of prepai- 
ing the course. Such was the case last Sunday. The race last Saturday 
at t ».ik Point, New York, between Teenier and Rosa, must have been a 
grand sight. The time made Bhowa that both men were in grand form. 
The finish of a four-mile race, with less than a length between the boats, 
indicates that there was no " soldiering," especially as the time— 26:20 — 
beats Hanlan's record for the same distance by 1 minute and 36 seconds— 
quite equal to 200 yards. 

Cricket.— Last Saturday there was a pleasant scratch match at the 
Oakland Grounds. Sides were chosen by the juniors Goewey and Kip. 
For the former team the ancient Waterman scored 18, in good, safe style. 
Jacobs put 15 together, Creighton 12, Wilkinson 10 not out, the innings 
closing for 85. Captain Kip made the top score and the only double 
figure for his side, 16, the innings closing for 49. Two important matches 

Stayed by the Australians have been reported since our last issue. On 
uly 12th they played a drawn game against England, at the old Tr&fford 
Ground, Manchester. The scores were : Australia, first innings, 182 ; 
England, 95 and 180 for nine wickets. On July 18th the Australians 
met a strong team from Middlesex, and defeated them in one innings ; 
Australia scoring 188, of which Murdoch made 64 not out. Middlesex 
made but 53 and 106. Of the 20 Middlesex wickets SpofWth secured 12 
and Palmer 7, both bowling through each innings. The Eaton and Har- 
row match was played at Lords on July 12, and ended in a draw. This 
is the third year in succession when an unsatisfactory " draw " has to be 
written opposite this most attractive match. On July 12 tb the Philadel- 
phia team distinguished themselves by heating the Gentlemen of Surrey, 
at the Oral. Philadelphia scored 151 and 229 for nine wickets. Of the 
229 McNutt made 75 not out and the winning hit of the match. The 
Gentlemen of Surrey scored 189 and 190. The Australian team will not 
be able to include the United States in their present tour. Our cricketers 
hoped to be able to visit Portland this month, and play a team of that 
city, and also an eleven from British Columbia who are expected in Port- 
land on the 15th inst. Our cricket readers will be sorry to learn that 
Captain Atchison, of H. B. M. ship Swiftsure, who played for his ship at 
Oakland last year, met with a dangerous accident while riding, recently, 
in British Columbia. To-day the Occident and Merion Clubs will play 
the fifth match of the series for the Harrison Trophy. We are informed 
that the Merion team will have several changes in its personnel. Should 
the Occidents win to-day they will become final holders of the Trophy, as 
they have proved victorious in three out of the four matches already 
played. The Occident team will include the following players : Water- 
man, Purdy, Carr, Clark, Cookson, J. Knox, A. Knox, Bristowe, Camp- 
bell, De Golia, Kip and Sanderson. Should they play up to their best 
form we think they will score another win for the veterans. 

Bay Fishing.— Sport around the Bay during the past week has been 
irregular. On Sunday one angler caught 83 lbs. rock cod off Lime Point. 
He was doubtless well satisfied. Around Angel Island the usual favora- 
ble points were almost barren of fish last Sunday, while off California 
City, on the same tides, the fishing was good. Near Kershaw's the 
catches of rock cod were good. For a fortnight past smelt have been 
abundant along the Marin shore. Good catches were made last Sunday 
by parties on the old hulks near Tiburou, many of the fish weighing 1 lb. 
each. Last Sunday anglers who make weekly visits to Tiburon were 
pleased to find the new steamer on the route, and that in the afternoon 
they were allowed to go aboard, instead of waiting in the sun until the 
San Rafael train arrived. 

Athletics.— The Merion Cricket Club have